Indiana University: New center for AI, machine-learning research dedicated at IU Bloomington

Indiana University: New center for AI, machine-learning research dedicated at IU Bloomington. “The initial focus of the Luddy Center for AI, which will open in August, will include robotics, complex networks, health and social media. The center will draw upon the strength of researchers at the Luddy School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering, as well as collaborators from IU’s extensive range of health and life science schools, departments and programs.”

Making climate impact science more accessible to the public: ISIpedia launch (Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)

Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research: Making climate impact science more accessible to the public: ISIpedia launch. “The name ISIpedia is a short form for Inter-Sectoral Impacts Encyclopedia. It is based on research carried out under the Inter-sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) which is working with roughly 100 research groups worldwide. By systematically comparing the different computer simulations of climate impacts, the project is working towards consistent robust projections of climate change impacts across different sectors and scales. The ISIpedia portal is free, open-access and professional users can download the processed data used in the analyses as well as the raw data.”

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: NIH Disaster Research Response program launches new website

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: NIH Disaster Research Response program launches new website. “For more than 20 years, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has played a lead role in our nation’s health research following oil spills, hurricanes, and other environmental calamities. Now, the institute is providing a new home for the Disaster Research Response (DR2) program and its vast collection of web-based resources needed for scientists to conduct vital and timely public health research in the aftermath of disasters. More than 500 curated research tools and resources are now organized into an easy-to-use online portal, available on the NIEHS website free of charge.”

Cornell Chronicle: Online game replicates frustrations of research and disability

Cornell Chronicle: Online game replicates frustrations of research and disability. “‘There are micro-moments in the archive where your privilege and positionality take you along a different research route,’ said Julia Chang, assistant professor of Spanish studies in the Romance Studies Department, College of Arts and Sciences, describing not just experiences she and other researchers have had in archives, but also a moment programmed into an online, text-based game she developed this year with an undergraduate researcher.”

The Straits Times: Singapore researchers invent new AI tool that could speed up diagnosis of heart disease

The Straits Times: Singapore researchers invent new AI tool that could speed up diagnosis of heart disease . “A new tool that could lead to faster diagnosis of heart disease has been invented by researchers in Singapore. Powered by artificial intelligence (AI), it uses electrocardiograms (ECGs) and has an accuracy rate of 98.5 percent. ECGs measure the electrical activity of heartbeats to detect heart abnormalities.”

University of Sydney: World-first multiple sclerosis global image database launched

University of Sydney: World-first multiple sclerosis global image database launched. “The new MSBase Imaging Repository (MSBIR) integrates state-of-the-art informatics with an AI analytics engine, fostering a new generation of imaging biomarkers for precision monitoring of MS. It is designed to securely house raw de-identified imaging data for MS patients from multiple sites globally that can be accessed by registered contributing research groups, bringing capacity and scalability to clinical MS imaging research.”

UPI: Massive data-sharing effort to help doctors diagnose rare diseases across Europe

UPI: Massive data-sharing effort to help doctors diagnose rare diseases across Europe. “Doctors and medical researchers in Europe have undertaken a massive data-sharing project they hope will aid the diagnosis of rare disease. In a series of papers, published Tuesday in the European Journal of Human Genetics, researchers demonstrated how reanalysis of genomic and phenotypic data from patients with rare diseases — when combined with wide-scale data sharing — can increased the odds of accurate diagnosis.”

BetaKit: Biobox Analytics Launches Platform To Help Scientists Analyze Genomic Data

BetaKit: Biobox Analytics Launches Platform To Help Scientists Analyze Genomic Data. “Founded in 2019 by a trio of University of Toronto graduate students including [Christopher] Li, Hamza Farooq, and Julian Mazzitelli, BioBox offers a subscription-based data analytics platform for scientists working with next-generation sequencing data. The startup’s platform allows researchers to analyze genomic information.”

Commonwealth of Nations: New funding database for ocean action

Commonwealth of Nations: New funding database for ocean action. “The Commonwealth Secretariat has launched an online database to help member countries be aware of and access more than US$170 million of international funding available for ocean-related projects. Accompanying this new web tool is a handbook containing valuable guidance on how to navigate the database, as well as match and pitch projects to the most suitable funders.”

Chemistry World: Publishers grapple with an invisible foe as huge organised fraud hits scientific journals

Chemistry World: Publishers grapple with an invisible foe as huge organised fraud hits scientific journals. “While plagiarism and fraud isn’t new – individual researchers have been caught photoshopping electron microscopy images or inventing elemental analysis data – paper mills serve up professional fakery for their customers on an industrial scale. Buyers can apparently purchase a paper, or authorship of one, on any topic based on phony results to submit to a journal. This makes them not only harder to detect and crack down on, but also exponentially increases the damage they could do.”

Transparency International: Lack Of Transparency Over Vaccine Trials, Secretive Contracts And ‘science By Press Release’ Risk Success Of Global Covid-19 Response

Transparency International: Lack Of Transparency Over Vaccine Trials, Secretive Contracts And ‘science By Press Release’ Risk Success Of Global Covid-19 Response. “For Whose Benefit? is an in-depth study of the development and sale of the world’s top 20 COVID-19 vaccines, including those developed by AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech. Through detailed analysis of clinical trial data and nearly 200 contracts for vaccine sales up to March 2021, the report reveals a pattern of poor transparency and a disturbing trend of governments censoring key details of their orders from drug companies.”