Independent (Ireland): Rouble trouble as US-made ATMs can’t dispense new banknote

Independent (Ireland): Rouble trouble as US-made ATMs can’t dispense new banknote. “Russia’s new 100 rouble banknote is impossible to withdraw from ATMs because the Western companies that programmed the cash machines have quit the country. The Association of Russian Banks has asked for a six-month delay to the introduction of the banknote, which carries a drawing of a Second World War memorial to Soviet soldiers, because bank machines require re-programming to dispense them.”

ProPublica: Google Allowed a Sanctioned Russian Ad Company to Harvest User Data for Months

ProPublica: Google Allowed a Sanctioned Russian Ad Company to Harvest User Data for Months. “The day after Russia’s February invasion of Ukraine, Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Mark Warner sent a letter to Google warning it to be on alert for ‘exploitation of your platform by Russia and Russian-linked entities,’ and calling on the company to audit its advertising business’s compliance with economic sanctions. But as recently as June 23, Google was sharing potentially sensitive user data with a sanctioned Russian ad tech company owned by Russia’s largest state bank, according to a new report provided to ProPublica.”

Yale School of Management: Over 1,000 Companies Have Curtailed Operations in Russia—But Some Remain

Yale School of Management: Over 1,000 Companies Have Curtailed Operations in Russia—But Some Remain. “Over 1,000 companies have publicly announced they are voluntarily curtailing operations in Russia to some degree beyond the bare minimum legally required by international sanctions — but some companies have continued to operate in Russia undeterred. Originally a simple ‘withdraw’ vs. ‘remain’ list, our list of companies now consists of five categories—graded on a school-style letter grade scale of A-F for the completeness of withdrawal.”

Tech war: Chinese database software vendor shrugs off sanctions risk on using open-source code from Oracle’s MySQL system (South China Morning Post)

South China Morning Post: Tech war: Chinese database software vendor shrugs off sanctions risk on using open-source code from Oracle’s MySQL system. “A Chinese software vendor has brushed aside speculation that its enterprise product, which uses code from Oracle Corp’s MySQL open-source relational database management system, faces the risk of sanctions amid simmering tensions between Washington and Beijing.”

The Register: Even Russia’s Evil Corp now favors software-as-a-service

The Register: Even Russia’s Evil Corp now favors software-as-a-service. “The Russian-based Evil Corp is jumping from one malware strain to another in hopes of evading sanctions placed on it by the US government in 2019. You might be wondering why cyberextortionists in the Land of Putin give a bit flip about US sanctions: as we understand it, the sanctions mean anyone doing business with or handling transactions for gang will face the wrath of Uncle Sam. Evil Corp is therefore radioactive, few will want to interact with it, and the group has to shift its appearance and operations to keep its income flowing.”

New York Times: U.S. Technology, a Longtime Tool for Russia, Becomes a Vulnerability

New York Times: U.S. Technology, a Longtime Tool for Russia, Becomes a Vulnerability. “U.S. officials have long been proud of their country’s ability to supply technology and munitions to the rest of the world. But since Russia invaded Ukraine in late February, the United States has faced an unfortunate reality: The tools that Russian forces are using to wage war are often powered by American innovation. Still, while the technology made by American and European companies has been turned against Ukraine, the situation has also given the United States and its allies an important source of leverage against Russia.”

Russia’s e-commerce trade in the aftermath of the 2022 invasion: Evidence from high-frequency data (Vox EU)

Vox EU: Russia’s e-commerce trade in the aftermath of the 2022 invasion: Evidence from high-frequency data. “Whether economic sanctions against Russia have real effects has been increasingly called into question. This column suggests that changes in e-commerce can demonstrate whether and how the 2022 Western sanctions contributed to de-linking Russia from the West. An analysis of trends in cross-border international online retail based on digitally recorded daily transactions data from 2,288 international and Russian companies shows substantial declines in Russia’s e-commerce transactions. About five weeks after the war started, revenues from e-commerce imports to Russia had fallen by half, with no signs of compensation by Russian retailers in the sample studied.”

Cosmopolitan no more: Russians feel sting of cultural and economic rift (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Cosmopolitan no more: Russians feel sting of cultural and economic rift. “Three months into the war, Russia has become the most sanctioned country in the world, and almost 1,000 foreign brands – the majority of them voluntarily – have curtailed their operations there, according to records kept by the Yale School of Management. The exodus of companies continued this week with McDonald’s officially announcing it would leave Russia after three decades.”