The Register: Google lobbies hard to derail new US privacy laws – using dodgy stats

The Register: Google lobbies hard to derail new US privacy laws – using dodgy stats. “As blowback against Facebook and its business model enters its third week, with netizens railing against the amount and type of personal data the social network has on them, calls for new privacy laws have started growing. And in response so has a secret lobbying effort, spearheaded by Google, to head those calls off at the pass.”

Malta Independent: IT Law Association extremely concerned over court judgements being deleted from online database

Malta Independent: IT Law Association extremely concerned over court judgements being deleted from online database. “The Malta IT Law Association (MITLA) has said that it is ‘extremely concerned’ about recent reports that private individuals have successfully requested that court cases decided against them be deleted from online court databases, ‘without having in place clear rules as to how the right to be forgotten is being exercised with respect to public registers.'”

Lovin Malta: It’s Official: You Can Now Get Your Online Court Judgments Deleted [Malta]

Lovin Malta: It’s Official: You Can Now Get Your Online Court Judgments Deleted [Malta]. “Pandora’s Box risks getting opened now that Justice Minister Owen Bonnici has confirmed people are allowed to request the deletion of their court records from the online database. This tool only became public today after it was successfully applied by a newly minted lawyer to delete a 2010 criminal sentence that conditionally discharged her for stealing a credit card. However, Bonnici said the tool has actually been in place since he was appointed minister 2014 and has been successfully applied around 12 times.” Just to be clear: this is MALTA, not the US.

The Times: Businessman sues Google to have his crime forgotten

The Times: Businessman sues Google to have his crime forgotten. “The claimant was convicted of conspiracy to account falsely in the late 1990s and wants the search engine to remove results that mention his case. He is ‘treated as a pariah in his personal, business and social life’ and has been “’unable to form any new friendships or personal relationships’ because of online newspaper articles about his conviction, according to court papers.”

Google Blog: Updating our “right to be forgotten” Transparency Report

Google Blog: Updating our “right to be forgotten” Transparency Report. “Today, we’re expanding the scope of our transparency reporting about the ‘right to be forgotten’ and adding new data going back to January 2016 when our reviewers started manually annotating each URL submitted to us with additional information…”

Bloomberg Quint: Google Braced for England’s First `Right to Be Forgotten’ Trial

Bloomberg Quint: Google Braced for England’s First `Right to Be Forgotten’ Trial. “Google Inc. is bracing itself for its first battle in England’s High Court over the so-called ‘right to be forgotten.’ Two anonymous people want the search engine to take down links to information about their old convictions. Both describe themselves in their court filings as businessmen. One was convicted of conspiracy to account falsely, and the other was convicted of conspiracy to intercept communications, but those convictions are spent, judge Matthew Nicklin told a pre-trial hearing Thursday.”

Wired: Google Fights Against Canada’s Order To Change Global Search Results

Wired: Google Fights Against Canada’s Order To Change Global Search Results. “IN JUNE, CANADA’S Supreme Court came down on Google—hard. It ruled that the tech giant must take down certain Google search results for pirated products. And not just in Canada, but globally. Now, Google is going south of the Canadian border to push back on this landmark court ruling. The tech giant filed an injunction Monday with the US District Court for Northern California, arguing that globally removing the search results violates US law, and thus Google should not be forced to comply with the Canadian ruling.”

CNET: Google ‘right to be forgotten’ case referred to top EU court

CNET: Google ‘right to be forgotten’ case referred to top EU court. “The European Union’s top court will decide whether or not Google is required to remove certain results from its iconic search engine. The crux of the matter is the so-called ‘right to be forgotten,’ a policy in Europe that lets people ask search engines to remove some results from queries of their own names. What’s in question isn’t the policy itself — Google already complies with it — but how far-reaching those de-listings should be.”

The Register: When we said don’t link to the article, Google, we meant DON’T LINK TO THE ARTICLE!

The Register: When we said don’t link to the article, Google, we meant DON’T LINK TO THE ARTICLE!. “A German court has given Google a hearty slap over its grudging response to ‘right to be forgotten’ laws, telling it that not linking to information means exactly that: not linking to information.”

Techdirt: Turkish President Demands Google Delist A Bunch Of Websites Comparing Him To Hitler

Techdirt:
Turkish President Demands Google Delist A Bunch Of Websites Comparing Him To Hitler
. “The world’s most thin-skinned ‘leader’ is at it again. Perpetually-insulted Turkish super-villain Recip Erdogan is still firing off court orders to Google, expecting the immediate banishment of anything he finds offensive.”

Phys .org: Japan court rejects ‘right to be forgotten’ on Google

Phys.org: Japan court rejects ‘right to be forgotten’ on Google. “Japan’s Supreme Court has rejected a man’s demand that news search results of his arrest on sex charges be deleted from Google, ruling that to do so would violate freedom of expression. Japanese media said it was the first decision by the nation’s top court involving the ‘right to be forgotten’ relating to Internet searches.”

Times of India – Can’t restrain law portal, Google from posting court orders online: Gujarat high court

From the Times of India: Can’t restrain law portal, Google from posting court orders online: Gujarat high court. “Justice RM Chhaya on Thursday turned down a petition filed by one Dharmraj Dave, who had urged the court to direct a law portal and tech-giant Google to delete an HC judgement from internet because such a public exhibition of the order might jeopardize his chances of migrating to Australia.”

From Google: Reflecting on the Right to be Forgotten

Google: Reflecting on the Right to be Forgotten. “What if links to stories about someone’s past – stories about defrauding an international business or about medical tourism malpractice – were removed from Google search in your country, not because of your local laws but because someone was able to use the laws of another country. How would you feel about that? That question may seem simplistic. But it goes to the heart of a very important debate that is taking place now in Europe, initially between some Data Protection Authorities and, next year, in court.”

Japanese Court Refuses to Order Man’s Arrest Record Removed From Google

Not the way it usually goes: a Japanese court has rejected a man’s request to have the record of his arrest removed from Google search results. “The Tokyo District Court dismissed on Friday a man’s claim demanding that Google Inc. remove a record of his arrest on a fraud charge more than 10 years ago in internet search results. Presiding Judge Katsuhiko Okazaki said in the ruling, ‘Leaving the fact of the arrest known at low cost serves the public interest.'”