New York Times: Before Clearview Became a Police Tool, It Was a Secret Plaything of the Rich

New York Times: Before Clearview Became a Police Tool, It Was a Secret Plaything of the Rich . “Those with Clearview logins used facial recognition at parties, on dates and at business gatherings, giving demonstrations of its power for fun or using it to identify people whose names they didn’t know or couldn’t recall.”

New York Times: How the Superrich Took Over the Museum World

New York Times: How the Superrich Took Over the Museum World. “MoMA is a prime example. Of its 51 trustees who have a vote, at least 45 (by my count) work in finance, the corporate world, real estate or law, or are the heirs or spouses of the superrich. Only a handful come from outside these gilded ranks, among them the writer and actress Anna Deavere Smith and the Harvard professor of history and race Khalil Gibran Muhammad. As has been widely reported, both MoMA and the Met expect wealthy newcomers to give millions of dollars as the price of membership. (Because donations to museums are for the most part tax-deductible, the giving is leavened with a sizable dose of self-interest.)”

The Wall Street Journal: How the 1% Scrubs Its Image Online

The Wall Street Journal: How the 1% Scrubs Its Image Online. “Prominent figures from Jacob Gottlieb to Betsy DeVos got help from a reputation management firm that can bury image-sensitive Google results by placing flattering content on websites that masquerade as news outlets.”

Neowin: Mark Zuckerberg becomes the third-richest person alive as Facebook stock hits all-time high

Neowin: Mark Zuckerberg becomes the third-richest person alive as Facebook stock hits all-time high . “Zuckerberg’s net worth is now $81.6 billion, around $373 million more than Buffett. The Facebook CEO’s worth has risen by around $19 billion in a little over three months, after a steady downfall in the wake of the data privacy scandal, days before the comeback. This is also the first time that the three wealthiest people on the ranking list have made their wealth from technology, with Buffet’s industrial sector being listed as ‘Diversified’.”

New York Times: Millions of Leaked Files Shine Light on Where the Elite Hide Their Money

New York Times: Millions of Leaked Files Shine Light on Where the Elite Hide Their Money. “It’s called the Paradise Papers: the latest in a series of leaks made public by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists shedding light on the trillions of dollars that move through offshore tax havens. The core of the leak, totaling more than 13.4 million documents, focuses on the Bermudan law firm Appleby, a 119-year old company that caters to blue chip corporations and very wealthy people. Appleby helps clients reduce their tax burden; obscure their ownership of assets like companies, private aircraft, real estate and yachts; and set up huge offshore trusts that in some cases hold billions of dollars.”

Bloomberg: Rich People Would Consider Google, Amazon to Manage Their Wealth

Bloomberg: Rich People Would Consider Google, Amazon to Manage Their Wealth. “Forget traditional wealth management firms. If Google, Apple, Facebook or Amazon offered financial services, more than half of rich people might sign up. Consulting firm Capgemini found that 56.2 percent of high-net-worth individuals would think about working with one of the four technology firms if they offered wealth management services, according to its World Wealth Report 2017.”