Harvard International Review: The Space Race Expands: Why African Nations Are Shooting for the Stars

Harvard International Review: The Space Race Expands: Why African Nations Are Shooting for the Stars. “Egypt’s Nilesat 101 launched in 1998, providing multimedia services to over five million homes in the region. Since then, over 40 satellites have taken to the stars, with more than 20 in the last five years. In addition, the first satellites to be entirely developed in Africa were launched by South Africa’s Cape Peninsula University of Technology from Cape Canaveral in January 2022. The African space industry’s immense growth in recent years is a product of innovation in its applications, a need for stronger control of natural resources, and a desire to join the ranks of the preeminent space powers of the 21st century.”

Ars Technica: Mystery solved in destructive attack that knocked out >10k Viasat modems

Ars Technica: Mystery solved in destructive attack that knocked out >10k Viasat modems. “Viasat—the high-speed-satellite-broadband provider whose modems were knocked out in Ukraine and other parts of Europe earlier this month—has confirmed a theory by third-party researchers that new wiper malware with possible ties to the Russian government was responsible for the attack.”

Reuters: Exclusive-Hackers Who Crippled Viasat Modems in Ukraine Are Still Active Company Official

Reuters: Exclusive-Hackers Who Crippled Viasat Modems in Ukraine Are Still Active Company Official. “Hackers who crippled tens of thousands of satellite modems in Ukraine and across Europe are still trying to hobble U.S. telecommunications company Viasat as it works to bring its users back online, a company official told Reuters. Viasat Inc has been working to recover after a cyberattack remotely disabled satellite modems just as Russian forces pushed into Ukraine in the early hours of Feb. 24.”

Washington Post: Russian military behind hack of satellite communication devices in Ukraine at war’s outset, U.S. officials say

Washington Post: Russian military behind hack of satellite communication devices in Ukraine at war’s outset, U.S. officials say. “U.S. intelligence analysts have concluded that Russian military spy hackers were behind a cyberattack on a satellite broadband service that disrupted Ukraine’s military communications at the start of the war last month, according to U.S. officials familiar with the matter.”

Techdirt: Avoidable Viasat Satellite Hack Causes Headaches Across Europe And Ukraine

Techdirt: Avoidable Viasat Satellite Hack Causes Headaches Across Europe And Ukraine. “For literally more than a decade researchers have been warning that global satellite telecommunications networks were vulnerable to all manner of attacks…. Fast forward to 2022 and a major hack of Viasat’s satellite systems has caused, you guessed it, massive problems for an estimated 27,000 users. The attack on Viasat’s KA-SAT satellite system, suspected to be the work of the Russian government, appears to have been intended to disrupt Ukraine communications in the lead up to war, but managed to impact a very large chunk of Europe.”

Answer: What are some good (almost) real-time satellite image sources? (Search ReSearch)

Search ReSearch: Answer: What are some good (almost) real-time satellite image sources?. “The Challenge for last week was to find good aerial or satellite images that are more-or-less in realtime. As you can appreciate, the big problem is getting your hands on current images–or at least accurately time-stamped images from the not-too-distant past. Getting near-real-time imagery would be great, but often that’s outside the budget of many non-professional searchers.” Nice deep dive with some search philosophy mixed in.

Defense One: This New AI Tool Can Help Spot an Imminent Invasion

Defense One: This New AI Tool Can Help Spot an Imminent Invasion. “Just how many jets, cargo planes, and other military vehicles is Russia deploying to the border of Ukraine? Answering that sort of question is a labor-intensive project for analysts, requiring them to pore through satellite photos to find and classify specific objects. A new tool from data analysis firm Orbital Insight could change that.”

Satellite Journalism: Best practices for working with satellite data — what I learned from the experts

SatelliteJournalism: Best practices for working with satellite data — what I learned from the experts. “Satellites orbiting the earth are collecting vast amounts of data about our planet — much of it openly available to the public. For reporters, this offers unique opportunities for original investigations and visual storytelling. But how do you get started? And what should you be looking out for? I spoke to four journalists who regularly work with satellite data about how to start, best practices and most importantly — mistakes to avoid.”

UC Santa Barbara: Taming Satellite Data

UC Santa Barbara: Taming Satellite Data. “More than 700 imaging satellites orbit the Earth, and every day they beam vast amounts of information to databases on the ground. There’s just one problem: While the geospatial data could help researchers and policymakers address critical challenges, only those with considerable wealth and expertise can access it. Now, a team of scientists, including UC Santa Barbara’s Tamma Carleton… has devised a machine learning system to tap the problem-solving potential of satellite imaging.”

NASA: NASA Invites You to Create Landsat-Inspired Arts and Crafts

NASA: NASA Invites You to Create Landsat-Inspired Arts and Crafts. “For almost 50 years, Landsat satellites have collected images of Earth from space, representing the longest continuous space-based record of our planet’s surface…. In September, Landsat 9 is scheduled to launch and continue this legacy. In honor of the launch, we invite you to get creative and show us what Landsat means to you! Create art or make a craft that’s inspired by a favorite Landsat image or the satellite itself, and share it with us on social media.”

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Major Ocean-Observing Satellite Starts Providing Science Data

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Major Ocean-Observing Satellite Starts Providing Science Data. “After six months of check-out and calibration in orbit, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will make its first two data streams available to the public on June 22. It launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Nov. 21, 2020, and is a U.S.-European collaboration to measure sea surface height and other key ocean features, such as ocean surface wind speed and wave height.”

Mashable: Want to skywatch for Starlink satellites? There’s a website that will help you.

Mashable: Want to skywatch for Starlink satellites? There’s a website that will help you.. “There isn’t a constellation quite like the image a line of Starlink satellites cuts across Earth’s skies. And now there’s an easy way to figure out when you can see them. The SpaceX-operated gear is meant to one day provide high speed, satellite-powered internet all around the world. It’s already semi-functional and open for live testing (at quite a cost), but the eventual orbital network, which is already approved by the FCC, will consist of 12,000 satellites in all.”

Satellite Database Update: More than 3,300 Active Satellites Orbiting the Earth (Union of Concerned Scientists)

Union of Concerned Scientists: Satellite Database Update: More than 3,300 Active Satellites Orbiting the Earth. “An updated version of the UCS Satellite Database, which includes launches through December 31, 2020, is now available on the UCS website. This update includes the addition to the database of 651 satellites and the removal of 66, for a total of 3,372 active satellites.”