Satellite Journalism: Best practices for working with satellite data — what I learned from the experts

SatelliteJournalism: Best practices for working with satellite data — what I learned from the experts. “Satellites orbiting the earth are collecting vast amounts of data about our planet — much of it openly available to the public. For reporters, this offers unique opportunities for original investigations and visual storytelling. But how do you get started? And what should you be looking out for? I spoke to four journalists who regularly work with satellite data about how to start, best practices and most importantly — mistakes to avoid.”

UC Santa Barbara: Taming Satellite Data

UC Santa Barbara: Taming Satellite Data. “More than 700 imaging satellites orbit the Earth, and every day they beam vast amounts of information to databases on the ground. There’s just one problem: While the geospatial data could help researchers and policymakers address critical challenges, only those with considerable wealth and expertise can access it. Now, a team of scientists, including UC Santa Barbara’s Tamma Carleton… has devised a machine learning system to tap the problem-solving potential of satellite imaging.”

NASA: NASA Invites You to Create Landsat-Inspired Arts and Crafts

NASA: NASA Invites You to Create Landsat-Inspired Arts and Crafts. “For almost 50 years, Landsat satellites have collected images of Earth from space, representing the longest continuous space-based record of our planet’s surface…. In September, Landsat 9 is scheduled to launch and continue this legacy. In honor of the launch, we invite you to get creative and show us what Landsat means to you! Create art or make a craft that’s inspired by a favorite Landsat image or the satellite itself, and share it with us on social media.”

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Major Ocean-Observing Satellite Starts Providing Science Data

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Major Ocean-Observing Satellite Starts Providing Science Data. “After six months of check-out and calibration in orbit, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will make its first two data streams available to the public on June 22. It launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Nov. 21, 2020, and is a U.S.-European collaboration to measure sea surface height and other key ocean features, such as ocean surface wind speed and wave height.”

Mashable: Want to skywatch for Starlink satellites? There’s a website that will help you.

Mashable: Want to skywatch for Starlink satellites? There’s a website that will help you.. “There isn’t a constellation quite like the image a line of Starlink satellites cuts across Earth’s skies. And now there’s an easy way to figure out when you can see them. The SpaceX-operated gear is meant to one day provide high speed, satellite-powered internet all around the world. It’s already semi-functional and open for live testing (at quite a cost), but the eventual orbital network, which is already approved by the FCC, will consist of 12,000 satellites in all.”

Satellite Database Update: More than 3,300 Active Satellites Orbiting the Earth (Union of Concerned Scientists)

Union of Concerned Scientists: Satellite Database Update: More than 3,300 Active Satellites Orbiting the Earth. “An updated version of the UCS Satellite Database, which includes launches through December 31, 2020, is now available on the UCS website. This update includes the addition to the database of 651 satellites and the removal of 66, for a total of 3,372 active satellites.”

Business Insider: SpaceX says its Starlink satellite internet can download 100 megabits per second, and ‘space lasers’ transfer data between satellites

Business Insider: SpaceX says its Starlink satellite internet can download 100 megabits per second, and ‘space lasers’ transfer data between satellites. “SpaceX says early tests of its rapidly growing fleet of internet-providing satellites are yielding promising results. Internal tests of a beta version of internet service from the company’s Starlink project show ‘super low latency and download speeds greater than 100’ megabits per second, Kate Tice, a SpaceX senior certification engineer, said during a live broadcast of a Starlink launch on Thursday.”

Technical .ly: Check out satellite telecomms company Iridium’s new online museum

Technical .ly: Check out satellite telecomms company Iridium’s new online museum. “Local institutions such as the National Zoo and the International Spy Museum are juuuuuuust beginning to open back up amid the coronavirus pandemic. But if you’re not comfy being around other people in public yet, Iridium Communications has something neat for you: The McLean, Virginia-based satellite constellation operator has launched an online museum to commemorate its work over the past 20 years.”

Slashgear: NASA wants the public to help track light pollution from VLEO satellites

Slashgear: NASA wants the public to help track light pollution from VLEO satellites. “NASA wants the public to help it track very-low Earth orbit (VLEO) satellites and the potential light pollution issues they may cause. The space agency launched a public science project that anyone can participate in, stating that it only requires a tripod, smartphone, and the use of a website that reveals when satellites will be overhead.”

UCS Satellite Database Update: More than 2,200 Active Satellites (Union of Concerned Scientists)

New-to-me, and now updated, from the Union of Concerned Scientists: UCS Satellite Database Update: More than 2,200 Active Satellites. “We have updated the UCS Satellite Database, including launches through September 30, 2019. Lots of movement this time, with 209 satellites added and 53 removed for a total of 2,218 actively working satellites. Much of the growth is being driven by the deployment of large commercial satellite systems.”

Android Police: A Googler built a tool to spot satellites from your backyard – no telescope required

Android Police: A Googler built a tool to spot satellites from your backyard – no telescope required. “A plethora of satellites are orbiting our planet, and if you know just when to look up, you might even be able to see some flying over your head. Google graphics and computer vision engineer James Darpinian has developed a web app that helps you identify where to look to spot these objects by utilizing Street View and browser notifications as well as weather warnings.”

Wired: Trump Tweeted a Sensitive Photo. Internet Sleuths Decoded It

Wired: Trump Tweeted a Sensitive Photo. Internet Sleuths Decoded It. “For many outside experts, the only thing more intriguing than the president sharing sensitive military intelligence was the mystery of the technology that created the image…. Within hours of Trump’s tweet, a handful of amateur satellite trackers had not only determined that the photo was taken by a spy satellite, they had figured out which satellite had taken the photo.”