New York Times: Your Doorbell Camera Spied on You. Now What?

New York Times: Your Doorbell Camera Spied on You. Now What?. “Based on the gaping security holes in this home security product, I personally wouldn’t recommend buying a Ring device. Yet millions of the cameras, which range from about $100 to $500, have been sold, and tens of thousands of customers have left glowing reviews for Ring products on Amazon…. I tested a Ring peephole camera, which involved installing the device on my door and creating an account with an email address and a password, to come up with a guide to ensuring your surveillance camera does not turn into a device that surveils you.”

The Verge: Ring cameras can help you spy on your neighbors, but they haven’t really helped police

The Verge: Ring cameras can help you spy on your neighbors, but they haven’t really helped police. “Ring’s security devices are advertised as a way to have peace of mind about your home, and the company’s work with law enforcement to provide additional security is well-documented. But two recent stories about the Amazon-owned company demonstrate how its security cameras can distort your view of how much crime actually takes place near your house and how they may not actually help police solve crimes at all.”

TechCrunch: Ring’s new security ‘control center’ isn’t nearly enough

TechCrunch: Ring’s new security ‘control center’ isn’t nearly enough. “On the same day that a Mississippi family is suing Amazon -owned smart camera maker Ring for not doing enough to prevent hackers from spying on their kids, the company has rolled out its previously announced ‘control center,’ which it hopes will make you forget about its verifiably ‘awful’ security practices.”

EFF: Ring Doorbell App Packed with Third-Party Trackers

EFF: Ring Doorbell App Packed with Third-Party Trackers. “An investigation by EFF of the Ring doorbell app for Android found it to be packed with third-party trackers sending out a plethora of customers’ personally identifiable information (PII). Four main analytics and marketing companies were discovered to be receiving information such as the names, private IP addresses, mobile network carriers, persistent identifiers, and sensor data on the devices of paying customers.”

Mashable: Ring admits its employees tried to access customers’ private video

Mashable: Ring admits its employees tried to access customers’ private video. “We knew hackers were creeping on Ring video feeds, but Ring’s own employees? In a Jan. 6 letter addressed to five U.S. Senators, Amazon-owned Ring admitted that, yes, an unspecified small number of employees have at least tried to inappropriately access customers’ home surveillance videos. Which, well, damn.”

Vox Recode: Simple changes to Amazon’s Ring could protect users from hacks

Vox Recode: Simple changes to Amazon’s Ring could protect users from hacks. “Ring’s defense misses the point and is a disservice to its customers. Yes, it’s important to know that the hack wasn’t a breach of Ring’s internal systems, but that is unlikely to prevent such hacks from continuing to happen. Rather than dismissing the incident and putting the blame on users, the company could roll out a simple change that privacy experts have long advocated for on just about any service or product that requires a login: mandatory two-factor authentication.”

BuzzFeed News: A Data Leak Exposed The Personal Information Of Over 3,000 Ring Users

BuzzFeed News: A Data Leak Exposed The Personal Information Of Over 3,000 Ring Users. “Using the log-in email and password, an intruder could access a Ring customer’s home address, telephone number, and payment information, including the kind of card they have, and its last four digits and security code. An intruder could also access live camera footage from all active Ring cameras associated with an account, as well as a 30- to 60-day video history, depending on the user’s cloud storage plan.”

Motherboard: Inside the Podcast that Hacks Ring Camera Owners Live on Air

Motherboard: Inside the Podcast that Hacks Ring Camera Owners Live on Air. “The NulledCast is a podcast livestreamed to Discord. It’s a show in which hackers take over people’s Ring and Nest smarthome cameras and use their speakers to talk to and harass their unsuspecting owners. In the example above, Chance blared noises and shouted racist comments at the Florida family.”

CNET: Ring let police view map of video doorbell installations for over a year

CNET: Ring let police view map of video doorbell installations for over a year. “For more than a year, police departments partnered with Amazon’s Ring unit had access to a map showing where its video doorbells were installed, down to the street, public documents revealed. So while Ring said it didn’t provide police with addresses for the devices, a feature in the map tool let them get extremely close. The feature was removed in July.”

Amazon: Cops Can Get Recordings From Ring, Keep Them Forever, And Share Them With Whoever They Want (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Amazon: Cops Can Get Recordings From Ring, Keep Them Forever, And Share Them With Whoever They Want. “Since its introduction, Ring has been steadily increasing its market share — both with homeowners and their public servants. At the beginning of August, this partnership included 200 law enforcement agencies. Three months later, that number has increased to 630.”

BetaNews: Your Amazon Ring doorbell may have leaked your Wi-Fi username and password

BetaNews: Your Amazon Ring doorbell may have leaked your Wi-Fi username and password. “It has just been revealed that a security flaw in the camera-toting devices made it possible for hackers to access customers’ Wi-Fi usernames and passwords. With these credentials, it would then be possible to launch a wider privacy-invading attack on households, accessing all manner of data and devices on home networks.”

Ars Technica: Ring reportedly shared video sharing data, detailed maps with police in 2018

Ars Technica: Ring reportedly shared video sharing data, detailed maps with police in 2018. “Ring, Amazon’s home security camera and surveillance company, has since 2018 rapidly expanded its business by partnering with more than 400 police and sheriff departments nationwide. Amid a growing chorus of privacy complaints and media reports about these partnerships, Ring has repeatedly promised explicitly that police have no way of knowing details of who has the cameras installed and what residents are—or aren’t—willing to share their footage. New reports, however, indicate that police departments may be receiving more data about Ring users in their jurisdictions than previously disclosed.”

The Next Web: Map reveals which cities use Ring’s surveillance network to spy on you

The Next Web: Map reveals which cities use Ring’s surveillance network to spy on you. “An engineering student in Illinois has put together a handy map to help pinpoint locations where police are tapped into Ring’s surveillance network. Ring, a company best known for smart doorbells and home security cameras, has a massive network of these cameras installed, some of which are being used for surveillance purposes by police in certain cities.”

Ars Technica: Police can get your Ring doorbell footage without a warrant, report says

Ars Technica: Police can get your Ring doorbell footage without a warrant, report says. “Hundreds of police departments around the country have partnerships with Amazon’s home surveillance brand Ring. The relationship benefits both sides: the company provides tech and software to law enforcement, and the cops both provide data to Amazon and also help sell the product to local homeowners. That alone raises troubling issues, but according to a pair of new reports, Ring also gets access to real-time 911 data, and the company helps police work around a need for search warrants when looking for footage.”

The Intercept: For Owners Of Amazon’s Ring Security Cameras, Strangers May Have Been Watching Too

The Intercept: For Owners Of Amazon’s Ring Security Cameras, Strangers May Have Been Watching Too . “THE ‘SMART HOME’ of the 21st century isn’t just supposed to be a monument to convenience, we’re told, but also to protection, a Tony Stark-like bubble of vigilant algorithms and internet-connected sensors working ceaselessly to watch over us. But for some who’ve welcomed in Amazon’s Ring security cameras, there have been more than just algorithms watching through the lens, according to sources alarmed by Ring’s dismal privacy practices.”