University of Massachusetts Amherst: Geoscientist Awarded $2.1m Grant To Create Global Open-source Software System For Tracking Water And Sediment In Earth’s Rivers Using NASA Satellite Data

University of Massachusetts Amherst: Geoscientist Awarded $2.1m Grant To Create Global Open-source Software System For Tracking Water And Sediment In Earth’s Rivers Using NASA Satellite Data. “University of Massachusetts geoscientist and engineer Colin Gleason has received a $2.1 NASA million grant to work with computer science colleagues at UMass Amherst and the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., to create a cloud-based software system providing unprecedented public access to satellite data on Earth’s water quantity and quality.”

The Conversation: Rivers can suddenly change course – scientists used 50 years of satellite images to learn where and how it happens

The Conversation: Rivers can suddenly change course – scientists used 50 years of satellite images to learn where and how it happens. “Throughout history, important cities around the world have flourished along river banks. But rivers can also be destructive forces. They routinely flood, and on rare occasions, they can abruptly shift pathways. These ‘channel-jumping’ events, which are called avulsions, have caused some of the deadliest floods in human history…. In a newly published study, I worked with colleagues to map the global distribution of avulsions on river fans and deltas. We used satellite images of over 100 rivers from 1973 to the present, providing a half-century of bird’s-eye views of global river evolution.”

Yale Environment 360: A New Tool Shows How Much Dams Will Alter River Temperatures, Threatening Native Fish

Yale Environment 360: A New Tool Shows How Much Dams Will Alter River Temperatures, Threatening Native Fish. “A new online tool reveals how more than 200 planned dams worldwide will alter river temperatures, potentially rendering waters too hot or too cold for native fish…. Scientists analyzed the impact of 100 existing dams to create a machine learning tool that would predict how much 216 planned dams will alter temperatures downstream.”

Navajo-Hopi Observer: Native voices share cultural ties to Little Colorado River

Navajo-Hopi Observer: Native voices share cultural ties to Little Colorado River. “A group of Native voices is kicking off Native American Heritage month with a new multimedia story collection that celebrates the Little Colorado River’s life-giving waters. ‘Lifeways of the Little Colorado River’ features personal narratives, videos, and audio stories from Indigenous sheepherders, scholars, farmers, musicians, activists, artists, and more.”

University of Texas at Austin: First Global River Database Documents 40 Years of Change

University of Texas at Austin: First Global River Database Documents 40 Years of Change. “The database, created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, uses publicly available remote sensing data to show how the river centerlines of the world’s 48 most threatened deltas have moved during the past 40 years. The data can be used to predict how rivers will continue to move over time and help governments manage population density and future development.”

No paddles needed: Ottawa River now navigable on Google Street View (CBC)

CBC: No paddles needed: Ottawa River now navigable on Google Street View. “You no longer need a boat and a lifejacket to traverse one stretch of the Ottawa River — just a good internet connection. Thanks to the efforts of The Ottawa Riverkeeper, an organization that advocates for the watershed, and Chelsea, Que., photographer Brian Redmond, a scenic stretch of the river that runs past Parliament Hill can now be navigated on Google Street View.”

Nerdist: This Tool Lets You See World’s 1,000 Most-Polluting Rivers

Nerdist: This Tool Lets You See World’s 1,000 Most-Polluting Rivers. “One of the biggest environmental disasters that needs to be addressed ASAP is the immense plastic pollution in the oceans. According to the nonprofit organization The Ocean Cleanup Project, the best way to do this is to tackle the incoming plastics at their source: rivers along coasts. With a new tool, the nonprofit allows people to see the 1,000 most-polluting rivers in the world; ones it aims to purify with its autonomous, plastic-collecting drone ships.”

Down to Earth: New database shows how large rivers form the basis of global borders

Down to Earth: New database shows how large rivers form the basis of global borders. “Rivers have historically provided humans with fresh water, fertile land and food and have, thus, formed the bedrock of several civilisations. A new database, however, quantified how rivers were used to divide land and form international, national and local borders. Rivers make up 23 per cent of international borders, 17 per cent of the world’s state and provincial borders and 12 per cent of all county-level local borders, according to the Global Subnational River-Borders database.” The dataset is available here.

McGill Newsroom: World’s most detailed database maps characteristics of Earth’s rivers and catchments

McGill Newsroom: World’s most detailed database maps characteristics of Earth’s rivers and catchments. “Two researchers and friends from opposite ends of the Earth have created a world-first high spatial resolution atlas that maps the environmental characteristics of all the globe’s rivers and catchments. HydroATLAS was co-developed by Bernhard Lehner and his team from McGill University’s Department of Geography and Simon Linke from Griffith University’s Australian Rivers Institute.”

Daily Excelsior: ‘How climate affects shape of rivers decoded’

Daily Excelsior: ‘How climate affects shape of rivers decoded’. “The study, published in the journal Nature, looked at changes in the path one makes when walking from a river’s source to its mouth as the stream descends in elevation — a measure called the ‘river long profile.’ … For the first time, the researchers have produced a new database of global river long profiles (GLoPro) which includes 333,502 rivers across the globe within one climate category.”

University of Wisconsin La Crosse: River record

University of Wisconsin La Crosse: River record . “For decades, Upper Mississippi River scientists have conducted stimulating research only to see it placed in a room at a laboratory in Onalaska, Wisconsin. Now with help from librarians at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Murphy Library that work is going viral. UWL Murphy Library staff are still scanning materials brought to the library in a truckload last August. So far they’ve scanned, cataloged and put online more than 26,000 pages of material and over 400 photographs.”

Atlas Obscura: An Artist, a Shantyboat, and the Lost History of American River Communities

Atlas Obscura: An Artist, a Shantyboat, and the Lost History of American River Communities. “THE RIVERS OF THE UNITED States have a certain lore and mystique within American culture. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, these roaring waterways were home to thousands. Entire communities existed on or near the water in self-made houseboats. The history of these communities has been explored briefly in river memoirs such as Harlan Hubbard’s Shantyboat Journal, but hasn’t been thoroughly examined in a present-day context. That is, until a modern shantyboat came bobbing down the Mississippi in the summer of 2014.”

Deep data: Oregon offers new online resource for potential flooding around the state (Register-Guard)

Register-Guard: Deep data: Oregon offers new online resource for potential flooding around the state. “Riverside property owners, anglers and others with interest in stream levels around Oregon have a new way to check for potential flooding. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management last month released a new online dashboard. The tool includes an interactive map and a list of how many stream gauges are expected to be nearing flood stage, or have minor flooding, moderate flooding or major flooding. As of early this week, no gauges around Oregon indicated flooding.”

Wired: They mined an Amsterdam river bed for long-lost objects

Wired: They mined an Amsterdam river bed for long-lost objects. “Rivers in cities are unlikely archaeological sites. It is not often that a riverbed, let alone one in the middle of a city, is pumped dry and can be systematically examined. The excavations in the Amstel yielded a deluge of finds, some 700,000 in all: a vast array of objects, some broken, some whole, all jumbled together.”