BBC: Norway funds satellite map of world’s tropical forests

BBC: Norway funds satellite map of world’s tropical forests. “A unique satellite dataset on the world’s tropical forests is now available for all to see and use. It’s a high-resolution image map covering 64 countries that will be updated monthly. Anyone who wants to understand how trees are being managed will be able to download the necessary information for analysis – for free.”

ICEYE: ICEYE Shares Nearly 18,000 Satellite Image Catalog Under Creative Commons License

ICEYE: ICEYE Shares Nearly 18,000 Satellite Image Catalog Under Creative Commons License. “Finnish New Space leader ICEYE today announced access to ICEYE’s Public Archive, containing nearly 18,000 images from ICEYE satellites. The ICEYE Public Archive includes radar imagery in various imaging modes taken with ICEYE’s SAR satellite constellation between mid-2019 and now. The ICEYE Public Archive consists of preview images from around the world, which are released under CC BY-NC 4.0 license, allowing for non-commercial use.”

Volunteers wanted: NASA’s Planet Patrol wants your help to find alien worlds (Space)

Space: Volunteers wanted: NASA’s Planet Patrol wants your help to find alien worlds. “You can help NASA’s newest planet-hunting mission do its otherworldly work. The space agency just launched a citizen-science project called Planet Patrol, which asks volunteers around the world to sort through images collected by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).”

Silicon Republic: NASA, ESA and JAXA’s new tool shows our climate changed by Covid-19

Silicon Republic: NASA, ESA and JAXA’s new tool shows our climate changed by Covid-19. “NASA, ESA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) have unveiled a new tool designed to give researchers and policymakers access to planet-wide changes in the environment and human society following the largest pandemic in a generation. The Covid-19 Earth Observation Dashboard integrates multiple satellite data records with analytical tools to allow user-friendly tracking of changes in air and water quality, climate change, economic activity, and agriculture.”

Satellite data suggests coronavirus may have hit China earlier: Researchers (ABC News)

ABC News: Satellite data suggests coronavirus may have hit China earlier: Researchers. “Dramatic spikes in auto traffic around major hospitals in Wuhan last fall suggest the novel coronavirus may have been present and spreading through central China long before the outbreak was first reported to the world, according to a new Harvard Medical School study.”

Ubergizmo: Exact Air Pollution From All Power Plants Globally Will Soon Be Revealed

Ubergizmo: Exact Air Pollution From All Power Plants Globally Will Soon Be Revealed. “Power plants, particularly those that run on fossil fuels, tend to pollute the environment. No wonder countries are increasingly shifting to more renewable and green sources of energy to reduce their impact on the environment. WattTime, a nonprofit artificial intelligence firm, will soon provide valuable data which will track air pollution from every power plant in the world.”

The Atlantic: Stock Picks From Space

The Atlantic: Stock Picks From Space. “There is an old story about Sam Walton: In the early days of Walmart, its founder would monitor how stores were doing by counting the cars in the parking lot. After seeing the power of satellite imagery in his factory deal, Tom [Diamond] had a similar idea, but on a scale Walton could not have imagined. He asked his brother, ‘What if we could count the cars at every Walmart?'”

Debate Report: New Web-Based App Showcases Earth’s Light Emissions

Debate Report: New Web-Based App Showcases Earth’s Light Emissions. “A large amount of the datasets provided by scientific satellites is available for free, but they aren’t accessible for the general public. A new web application will facilitate access to satellite imagery of Earth. Radiance Light Trends allows users to inspect a specific region or site and observe how Earth’s light emissions changed in the last decades, with the earliest data being collected in 1992.”

Pierre Markuse: Satellite Image Guide for Journalists and Media

This is from December but it’s too good to miss. From Pierre Markuse: Satellite Image Guide for Journalists and Media. “So you would like to use a satellite image in your article and you would like to explain it to your viewers? Here is a short guide covering some of the most frequently asked questions and giving some general explanations on satellite images. It by no means covers all aspects, as there are far too many types of satellite images, but should give you a good start to find out more on your own and maybe motivate you to create your own images, which has become quite easy and quick even with no prior knowledge of it.”

