Government Technology: Little Vermont Uses Big Data to Predict Bridge Repairs and Traffic Jams

Government Technology: Little Vermont Uses Big Data to Predict Bridge Repairs and Traffic Jams. “Vermont may be a land of bucolic country roads. It is also a land of big data. State transportation engineers are using artificial intelligence, predictive analytics and even wonkier-sounding neural networks to better understand how roads and bridges might be deteriorating and in need of maintenance.”

WZZM: Website would list potholes dotting Michigan highways

WZZM: Website would list potholes dotting Michigan highways. “Want to avoid rim-busting potholes on your way into work? There may be an app for that. A house bill introduced this week calls for an online database that lists potholes on Michigan highways. While the Michigan Department of Transportation already takes pothole reports, a bill introduced by Rep. Leslie Love, D-Detroit, would put that information online.”

Global Times: Shanghai establishes database of historic alleys

Global Times: Shanghai establishes database of historic alleys. “Shanghai Municipal Bureau of Planning and Land Resources recently said a second census on place names is proceeding throughout the city in order to better understand the histories behind the names of historic alleys and set up a database for further protection, thepaper.cn reported Wednesday.”

ResponseSource: Historian uses Google Streetview to find Britain’s “lost” 1930s-era cycleways (PRESS RELEASE)

This is a press release from ResponseSource but it’s not very “press-releasy” – Historian uses Google Streetview to find Britain’s “lost” 1930s-era cycleways. “These cycleways were installed beside British roads between 1934 and 1940, but were abandoned after the Second World War. Many were surfaced with red concrete, protected cyclists with kerbs and extended for many miles. They were commissioned by the Ministry of Transport and were built on both sides of the arterial roads constructed in the 1930s. Author and historian Carlton Reid used archive sources to identify the likely locations for the cycleways, and then confirmed their existence not with field walks or even bike rides, but with Google Streetview.”

National Library of Scotland Puts 1923 Transport Road Maps Online

Pointed out by Steve D on Twitter, thanks man! The National Library of Scotland has put a 1923 set of transport road maps online. “This set of Ministry of Transport Road Maps, issued by the Ordnance Survey in 1923, were the first to accurately show the initial numbered roads in Scotland. The roads depicted on this set of maps are the Class I (red) roads showing important routes connecting large population centres or through roads, and the less important Class II (green) roads.”