Boston Globe: Chan Zuckerberg philanthropy taps UMass Amherst to create AI scientific research tool

Boston Globe: Chan Zuckerberg philanthropy taps UMass Amherst to create AI scientific research tool. “A philanthropy started by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan has awarded a $5.5 million grant to the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s Center for Data Science to create a free tool that would make millions of published scientific and medical findings easily accessible to researchers worldwide. The project, called Computable Knowledge, would use a branch of artificial intelligence known as knowledge representation and reasoning to create a navigable map of scientific findings from millions of new and historical research articles. The project aims to help scientists stay current on new research and to make it easier to find previously unknown connections between findings in genetics, diseases, drugs, and treatments.”

MIT Technology Review: China Publishes More Scientific Articles Than the U.S.

MIT Technology Review: China Publishes More Scientific Articles Than the U.S.. “According to the National Science Foundation, China published over 426,000 research papers in 2016. America pumped out almost 409,000. If you consider the number of citations for those papers, a measure of the influence they have in the scientific community, America does better—it placed third internationally, while China comes in fifth (Sweden and Switzerland took the top spots).”

Columbia University: New Tracker Keeps Tabs on Government Attacks on Science

Columbia University: New Tracker Keeps Tabs on Government Attacks on Science. “The tracker is aimed at documenting government attempts to restrict or prevent scientific research, education, discussion or publication. It currently contains 96 entries drawn from media reports, and links to other resources that complement the database. The tracker organizes attacks into specific categories: government censorship (currently 41 entries); personnel changes (20); budget cuts (15); self-censorship (11); bias and misrepresentation (8); and research hindrance (5). (Some entries are listed under more than one category.) The tracker will be updated on an ongoing basis.” Currently the site only tracks federal-level actions, but state-level actions are for the future.

Guerrilla FOIAfare: How to use exemption codes to find the most interesting documents hidden in the CIA archives (MuckRock)

MuckRock: Guerrilla FOIAfare: How to use exemption codes to find the most interesting documents hidden in the CIA archives . “As many researchers have learned over the years, government agencies in general and the Central Intelligence Agency in particular often apply exemptions very broadly, and at times, bordering on the ridiculous. Exemption codes, on the other hand, can still be useful to researchers, journalists, and curious citizens – by searching for these codes, clever researchers can find documents that discuss war plans, cryptography, WMDs, and diplomatically damaging information.”

Phys.org: New artificial intelligence index tracks the emerging field

Phys.org: New artificial intelligence index tracks the emerging field. “Since the term “artificial intelligence” (AI) was first used in print in 1956, the one-time science fiction fantasy has progressed to the very real prospect of driverless cars, smartphones that recognize complex spoken commands and computers that see. In an effort to track the progress of this emerging field, a Stanford-led group of leading AI thinkers called the AI100 has launched an index that will provide a comprehensive baseline on the state of artificial intelligence and measure technological progress in the same way the gross domestic product and the S&P 500 index track the U.S. economy and the broader stock market.

New Year, New You: A Digital Scholarship Guide (in seven parts!) (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New Year, New You: A Digital Scholarship Guide (in seven parts!). “To get 2018 going in a positive digital direction, we are releasing a guide for working with digital resources. Every Wednesday for the next seven weeks a new part of the guide will be released on The Signal. The guide covers what digital archives and digital humanities are trying to achieve, how to create digital documents, metadata and text-encoding, digital content and citation management, data cleaning methods, an introduction to working in the command line, text and visual analysis tools and techniques, and a list of people, blogs, and digital scholarship labs to follow to learn more about the topic. If you need all of this information immediately, feel free to binge on the full guide, available now in PDF. (No spoilers!)”