Ars Technica: Satellites watch over the graves of ancient steppe nomads

Ars Technica: Satellites watch over the graves of ancient steppe nomads. “University of Sydney archaeologist Gino Caspari and his colleagues searched for Scythian burial mounds, or kurgans, in high-resolution satellite images of a 110 square kilometer (68.4 square mile) area of the Xinjiang province in northwestern China. They mapped their findings and noted how many of the burial mounds looked like they’d been disturbed by looters. When looters dig up the contents of the grave pit, the center of the mound usually collapses. Observers who know what they’re looking for can spot that from above; imagine looking at a sheet of bubble wrap to see which ones have been popped. Although the satellite images weren’t as precise as a detailed ground survey, they offered a pretty accurate estimate of the general situation on the ground—and the news wasn’t good.”

Artnet: Satellites Are Taking Data-Based Images of the Earth and the Colors Are Spectacular—See Them Here

Artnet: Satellites Are Taking Data-Based Images of the Earth and the Colors Are Spectacular—See Them Here. “Experience Earth art as you’ve never seen it before in a stunning new set of satellite images that depicts the globe’s landscape in otherworldly hues. Last month, the United States Geological Survey released the fifth installment of the ‘Earth as Art’ series drawn from imagery taken by the Landsat satellite program.”

Bellingcat: How to Identify Burnt Villages by Satellite Imagery  — Case-Studies from California, Nigeria and Myanmar

Bellingcat: How to Identify Burnt Villages by Satellite Imagery  — Case-Studies from California, Nigeria and Myanmar. “As satellite imagery becomes more available and technology permits for more access, we are seeing overhead mapping play more of an integral role in media and human rights bodies to identify a chronological story of an area. For some areas, this may be through infrastructure expansions, military operations, or what new equipment has just landed on the tarmac. For other parts, satellite imagery can reveal signs of chemical attacks or villages that have been burnt to the ground.”

US News & World Report: Satellite Imagery Company Launches Wildfire Twitter Feed

US News & World Report: Satellite Imagery Company Launches Wildfire Twitter Feed . “A new tool for visualizing and tracking wildfires from the sky was launched on twitter Wednesday by a New Mexico-based startup company, in an effort that combines super-computing capabilities with satellite imagery. Santa Fe-based Descartes Labs began distributing time-lapse video segments taken from satellite imagery of individual wildfires across the country. Hashtags that correspond to the name or location of fires are attached, allowing people to quickly find relevant imagery.”

PRNewswire: NASA Debuts Online Toolkit to Promote Commercial Use of Satellite Data (PRESS RELEASE)

PRNewswire: NASA Debuts Online Toolkit to Promote Commercial Use of Satellite Data (PRESS RELEASE). “While NASA’s policy of free and open remote-sensing data has long benefited the scientific community, other government agencies and nonprofit organizations, it has significant untapped potential for commercialization. NASA’s Technology Transfer program has created an online resource to promote commercial use of this data and the software tools needed to work with it. With the Remote Sensing Toolkit, users will now be able to find, analyze and utilize the most relevant data for their research, business projects or conservation efforts. The toolkit provides a simple system that quickly identifies relevant sources based on user input. The toolkit will help users search for data, as well as ready-to-use tools and code to build new tools.”

NASA: 20 Years of Earth Data Now at Your Fingertips

NASA: 20 Years of Earth Data Now at Your Fingertips. “Powerful Earth-observing instruments aboard NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively, have observed nearly two decades of planetary change. Now, for the first time, all that imagery — from the first operational image to imagery acquired today — is available for exploration in Worldview. Thanks to the efforts of several NASA teams, the public can now interactively browse all global imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument quickly and easily from the comfort of a home computer. All global MODIS imagery dating back to the operational start of MODIS in 2000 is available through NASA’s Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) for viewing using NASA’s Worldview application. And there’s a lot to see.”