Bloomberg: One-third of U.S. restaurants facing permanent closure, forecast says

Bloomberg: One-third of U.S. restaurants facing permanent closure, forecast says. “As many as 231,000 of the nation’s roughly 660,000 eateries will likely shut down this year, according to an estimate from restaurant consultancy Aaron Allen & Associates provided to Bloomberg News. This will bring the industry’s steady growth to a halt and mark the first time in two decades that U.S. restaurant counts don’t climb. Restaurants have already shed millions of jobs this year, economic data show.”

As Restaurants And Bars Reopen, Servers Worry They Could Catch Coronavirus: ‘There Are No Safety Nets For Me’ (Block Club Chicago)

Block Club Chicago: As Restaurants And Bars Reopen, Servers Worry They Could Catch Coronavirus: ‘There Are No Safety Nets For Me’. “The city entered Phase 3 of reopening from coronavirus on June 3, allowing restaurants to open for patio service with strict safety precautions. Bars and breweries can join them in reopening as of Wednesday. But obedience to these guidelines — requiring guests wear face masks when not eating and social distance — has been mixed, which has servers like Alicia Rottman concerned about returning to work.”

New York Times: Can Anyone Save New York’s Bars and Restaurants?

New York Times: Can Anyone Save New York’s Bars and Restaurants?. “I have worked in the restaurant industry for 41 years, as a server, a bartender and, for the past 22 years, an owner. We have weathered upheavals, 9/11, the downturn of 2008 and Hurricane Sandy. But the food and beverage service industry has been hit harder than almost any other in this pandemic, accounting for 60 percent of the jobs lost in March. Those are unprecedented numbers, and none of us has ever seen anything like the troubles looming on the horizon for our industry, particularly for smaller, independent owners like me.”

BuzzFeed News: Grubhub Collected Record Fees From Restaurants Struggling To Stay Alive During The Pandemic

BuzzFeed News: Grubhub Collected Record Fees From Restaurants Struggling To Stay Alive During The Pandemic. “Restaurant owners have long complained that fees charged by ordering platforms like Grubhub, often ranging from 15% to 30%, make orders less profitable, and sometimes unprofitable — but businesses have no choice but to use them if they want to retain customers. They also discovered Grubhub was secretly buying up thousands of restaurant domain names and using them to build shadow websites that competed with pages operated by restaurants. Now, with dining rooms closed and lockdowns still in effect, takeout orders facilitated by platforms like Gruhub have become a crucial source of business.”