Nature: Highly cited researcher banned from journal board for citation abuse

Nature: Highly cited researcher banned from journal board for citation abuse. “A US-based biophysicist who is one of the world’s most highly cited researchers has been removed from the editorial board of one journal and barred as a reviewer for another, after repeatedly manipulating the peer-review process to amass citations to his own work.”

ACS Axial: Congratulations to 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Winners Frances H. Arnold, George P. Smith, and Sir Gregory P. Winter

ACS Axial: Congratulations to 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Winners Frances H. Arnold, George P. Smith, and Sir Gregory P. Winter. “Professor Arnold is the Linus Pauling Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering, and Biochemistry at the California Institute of Technology. She is a 32-year member of the American Chemical Society and serves on the Editorial Advisory Board of ACS Central Science. In 2005, ACS honored her with the Francis P. Garvan-John M. Olin Medal, which recognizes distinguished service to chemistry by women chemists. She has published more than 40 articles and book chapters in ACS Publications, as well as on ChemRxiv. Please enjoy the following papers that relate to her prize-winning discoveries. The papers are free to read for 30 days in honor of her achievement.”

Open Science: Sharing Data Do Not Indicate Twitter Significantly Augments Article-Level Citation Impact of Recent Research Results

Open Science: Sharing Data Do Not Indicate Twitter Significantly Augments Article-Level Citation Impact of Recent Research Results. “Guest-authoring a post, published on June 12, 2018, for the Altmetric Blog, Stefanie Haustein, an information science scholar from the University of Ottawa and Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada, has drawn attention to the mixed findings on the connection between Twitter mentions and citation counts of recently published articles. While social media, such as Facebook, can be assumed to contribute to the visibility of scientific research results, the collection of essays on Internet-based indicators for the impact of science edited by Wolfgang Glänzel, Henk Moed, Ulrich Schmoch and Mike Thelwall, to be published later in 2018, incidentally opens the discussion on the degree to which altmetrics can be helpful for the assessment of article-level impact.”

LSE Impact Blog: Introducing the Free Journal Network – community-controlled open access publishing

LSE Impact Blog: Introducing the Free Journal Network – community-controlled open access publishing. “Discontent with the scholarly publishing industry continues to grow, as the prevailing subscription model appears increasingly unsustainable and open access big deals, one mooted alternative, unlikely to lead to optimal outcomes either. The Free Journal Network was established earlier this year in order to nurture and promote journals that are free to both authors and readers, and run according to the Fair Open Access Principles. Mark C. Wilson describes the progress the network has made so far, why community ownership is a crucial and underappreciated issue, and what research libraries can do to help.”

NPR: Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century

NPR: Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century. “The technology that drives science forward is forever accelerating, but the same can’t be said for science communication. The basic process still holds many vestiges from its early days — that is the 17th century. Some scientists are pressing to change that critical part of the scientific enterprise.”

Times Higher Education: Publisher drops plan to charge extra for old papers after outcry

Times Higher Education: Publisher drops plan to charge extra for old papers after outcry. “Publisher Taylor & Francis has dropped plans to charge extra for access to older research papers online, after more than 110 universities signed a letter of protest. The latest renewal of UK universities’ deal with Taylor & Francis, which was agreed in principle at the end of January but is yet to be signed, for the first time covered papers published only in the past 20 years.” It gets worse. Read the whole article.

The “phantom reference:” How a made-up article got almost 400 citations (Retraction Watch)

Retraction Watch: The “phantom reference:” How a made-up article got almost 400 citations. “Pieter Kroonenberg, an emeritus professor of statistics at Leiden University in The Netherlands, was puzzled when he tried to locate a paper about academic writing and discovered the article didn’t exist. In fact, the journal—Journal of Science Communications—also didn’t exist. Perhaps Kroonenberg’s most bizarre discovery was that this made-up paper, ‘The art of writing a scientific article,’ had somehow been cited almost 400 times, according to Clarivate Analytics’ Web of Science.”

New York Times: Many Academics Are Eager to Publish in Worthless Journals

New York Times: Many Academics Are Eager to Publish in Worthless Journals. “Call it a classic case of supply meeting demand. Universities, colleges, even community colleges insist that faculty publish scholarly research, and the more papers the better. Academics and the schools they teach at rely on these publications to bolster their reputations, and with an oversupply of Ph.D.’s vying for jobs, careers hang in the balance.”

Science Magazine: German researchers resign from Elsevier journals in push for nationwide open access

Science Magazine: German researchers resign from Elsevier journals in push for nationwide open access. “Five leading German scientists have resigned from their editorial positions at journals published by Elsevier, the latest step in a battle over open-access and subscription policies between the Dutch publishing giant and a consortium of German libraries, universities, and research institutes. The researchers want Elsevier to accept a new payment model that would make all papers authored by Germany-based researchers open access. The five are only the first of many ready to step down, warn leaders of the consortium, called Projekt DEAL.”

Nature: Wikipedia shapes language in science papers

Nature: Wikipedia shapes language in science papers. “Wikipedia is one of the world’s most popular websites, but scientists rarely cite it in their papers. Despite this, the online encyclopedia seems to be shaping the language that researchers use in papers, according to an experiment showing that words and phrases in recently published Wikipedia articles subsequently appeared more frequently in scientific papers.”