Bellingcat: These are the Tools Open Source Researchers Say They Need

Bellingcat: These are the Tools Open Source Researchers Say They Need. “Researchers told us that the tools they are most likely to use need to be free, clearly describing what they are capable of doing and how they can be used. Given that only a quarter of our respondents knew how to use the command line, tools which do not require more advanced technical skills are particularly welcome. Nearly 200 of our respondents provided concrete suggestions for tools which could help them in their work, which we have provided in a publicly-accessible spreadsheet.”

NiemanLab: How science helps fuel a culture of misinformation

NiemanLab: How science helps fuel a culture of misinformation. “Institutions often incentivize scientists going for tenure to focus on quantity rather than quality of publications and to exaggerate study results beyond the bounds of rigorous analysis. Scientific journals themselves can boost their revenue when they are more widely read. Thus, some journals may pounce on submissions with juicy titles that will attract readers. At the same time, many scientific articles contain more jargon than ever, which encourages misinterpretation, political spin, and a declining public trust in the scientific process. Addressing scientific misinformation requires top-down changes to promote accuracy and accessibility, starting with scientists and the scientific publishing process itself.”

New York Times: Another Firing Among Google’s A.I. Brain Trust, and More Discord

New York Times: Another Firing Among Google’s A.I. Brain Trust, and More Discord. “Less than two years after Google dismissed two researchers who criticized the biases built into artificial intelligence systems, the company has fired a researcher who questioned a paper it published on the abilities of a specialized type of artificial intelligence used in making computer chips.”

KelloggInsight: When a Bunch of Economists Look at the Same Data, Do They All See It the Same Way?

KelloggInsight: When a Bunch of Economists Look at the Same Data, Do They All See It the Same Way?. “Data can be messy, notoriously so. And so scientists and researchers have developed reams of strategies for cleaning and analyzing and ultimately harnessing data to draw conclusions. But this unusual study—an analysis of 164 separate analyses—suggests that the decisions that go into choosing how to clean the datasets, analyze them, and come to a conclusion can in fact add just as much noise as the data themselves.”

The Verge: Meta has a ‘moral obligation’ to make its mental health research transparent, scientists say

The Verge: Meta has a ‘moral obligation’ to make its mental health research transparent, scientists say. “In an open letter to Mark Zuckerberg published Monday, a group of academics called for Meta to be more transparent about its research into how Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp affect the mental health of children and adolescents. The letter calls for the company to allow independent reviews of its internal work, contribute data to external research projects, and set up an independent scientific oversight group.”

The Verge: Facebook shut down German research on Instagram algorithm, researchers say

The Verge: Facebook shut down German research on Instagram algorithm, researchers say. “Researchers at AlgorithmWatch say they were forced to abandon their research project monitoring the Instagram algorithm after legal threats from Facebook. The Berlin-based project went public with the conflict in a post published Friday morning, citing the platform’s recent ban of the NYU Ad Observatory.”

Tech Xplore: AI researchers trust international, scientific organizations most, study finds

Tech Xplore: AI researchers trust international, scientific organizations most, study finds. “Researchers working in the areas of machine learning and artificial intelligence trust international and scientific organizations the most to shape the development and use of AI in the public interest. But who do they trust the least? National militaries, Chinese tech companies and Facebook.”

Fermilab: Scientific publishing organizations and national laboratories partner on transgender-inclusive name-change process for published papers

Fermilab: Scientific publishing organizations and national laboratories partner on transgender-inclusive name-change process for published papers. “All 17 U.S. national laboratories and many prominent publishers, journals and other organizations in scientific publishing announced today the beginning of a partnership to support name change requests from researchers on past published papers. Previously, individual researchers shouldered the burden, administratively and emotionally, of initiating name-change requests with each publisher of their past papers…. This partnership streamlines these previously ad hoc processes and offers an official validation mechanism to all involved by enabling researchers to ask their respective institutions to pursue name changes on their behalf directly with the publishers and journals.”

Cornell Chronicle: Online game replicates frustrations of research and disability

Cornell Chronicle: Online game replicates frustrations of research and disability. “‘There are micro-moments in the archive where your privilege and positionality take you along a different research route,’ said Julia Chang, assistant professor of Spanish studies in the Romance Studies Department, College of Arts and Sciences, describing not just experiences she and other researchers have had in archives, but also a moment programmed into an online, text-based game she developed this year with an undergraduate researcher.”

Digiday : Facebook is ‘not a researchers-friendly space’ say academics encountering roadblocks to analyzing its 2020 election ad data

Digiday: Facebook is ‘not a researchers-friendly space’ say academics encountering roadblocks to analyzing its 2020 election ad data. “Facebook is providing academic researchers with a massive data haul revealing how political ads during last year’s U.S. elections were targeted to people on the platform. However, researchers have been held up by an arduous process to access the data and worry the information is insufficient to provide meaningful analysis of how Facebook’s ad platform was used —and potentially misused — leading up to the election.”

Nature: Why some researchers oppose unrestricted sharing of coronavirus data

Nature: Why some researchers oppose unrestricted sharing of coronavirus data. “Researchers around the world are racing to spot variants of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 so that they can determine whether the mutated viruses will evade vaccines or make COVID-19 deadlier. Like many scientists, Ndodo shares SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences in a popular data repository, GISAID, that requires users to sign in and to credit those whose data they analyse. But a growing faction of scientists, mostly from wealthy nations, argues that sequences should be shared on databases with no gatekeeping at all.”

EurekAlert: Announcing the launch of Global Africa, a new African academic journal

EurekAlert: Announcing the launch of Global Africa, a new African academic journal. “With Global Africa, the UGB’s LASPAD (Laboratoire d’analyse des sociétés et pouvoirs / Afrique – Diasporas) aims to report on political, social, economic, environmental, and technological issues, both in Africa and around the world…. Alongside the journal, training courses will be offered to improve the African research production and dissemination ecosystem. These will include online classes on preparing and publishing articles for both researchers and publishing professionals, as well as pop-up seminars for young researchers, helping to grow the community of authors interested in the journal’s key topics.”

Platforms vs. PhDs: How tech giants court and crush the people who study them (Protocol)

Protocol: Platforms vs. PhDs: How tech giants court and crush the people who study them. “Over the last few years, amid mounting scrutiny of Silicon Valley, tech platforms have made overtures to the research community, opening up previously inaccessible data sets that academics can use to study how tech platforms impact society…. But even as this work progresses, tech companies are simultaneously cracking down on academics whose methods break their rules.”

Ars Technica: Critical 0-day that targeted security researchers gets a patch from Microsoft

Ars Technica: Critical 0-day that targeted security researchers gets a patch from Microsoft. “Microsoft has patched a critical zero-day vulnerability that North Korean hackers were using to target security researchers with malware. The in-the-wild attacks came to light in January in posts from Google and Microsoft. Hackers backed by the North Korean government, both posts said, spent weeks developing working relationships with security researchers. To win the researchers’ trust, the hackers created a research blog and Twitter personas who contacted researchers to ask if they wanted to collaborate on a project.”