Hyperallergic: Pompeii’s Long-buried Frescoes Come Back to Life

Hyperallergic: Pompeii’s Long-buried Frescoes Come Back to Life. “On that fateful day in August of 79 CE, when Pompeii was seized unawares by the sudden eruption of Mount Vesuvius, it abruptly transitioned from a living city to a still-capture of ancient life. Many explorations have been made to understand aspects of life in Pompeii, but a new online exhibition hosted by New York University (NYU) brings us a scintillating close read on the fresco art of the city’s villas. Titled Pompeii in Color, the exhibition is organized by the National Archeological Museum of Naples, and presents 35 frescoes, all originally from Roman homes.”

New York Times: A Vatican Library Shortens the Distance Between Its Works and Its Scholars

New York Times: A Vatican Library Shortens the Distance Between Its Works and Its Scholars. “Some of the texts at the [library of the Pontifical Oriental Institute], which over the years swelled to some 200,000 works, have just been digitized, and will soon be at the fingertips of a global audience — no voyages or ladders needed. The first digitized versions will be available to the public in mid-2022, the product of a charitable initiative that connected the institute with technology companies in the United States and Germany.”

Departures: New Virtual Experience Will Take You Back 2,000 Years to Visit Ancient Roman Ruins

Departures: New Virtual Experience Will Take You Back 2,000 Years to Visit Ancient Roman Ruins. “Virtual visitors can explore incredible landmarks like the 2,000-year-old Temple of Jupiter that’s perched on 3,000-ton stone blocks (it weighs more than the pillars of Stonehenge). The Temple of Bacchus—one of the best-preserved temples in the ancient world—is also on the Sanctuary tour. Those ruins are some of the most incredible examples of ancient architecture in the entire Roman empire. You’ll get to make a total of 35 stops along the virtual journey.”

Getty: See the Faces of People Who Lived in Egypt under the Roman Empire

Getty: See the Faces of People Who Lived in Egypt under the Roman Empire. “In Egypt, it was customary to mummify the deceased and create a likeness of them, often in the form of a mummy mask or an anthropoid (human-form) coffin. From the first to third centuries AD, after Egypt had become a province of the Roman Empire, the traditional practice of mummification continued but a new trend also arose: some individuals chose to be represented in portraits painted on thin wooden panels or linen burial shrouds that were affixed to their mummy wrappings. These mummy portraits were part of ancient Egyptian traditions and their preparations for the afterlife…. Discover more about these mummy portraits and the stories they tell, in the new Google Arts & Culture exhibition: Faces of Roman Egypt.”

American Academy in Rome: AAR Receives Major Gift of Photographs of Ancient Roman Sites by Carole Raddato

Thanks to Esther S. for sending this my way. From the American Academy in Rome: AAR Receives Major Gift of Photographs of Ancient Roman Sites by Carole Raddato. “The American Academy in Rome (AAR) announced that photographer Carole Raddato has gifted the core of her vast collection—some 30,000 digital images—to the AAR Library to ensure its long-term preservation and continued access to scholars. The gift represents the most important collection of images of antiquity to come to the Academy since Ernest Nash’s Fototeca Unione was formed in 1956, and is the first to consist of photos taken wholly in the twenty-first century.”

Virtual Volterra: Ancient Amphitheaters and Temples Recorded in 3D (LiveScience)

LiveScience: Virtual Volterra: Ancient Amphitheaters and Temples Recorded in 3D. “The mountaintop town of Volterra in central Italy witnessed the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Now, researchers are using the latest reality capture technology and software to preserve a 3D digital record of its ancient temples, theaters and other buildings for the future, and to gain new insights into how they were made…. Elements of the reality-capture project, including 3D models of the Etruscan arch and a stone pedestal from Volterra’s Roman theater, are also available to the public at a new website…”

Stanford: Thousands of Rome’s historical images digitized with help of Stanford researchers

Stanford: Thousands of Rome’s historical images digitized with help of Stanford researchers. “A team including Stanford researchers created a new digital archive to study Rome’s transformation over the centuries. The exhibit, which went online in the spring, consists of almost 4,000 digitized drawings, prints, photographs and sketches of historic Rome from the 16th to 20th centuries. The pieces were collected by renowned Roman archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani, who sought to document the entire history of Rome’s archeology up to the end of the 19th century.”

Forbes: Saving Endangered Data From Ancient Rome To Trump’s America

Forbes: Saving Endangered Data From Ancient Rome To Trump’s America. “From San Francisco to New York City, groups of scientists, librarians, researchers and concerned Americans have rushed to preserve federal data and citations that have begun to disappear from government websites. Such efforts have culminated in a series of independently organized events across the country dubbed Endangered Data Week. Believe it or not, this isn’t a new problem. Even in Ancient Rome, political leaders were fond of destroying records and documents that painted a picture of a reality they couldn’t accept.”

Vatican Digitizes 1600-Year-Old Edition of Virgil

The Vatican Library has digitized a 1600-year-old edition of Virgil. “Created in Rome around 400AD, the Vatican Virgil consists of 76 surviving pages, and 50 illustrations. The fragments of text are from the Latin poet’s Aeneid, his epic tale of Aeneas’s journey from the sack of Troy to Carthage, the underworld and then Italy, where he founds Rome. It also contains fragments from Virgil’s poem of the land, The Georgics, but the original manuscript is likely to have contained all of Virgil’s canonical works.”

Massive Digital Archive of 3D-Scanned Greek and Roman Sculpture In Development

In development: a massive digital archive of 3D-scanned Greek and Roman sculpture. “The project between the Uffizi, one of the oldest and most renowned art museums in the world, and IU’s Virtual World Heritage Laboratory will create high-resolution 3-D digital models of the Uffizi sculptures and make them freely available online by IU’s bicentennial in 2020. The Uffizi collection is located at the gallery as well as the Pitti Palace and Boboli Gardens, other famous cultural sites in Florence. The 1,250 works of art comprise the third largest collection of its kind in an Italian state museum. Largely assembled by the Medici family from the 15th to the 18th centuries, the sculptures include some of the most admired classical antiquities in the history of art, notably the Medici Venus, the Medici Faun, the Niobids and the Ariadne.”

Getty Publications Releases Two New Online Catalogues

Getty Publications has released another couple of online catalogues. “The publications released in this launch include Roman Mosaics in the J. Paul Getty Museum, a catalogue by Getty curator Alexis Belis that accompanies the exhibition Roman Mosaics across the Empire that is currently on display at the Getty Villa, and Ancient Terracottas from South Italy and Sicily in the J. Paul Getty Museum, a catalogue by noted archaeologist Maria Lucia Ferruzza in collaboration with Getty curator Claire Lyons.”