University of Oregon: Satellite imagery could improve fossil-hunting at remote sites

University of Oregon: Satellite imagery could improve fossil-hunting at remote sites. “Satellite imagery could help paleontologists spot promising fossil sites before trekking into remote places. New research from the lab of UO paleontologist Edward Davis in the Department of Earth Sciences shows that satellite data can reveal large individual fossils from the air, allowing field researchers to embark on more targeted searches on the ground.”

PR Newswire: Near Space Labs Launches Imagery Grant Program to Unlock Free Access to its Ultra-High Resolution Imagery for Nonprofits, Researchers and Universities (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Near Space Labs Launches Imagery Grant Program to Unlock Free Access to its Ultra-High Resolution Imagery for Nonprofits, Researchers and Universities (PRESS RELEASE). “Near Space Labs, the cutting-edge geospatial data and Earth imagery company, today announced the launch of its Community Resilience & Innovation Earth Imagery Grant program that will make its 10 cm ultra-high resolution imagery available for free to nonprofits, researchers, and universities, among others.”

The Conversation: Rivers can suddenly change course – scientists used 50 years of satellite images to learn where and how it happens

The Conversation: Rivers can suddenly change course – scientists used 50 years of satellite images to learn where and how it happens. “Throughout history, important cities around the world have flourished along river banks. But rivers can also be destructive forces. They routinely flood, and on rare occasions, they can abruptly shift pathways. These ‘channel-jumping’ events, which are called avulsions, have caused some of the deadliest floods in human history…. In a newly published study, I worked with colleagues to map the global distribution of avulsions on river fans and deltas. We used satellite images of over 100 rivers from 1973 to the present, providing a half-century of bird’s-eye views of global river evolution.”

Global Plastic Watch: Satellite Eyes Pinpoint Waste From Space to Reduce Ocean Pollution (BusinessWire) (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Global Plastic Watch: Satellite Eyes Pinpoint Waste From Space to Reduce Ocean Pollution (PRESS RELEASE). “Global Plastic Watch (globalplasticwatch.org) is a tool which combines earth observation with artificial intelligence to create the first-ever near-real-time high-resolution map of plastic pollution. This is the largest open-source dataset of plastic waste across dozens of countries.”

C4ISRNet: Intelligence agencies accelerate use of commercial space imagery to support Ukraine

C4ISRNet: Intelligence agencies accelerate use of commercial space imagery to support Ukraine. “Since before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, space imagery, remote sensing and communications satellites have been informing the public and helping keep Ukrainian forces and civilians connected. Because of its partnerships with commercial industry, the U.S intelligence community was positioned to quickly leverage those capabilities to increase its own support in the region, accelerating several in-the-works acquisition efforts and increasing the capacity of planned procurements.”

The New Republic: Are These Satellite Images War Propaganda?

The New Republic: Are These Satellite Images War Propaganda?. “Maxar boasts that the News Bureau is a vehicle for ‘social good and global transparency,’ offering services ‘that are powerful complements to good journalism, providing indisputable truth at a time when credibility is critical.’ The company’s images have indeed proven an effective tool; during the buildup to the war in Ukraine, they’ve served as an important counterpoint to Russian disinformation. But Maxar is by no means a neutral player when it comes to global conflict, and thus there are limits to what these images alone can tell us. Sometimes they may provide not an ‘indisputable truth’ but a distorted understanding of the story.”

Bellingcat: Bellingcat Can Now Access Specialised Satellite Imagery. Tell Us Where We Should Look

Bellingcat: Bellingcat Can Now Access Specialised Satellite Imagery. Tell Us Where We Should Look. “Our team has purchased a subscription to Planet Labs, a private company whose satellites can capture 50cm resolution imagery of anywhere on Earth within a few days of a tasking request. Just a few years ago, satellite imagery of this quality was largely unavailable to the non-profit and independent researchers who play a key role in Bellingcat’s work. We intend to regularly collect suggestions for where this tasking should be directed, then publish the resulting image for all to access and analyse.”

Satellite Journalism: Best practices for working with satellite data — what I learned from the experts

SatelliteJournalism: Best practices for working with satellite data — what I learned from the experts. “Satellites orbiting the earth are collecting vast amounts of data about our planet — much of it openly available to the public. For reporters, this offers unique opportunities for original investigations and visual storytelling. But how do you get started? And what should you be looking out for? I spoke to four journalists who regularly work with satellite data about how to start, best practices and most importantly — mistakes to avoid.”

UC Santa Barbara: Taming Satellite Data

UC Santa Barbara: Taming Satellite Data. “More than 700 imaging satellites orbit the Earth, and every day they beam vast amounts of information to databases on the ground. There’s just one problem: While the geospatial data could help researchers and policymakers address critical challenges, only those with considerable wealth and expertise can access it. Now, a team of scientists, including UC Santa Barbara’s Tamma Carleton… has devised a machine learning system to tap the problem-solving potential of satellite imaging.”

Suez Canal: Satellite Clues on a Stricken Cargo Ship (Bellingcat)

Bellingcat: Suez Canal: Satellite Clues on a Stricken Cargo Ship. “It’s hard to miss. The Ever Given, at 400 metres long, is one of the largest container ships in the world. It is therefore reasonable to assume that it will be easily identifiable with a simple search of satellite imagery. As such, the vessel provides an opportunity to demonstrate how open-source information and satellite imagery can help paint a detailed picture of a developing news story.”

BBC: Norway funds satellite map of world’s tropical forests

BBC: Norway funds satellite map of world’s tropical forests. “A unique satellite dataset on the world’s tropical forests is now available for all to see and use. It’s a high-resolution image map covering 64 countries that will be updated monthly. Anyone who wants to understand how trees are being managed will be able to download the necessary information for analysis – for free.”

ICEYE: ICEYE Shares Nearly 18,000 Satellite Image Catalog Under Creative Commons License

ICEYE: ICEYE Shares Nearly 18,000 Satellite Image Catalog Under Creative Commons License. “Finnish New Space leader ICEYE today announced access to ICEYE’s Public Archive, containing nearly 18,000 images from ICEYE satellites. The ICEYE Public Archive includes radar imagery in various imaging modes taken with ICEYE’s SAR satellite constellation between mid-2019 and now. The ICEYE Public Archive consists of preview images from around the world, which are released under CC BY-NC 4.0 license, allowing for non-commercial use.”