Ubergizmo: Lawmakers Proposes That Streaming Services Broadcast Emergency Alerts

Ubergizmo: Lawmakers Proposes That Streaming Services Broadcast Emergency Alerts. “One of the benefits of streaming services like Netflix and Amazon is that you don’t need to deal with ads. This is because while they do sometimes feel like regular television, they are not, and as such, aren’t necessarily subjected to the same requirements of television. This includes broadcasting emergency alerts in the form of Reliable Emergency Alert Distribution Improvement (READI).”

Tubefilter: Company Behind YouTube DIY Channel Blossom Pulls Down Videos Showing False, Dangerous Hacks

Tubefilter: Company Behind YouTube DIY Channel Blossom Pulls Down Videos Showing False, Dangerous Hacks. “First Media, the company behind popular life hack channel Blossom, has pulled down a number of videos after the Wall Street Journal challenged the veracity and safety of its hacks. Blossom, known for popularizing memeable life hacks like bathing peanut butter-smeared charcoal in ice to turn it into crystals, has a whopping 11.3M subscribers on YouTube, and 58M followers on Facebook. During its peak months (around this time last year), it brought in more than 200M views on YouTube, but it’s since sloped down to around 50M views per month.”

Rolling Stone: How a Government Agency’s Offbeat Twitter Memes Landed in the Library of Congress

Rolling Stone: How a Government Agency’s Offbeat Twitter Memes Landed in the Library of Congress. “In September 2016, Joseph Galbo put a baby in a forcefield. It was the second day of Baby Safety Month, and Galbo, the social media specialist for the Consumer Product Safety Commission, had gotten the OK from his director to try out a new way of communicating to the American public the best ways to protect a newborn. The photo he posted had the goofy aesthetic of a slapdash Photoshop job — a smiling baby with a glowing aura nestled in the center of a blue orb — while the CPSC’s logo at the bottom lent the image the added feel of a low-budget PSA.” Gloriously weird.

BusinessWire: New Public Safety Power Shutoff Zip Code Alerts Allow General Public to Receive Notifications – Including Those Without PG&E Accounts (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: New Public Safety Power Shutoff Zip Code Alerts Allow General Public to Receive Notifications – Including Those Without PG&E Accounts (PRESS RELEASE). “As part of its commitment to keep customers and communities, as well as others in its service area safe, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) has developed a new tool to allow anyone to receive notifications about Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) events, even if they are not PG&E customers or account holders. Although PG&E customers already will receive alerts specific to their address, this new tool is also especially useful for tenants, caretakers, travelers, and parents of school-age children.”

FBI: Safe Online Surfing Challenge Launches

FBI: Safe Online Surfing Challenge Launches. “The FBI’s Safe Online Surfing (SOS) Internet Challenge, which had record participation in 2018-2019, is reopening for the start of the new school year to help students navigate the web securely. As the FBI sees more and more crimes begin online, the growing participation numbers show that educators and caregivers also recognize the importance of teaching young people web literacy and safety.”

SGS: SGS Launches New Product Recalls Online Platform

This launched in late July but I missed it. From SGS (Standard Global Services): SGS Launches New Product Recalls Online Platform. “The platform, which launches on July 12, generates a searchable database of all unsafe product notifications compiled by official surveillance authorities operating in the European Union (RAPEX and RASFF) and United States (CPSC and FDA); with data from Australia and Canada to be incorporated into the site later this year.”

University of Washington: New tools to minimize risks in shared, augmented-reality environments

University of Washington: New tools to minimize risks in shared, augmented-reality environments. “For now, AR remains mostly a solo activity, but soon people might be using the technology for a variety of group activities, such as playing multi-user games or collaborating on work or creative projects. But how can developers guard against bad actors who try to hijack these experiences, and prevent privacy breaches in environments that span digital and physical space?”