Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief

Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief. “Researchers at The Ohio State University found that flagging inaccurate political posts because they had been disputed by fact-checkers or fellow Facebook users was not as good at reducing belief in the falsehoods or stopping people from sharing them.However, labeling inaccurate posts as being humor, parody or a hoax did reduce Facebook users’ belief in the falsehoods and resulted in significantly less willingness to share the posts.”

The Conversation: Too many people think satirical news is real

The Conversation: Too many people think satirical news is real. “Our team of communication researchers has spent years studying misinformation, satire and social media. Over the last several months, we’ve surveyed Americans’ beliefs about dozens of high-profile political issues. We identified news stories – both true and false – that were being shared widely on social media. We discovered that many of the false stories weren’t the kind that were trying to intentionally deceive their readers; they actually came from satirical sites, and many people seemed to believe them.”

Mashable: UnNews is a handy database that aims to keep tabs on fake news and biased sources

Mashable: UnNews is a handy database that aims to keep tabs on fake news and biased sources . “There’s a new tool to help you refute all the fake news your aunt posts on Facebook. It’s called ‘UnNews’ and it’s the product of the International Fact-Checking Network, a wing of the Poynter Institute, a nonprofit journalism school. As the 2020 election cycle heats up, it aims to battle fake news by educating people about websites that traffic in fake news, biased news, and even satire.”

The Silhouette: McMaster alumna promotes STEM satire through new website

The Silhouette: McMaster alumna promotes STEM satire through new website. “After completing an undergraduate degree in chemistry and masters in chemical engineering at McMaster University, Lexa Graham embarked on a new path. She performed in stand-up comedy shows and wrote for satire sites like The Onion and CBC Comedy. After identifying a gap in the market for satirical science content, she launched [DNAtured] on Feb. 21.” Like The Onion, but for STEM topics. I liked it.

Lifehacker: How to Spot a Fake Trend

Lifehacker: How to Spot a Fake Trend. “Ankle scarves! What a ridiculous trend! Twitter users are asking each other how something as dumb as ‘ankle scarves’ could be real. Well—and I’m afraid to reveal this, because so many real media outlets are falling for it—it’s not real. It’s an obvious joke. Here’s how it got laundered into a ‘crazy trend’ for everyone to laugh and be outraged at on social media.”

BBC: India man jailed for tweets about erotic temple statues released

BBC: India man jailed for tweets about erotic temple statues released. “An Indian man has been released from prison after more than a month, for posting satirical tweets about erotic sculptures in a temple. In September, Abhijit Iyer-Mitra, posted a video in which he makes disparaging comments about the famous Konark temple in the eastern state of Orissa and the people of the state.”

CNET: Saudi Arabia will punish satire online mocking ‘public order, religious values’

CNET: Saudi Arabia will punish satire online mocking ‘public order, religious values’. “In Saudi Arabia, posting satire online that ‘mocks, provokes or disrupts public order, religious values and public morals’ could cost you $800,000 and up to five years in jail, the Public Prosecution, a government agency, tweeted Monday.”