Washington Post: Goodbye, Pushkin. Ukrainians target Russian street names, monuments.

Washington Post: Goodbye, Pushkin. Ukrainians target Russian street names, monuments.. “The onset of war has hastened Ukraine’s efforts to remove the names of famous Russian and Soviet figures from metro stations, streets and landmarks. There’s even an app. The only reason more Russian statues haven’t been toppled lately, [Serhii] Sternenko said, is that Ukrainians have been too busy fighting a war.”

Empty galleries and fleeing artists: Russia’s cultural uncoupling from the west (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Empty galleries and fleeing artists: Russia’s cultural uncoupling from the west . “On a recent Saturday in April, Muscovites strolled around GES-2, a vast new arts centre built in a disused power station steps away from the Kremlin. But guests visiting the 54,400-sq-metre centre, designed by the pioneering Italian architect Renzo Piano, were faced with one hard-to-miss problem: the art was absent. ‘It is not the time for contemporary art when people are dying and blood is spilling. We can’t pretend as if life is normal,’ said Evgeny Antufiev, a Russian artist who asked for his works to be removed from GES-2 shortly after Russia invaded Ukraine on 24 February.”

Ukrainian Institute: Call to suspend cultural cooperation with Russia and international presentation of Russian culture

Ukrainian Institute: Call to suspend cultural cooperation with Russia and international presentation of Russian culture. “The Ukrainian Institute reiterates its call to international and Ukrainian cultural institutions and individual professionals, academic community, and civil society organisations to suspend any cooperation with Russia. We consider this a necessary step to push back the aggressor that launched a violent and unjustified invasion against Ukraine, a sovereign and peaceful European country, and has long instrumentalised culture and soft power for political propaganda and manipulation of public opinion.”

Wall Street Journal: Russian Artists Feel a New Cultural Chill in the West

Wall Street Journal: Russian Artists Feel a New Cultural Chill in the West. “Vladimir Putin’s siege of Ukraine is forcing all types of cultural institutions to wrestle with their role as platforms for artists representing Russia, from current filmmakers and classical-music stars to timeless greats like Tchaikovsky. As governments enforce sanctions on the Russian government and corporations break with Russian businesses, arts groups are facing a similar question: Should they cut ties or not?”

Washington Post: A new iron curtain descends on Russia amid its invasion of Ukraine

Washington Post: A new iron curtain descends on Russia amid its invasion of Ukraine. “Russia’s cultural collaboration with the West is also being cut off. Cultural elites from Moscow and St. Petersburg in many cases have fled abroad. Moscow’s Garage Museum stopped work on its exhibitions due to the war in Ukraine. The artistic director of the V-A-C Foundation, which oversees Moscow’s new GES-2 arts center, resigned, as did the deputy director of the Pushkin Museum.”

The Calvert Journal: The battle to preserve Uzbekistan’s greatest art collection is moving online

The Calvert Journal: The battle to preserve Uzbekistan’s greatest art collection is moving online. “Claims of mismanagement have dogged the Nukus Museum for decades, as officials and art lovers fight between preserving Igor Savitsky’s avant-garde art collection in the desert, or bringing its masterpieces to a wider audience. Now, a new project is putting tens of Savitsy’s greatest works online — but the battle for the museum’s future is far from over.”

Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation: IPLC Launches the Video Appeals to the President of Russia Web Archive

Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation: IPLC Launches the Video Appeals to the President of Russia Web Archive. “The Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation is pleased to announce the launch of the Video Appeals to the President of Russia web archive, preserving online videos created as direct appeals to Vladimir Putin by various groups and individuals in the Russian Federation and a number of other countries. The videos contain requests for the president’s direct involvement in resolving local and national social, economic, legal and environmental problems, assessment of Putin’s leadership, advice to him, and birthday wishes.”

Find Los Russian & Ukrainian Family: Photo database of more than 20,000 Russian churches brings new life to genealogy

Find Lost Russian & Ukrainian Family: Photo database of more than 20,000 Russian churches brings new life to genealogy. “The tragic history of destroying churches in Russia cannot be forgotten. Thankfully, volunteers in Russia are photographing the churches still standing throughout the massive country. So far, the Temples of Russia project has more than 26,000 photos of Russian Orthodox and Old Believers churches and chapels in its database. The amazing database has churches that are functioning, closed and forgotten. Photos were even added today.”

Orthodox Christianity: Russian Church creating digital archive of ruined monuments of Church architecture

Orthodox Christianity: Russian Church creating digital archive of ruined monuments of Church architecture. “On Sunday, September 13, a moleben was held after the Divine Liturgy at the Church of the Holy Martyr Clement of Rome in Moscow on the occasion of the launch of significant new Church-wide project devoted to the many ruined churches and monasteries throughout Russia.”

The Moscow Times: Eleven Centuries of Russian Patterns, Now Online

The Moscow Times: Eleven Centuries of Russian Patterns, Now Online. “The archive… was launched by Maria Loleyt, a former project manager and marketing expert. It contains more than 7,000 authentic decorative patterns created by the national groups that have lived in Russia, the Soviet Union, and the Russian Empire. The ornamental patterns have been preserved in a wide variety of textiles and mediums and span eleven centuries of Russian history.”

Calvert Journal: This new online talent hub is showcasing Russia’s best young photographers

Calvert Journal: This new online talent hub is showcasing Russia’s best young photographers. “Currently featuring 47 emerging photographers, the Attention Hub will highlight pioneering artists for collectors, curators and institutions. The charity hopes that the database, available in English and Russian, will break down stereotypes and challenge cultural isolation.” Some of the pictures in the article do show nudity.

EIN Presswire: Ogonek Digital Archive, from 1923 (PRESS RELEASE)

EIN Presswire: Ogonek Digital Archive, from 1923 (PRESS RELEASE). “Ogonek, the popular newsweekly that has embodied Russian life and culture since early in the Soviet era, is now available as a digital archive from East View….With exacting bibliographic rigor, the Ogonek Digital Archive reproduces in full image (including searchable full text) all 225,000 pages of the 4,700 issues published since 1923, including 440,000 photographs. The Ogonek Digital Archive is cross-searchable with related e-content on East View’s robust Web platform.”