Mashable: TikTok users parody East Asian fetishization with ‘Americacore’ videos

Mashable: TikTok users parody East Asian fetishization with ‘Americacore’ videos. “Under the guise of celebrating ‘Americacore,’ TikTok users are recording their trips to Target and Walmart, eating snacks like Goldfish crackers and Funfetti cookies, and using paper plates. Paired with gentle music and soft filters, the video trend mimics the way many Americans fetishize East Asian culture, but misrepresent them in ‘aesthetic’ content.”

New York Times: For Political Cartoonists, the Irony Was That Facebook Didn’t Recognize Irony

New York Times: For Political Cartoonists, the Irony Was That Facebook Didn’t Recognize Irony. “In recent years, the company has become more proactive at restricting certain kinds of political speech, clamping down on posts about fringe extremist groups and on calls for violence. In January, Facebook barred Mr. Trump from posting on its site altogether after he incited a crowd that stormed the U.S. Capitol. At the same time, misinformation researchers said, Facebook has had trouble identifying the slipperiest and subtlest of political content: satire. While satire and irony are common in everyday speech, the company’s artificial intelligence systems — and even its human moderators — can have difficulty distinguishing them.”

Kansas City Star: Kansas City actor finds national spotlight with Disney musical parody promoting masks

Kansas City Star: Kansas City actor finds national spotlight with Disney musical parody promoting masks. “There is one line in Noah Lindquist’s viral Disney parody that made him pause before he recorded the video. Should he include it? People will figure out the word behind that bleep. But some things must be said, especially during a pandemic that has killed more than 220,000 Americans, especially when some people continue to turn up their noses at science and refuse to wear a mask.”

AFP Fact Check: This satirical video was made in 2020 using old black and white movie clips

AFP Fact Check: This satirical video was made in 2020 using old black and white movie clips. “A video supposedly made in 1956 that warns of a deadly virus that will spread from ‘somewhere in Asia to the rest of the world’ by ‘the year 2020’ has been shared on Facebook thousands of times alongside a claim it accurately predicted the Covid-19 pandemic. The claim is false; the video creator told AFP it was made in 2020 for satire, in response to Covid-19 misinformation. ”

New York Times: How The Babylon Bee, a Right-Wing Satire Site, Capitalizes on Confusion

New York Times: How The Babylon Bee, a Right-Wing Satire Site, Capitalizes on Confusion. “Emma Goldberg, a reporter for The New York Times, recently profiled The Babylon Bee, and wrote about how the site’s satire is frequently mistaken for reality. I chatted with Ms. Goldberg about her article, The Babylon Bee’s habit of skirting the line between misinformation and satire, and how it capitalizes on its audience’s confusion.”

BuzzFeed News: A Viral Twitter Account About Jurassic Park Is The Perfect Satire For Companies Amid The Coronavirus Pandemic

BuzzFeed News: A Viral Twitter Account About Jurassic Park Is The Perfect Satire For Companies Amid The Coronavirus Pandemic. “As theme parks and other attractions reopen in parts of the US despite surges in coronavirus infections and deaths, and while corporations and brands struggle to finesse their public voice during the pandemic and racial justice protests, a satirical account making fun of a movie series that began in 1993 is suddenly shockingly relevant. Created earlier this month, Jurassic Park Updates’ absurdist humor and skewering of capitalism is some of the most relevant and biting satire currently being made.”

Phys .org: How social media makes it difficult to identify real news

Phys .org: How social media makes it difficult to identify real news. “There’s a price to pay when you get your news and political information from the same place you find funny memes and cat pictures, new research suggests. The study found that people viewing a blend of news and entertainment on a social media site tended to pay less attention to the source of content they consumed—meaning they could easily mistake satire or fiction for real news.”

Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief

Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief. “Researchers at The Ohio State University found that flagging inaccurate political posts because they had been disputed by fact-checkers or fellow Facebook users was not as good at reducing belief in the falsehoods or stopping people from sharing them.However, labeling inaccurate posts as being humor, parody or a hoax did reduce Facebook users’ belief in the falsehoods and resulted in significantly less willingness to share the posts.”

The Conversation: Too many people think satirical news is real

The Conversation: Too many people think satirical news is real. “Our team of communication researchers has spent years studying misinformation, satire and social media. Over the last several months, we’ve surveyed Americans’ beliefs about dozens of high-profile political issues. We identified news stories – both true and false – that were being shared widely on social media. We discovered that many of the false stories weren’t the kind that were trying to intentionally deceive their readers; they actually came from satirical sites, and many people seemed to believe them.”

Mashable: UnNews is a handy database that aims to keep tabs on fake news and biased sources

Mashable: UnNews is a handy database that aims to keep tabs on fake news and biased sources . “There’s a new tool to help you refute all the fake news your aunt posts on Facebook. It’s called ‘UnNews’ and it’s the product of the International Fact-Checking Network, a wing of the Poynter Institute, a nonprofit journalism school. As the 2020 election cycle heats up, it aims to battle fake news by educating people about websites that traffic in fake news, biased news, and even satire.”

The Silhouette: McMaster alumna promotes STEM satire through new website

The Silhouette: McMaster alumna promotes STEM satire through new website. “After completing an undergraduate degree in chemistry and masters in chemical engineering at McMaster University, Lexa Graham embarked on a new path. She performed in stand-up comedy shows and wrote for satire sites like The Onion and CBC Comedy. After identifying a gap in the market for satirical science content, she launched [DNAtured] on Feb. 21.” Like The Onion, but for STEM topics. I liked it.

Lifehacker: How to Spot a Fake Trend

Lifehacker: How to Spot a Fake Trend. “Ankle scarves! What a ridiculous trend! Twitter users are asking each other how something as dumb as ‘ankle scarves’ could be real. Well—and I’m afraid to reveal this, because so many real media outlets are falling for it—it’s not real. It’s an obvious joke. Here’s how it got laundered into a ‘crazy trend’ for everyone to laugh and be outraged at on social media.”

BBC: India man jailed for tweets about erotic temple statues released

BBC: India man jailed for tweets about erotic temple statues released. “An Indian man has been released from prison after more than a month, for posting satirical tweets about erotic sculptures in a temple. In September, Abhijit Iyer-Mitra, posted a video in which he makes disparaging comments about the famous Konark temple in the eastern state of Orissa and the people of the state.”