EurekAlert: Arcadia Fund supports Plazi in its endeavor to rediscover known biodiversity

EurekAlert: Arcadia Fund supports Plazi in its endeavor to rediscover known biodiversity. “The Swiss-based Plazi NGO has received a grant of EUR 1.5 million from Arcadia Fund – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin – to further develop its Biodiversity Literature Repository (BLR) established in collaboration with Zenodo, the open science repository hosted and managed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), and the open-access scholarly publisher and technology provider Pensoft.”

The Conversation: Language matters when Googling controversial people

The Conversation: Language matters when Googling controversial people. “Our recent research showed how Google’s search engine normalizes conspiracy theorists, hate figures and other controversial people by offering neutral and even sometimes positive subtitles. We used virtual private networks (VPNs) to conceal our locations and hide our browsing histories to ensure that search results were not based on our geographical location or search histories. We found, for example, that Alex Jones, ‘the most prolific conspiracy theorist in contemporary America,’ is defined as an ‘American radio host,’ while David Icke, who is also known for spreading conspiracies, is described as a ‘former footballer.’”

University of Washington: Model finds COVID-19 deaths among elderly may be due to genetic limit on cell division

University of Washington: Model finds COVID-19 deaths among elderly may be due to genetic limit on cell division. “Your immune system’s ability to combat COVID-19, like any infection, largely depends on its ability to replicate the immune cells effective at destroying the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the disease. These cloned immune cells cannot be infinitely created, and a key hypothesis of a new University of Washington study is that the body’s ability to create these cloned cells falls off significantly in old age.”

Daily Bruin: Researchers study efficacy of digital flashcards among college students

Daily Bruin: Researchers study efficacy of digital flashcards among college students. “According to the study published April 7, digital flashcards have become increasingly popular over the past two decades, with one of the most well-known digital flashcard platforms, Quizlet, hosting more than 50 million active users per month. However, despite their widespread popularity, there is little research on how and why digital flashcards are used, said Steven Pan, the senior author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow alumnus in psychology.”

UW Study: Most Teens Actually Have Healthy Relationship With Digital Technology (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

University of Wisconsin-Madison: UW Study: Most Teens Actually Have Healthy Relationship With Digital Technology. “The large, nationwide study was led by Dr. Megan Moreno, professor of pediatrics and head of the Social Media and Adolescent Health Research Team at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and adolescent health physician, UW Health Kids. Researchers looked at the digital media use and family dynamics of nearly 4,000 pairs, each consisting of a parent and a teen. They found that about 63% of teens fell into the ‘family engaged’ group and had a healthy relationship with technology. The other 37% were categorized as ‘at risk.’”

Carnegie Mellon University: Over the Lips, Through the Gums, Look Out Gamers, Here It Comes — Or So It Seems

Carnegie Mellon University: Over the Lips, Through the Gums, Look Out Gamers, Here It Comes — Or So It Seems. “Lips are famously sensual but, together with the gums and tongue, they are also surprisingly sensitive, second only to the fingertips in nerve density. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have exploited this latter characteristic to devise a practical way for people to receive tactile feedback in virtual worlds. Their system uses airborne ultrasound waves to create sensations on the lips, teeth and tongue, and is small and light enough to attach to the bottom of virtual reality (VR) goggles.”

Ars Technica: Terahertz imaging reveals hidden inscription on 16th-century funerary cross

Ars Technica: Terahertz imaging reveals hidden inscription on 16th-century funerary cross. “In recent years, a variety of cutting-edge non-destructive imaging methods have proved to be a boon to art conservationists and archaeologists alike. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. For instance, ground-penetrating radar (radio waves) is great for locating buried artifacts, among other uses, while lidar is useful for creating high-resolution maps of surface terrain. Infrared reflectography is well-suited to certain artworks whose materials contain pigments that reflect a lot of infrared light.”

World Economic Forum: Which countries spend the most time on social media?

World Economic Forum: Which countries spend the most time on social media?. “On average, global internet users spend 2 hours and 27 minutes on social media per day, though trends differ widely by country. In many of the markets that Global Web Index surveyed, social media use had shrunk or plateaued in Q1 2020 when compared with 2019 and 2018 figures, but the coronavirus pandemic reversed this trend in many countries.”

Pew: How parents’ views of their kids’ screen time, social media use changed during COVID-19

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): How parents’ views of their kids’ screen time, social media use changed during COVID-19. “In April 2021, the Center followed up with many of the same parents we surveyed in March 2020 to check in on their children’s use of technology and social media during the pandemic. This second survey focused on parents who had a kid age 11 or younger in 2020, and it was fielded at a time when some schools were temporarily reverting to virtual learning and vaccines were not yet approved for children under 12. Below, we take a closer look at what these parents told us about their young child, including how the experiences they reported in 2021 compared with their responses from 2020.”

Outage outrage: Facebook outage may reveal depth of social media dependency (PennState)

PennState: Outage outrage: Facebook outage may reveal depth of social media dependency. “In a study of user reactions to a six-hour Facebook outage in the fall of 2021, the researchers said that members of the site flooded rival Twitter with nearly a quarter million tweets about the outage, quickly making #facebookdown a top trending topic. While many comments reflected anger about the situation and others ridiculed Facebook, users also expressed a need to find other social media outlets, according to S. Shyam Sundar, James P. Jimirro Professor of Media Effects in the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications and co-director of the Media Effects Research Laboratory at Penn State.”

ROADMAPS: An online database of response data, dosing regimens, and toxicities of approved oncology drugs as single agents to guide preclinical in vivo studies (Cancer Research)

Cancer Research: ROADMAPS: An online database of response data, dosing regimens, and toxicities of approved oncology drugs as single agents to guide preclinical in vivo studies. “The Biological Testing Branch (BTB) of the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) has evaluated more than 70 FDA-approved oncology drugs to date in human xenograft models. Here, we report the first release of a publicly available, downloadable spreadsheet, ROADMAPS (Responses to Oncology Agents and Dosing in Models to Aid Preclinical Studies)… that provides data filterable by agent, dose, dosing schedule, route of administration, tumor models tested, responses, host mouse strain, maximum weight loss, drug related deaths, and vehicle formulation for preclinical experiments conducted by the BTB.”