FEMA: FEMA Launches National Risk Index Update

FEMA: FEMA Launches National Risk Index Update. “FEMA announced the full application launch of the National Risk Index, a new online resource that provides a clear, visual guide to natural hazard risks throughout the United States, and information to help communities to understand and reduce those risks, whether they involve flooding, wildfire, extreme heat, or drought.”

Finextra: Elucidate launches open database on financial crime risk scores

Finextra: Elucidate launches open database on financial crime risk scores. “During a time when financial crime scandals are increasingly common, the [Elucidate FinCrime Risk Monitor] looks to increase transparency in the finance industry. The EFRM evaluates more than 17000 financial institutions, with data sourced from the Elucidate FinCrime Index (EFI), the company’s regulated financial crime risk benchmark.”

‘The robot made me do it’: Robots encourage risk-taking behaviour in people (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: ‘The robot made me do it’: Robots encourage risk-taking behaviour in people. “New research has shown robots can encourage people to take greater risks in a simulated gambling scenario than they would if there was nothing to influence their behaviours. Increasing our understanding of whether robots can affect risk-taking could have clear ethical, practiCal and policy implications, which this study set out to explore.”

ProPublica: How Your Brain Tricks You Into Taking Risks During the Pandemic

ProPublica: How Your Brain Tricks You Into Taking Risks During the Pandemic. “Many months into the pandemic, even as the nation faces its highest average daily case counts to date, people still don’t agree on how to live in the era of COVID-19. We know how to protect ourselves — washing our hands, wearing masks and staying socially distant — but many people still take unnecessary risks, even at the highest levels of government.”

Rand Corporation: Learning to Live in a Riskier World

Rand Corporation: Learning to Live in a Riskier World. “On one hand, there are daily headlines expressing alarm about the dangers of reopening, citing rising cases and hospitalizations in early-opening states like Texas, Florida, and Arizona. The implication often seems to be not just that we should carefully consider how and when to reopen, but that returning to normalcy is not worth any increase in COVID-19 risk. On the other hand, some groups—such as the anti-mask activists who succeeded in temporarily getting mask requirements rescinded in Orange County—appear opposed to any restrictions or changes in their pre-COVID-19 lifestyles. But what Americans need right now is not polarization.”

Galway Bay FM: Researchers at NUI Galway co-create new online Coivd-19 tracing tool

Galway Bay FM: Researchers at NUI Galway co-create new online Coivd-19 tracing tool. “Researchers from NUIG have co- created a new tool that calculates a person’s risk of contracting and spreading Covid-19. The group of behavioural science experts from NUIG, Trinity College Dublin, UL and Queen’s University Belfast have collaborated with an international team of experts to develop ‘Your Covid-19 Risk’ – a website that aims to reduce the impact of COVID-19 on communities while providing researchers with valuable information.”

Fast Company: People are falling off buildings in search of the perfect Instagram shot

Fast Company: People are falling off buildings in search of the perfect Instagram shot. “A subculture has emerged in the past eight years of people who seek out death-defying situations–and they do it for the likes, followers, and adulation of fans on social media.” I have included articles like this before, but I’m adding this one because it’s a fairly deep dive with a lot of interesting bits I did not know (like the top four countries for selfie deaths.)

Emory University: Twitter reveals how future-thinking Americans are and how that affects their decisions

Emory University: Twitter reveals how future-thinking Americans are and how that affects their decisions. “Individuals who tend to think further into the future are more likely to invest money and to avoid risks, finds a new paper by psychologists at Emory University. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) published the research, which tapped big data tools to conduct text analyses of nearly 40,000 Twitter users, and to run online experiments of behavior of people who provided their Twitter handles.”