US News & World Report: U.N. Calls on Social Media Giants to Control Platforms Used to Lure African Migrants

US News & World Report: U.N. Calls on Social Media Giants to Control Platforms Used to Lure African Migrants . “The U.N. migration agency called on social media giants on Friday to make it harder for people smugglers to use their platforms to lure West African migrants to Libya where they can face detention, torture, slavery or death. The smugglers often use Facebook to reach would-be migrants with false promises of jobs in Europe, International Organization for Migration (IOM) spokesman Leonard Doyle said.”

ProPublica: Facebook Allowed Political Ads That Were Actually Scams and Malware

ProPublica: Facebook Allowed Political Ads That Were Actually Scams and Malware. “Russian disinformation isn’t the only deceptive political advertising on Facebook. The pitch designed to lure President Donald Trump’s critics is one of more than a dozen politically themed advertisements masking consumer rip-offs that ProPublica has identified since launching an effort in September to monitor paid political messages on the world’s largest social network. As the American public becomes ever more polarized along partisan lines, swindlers who used to capitalize on curiosity about celebrities or sports are now exploiting political passions.” And it’s been going on for a while – I mentioned this a year ago in a fake ad mentioning Michelle Obama.

Mailsploit: It’s 2017, and you can spoof the ‘from’ in email to fool filters (The Register)

The Register: Mailsploit: It’s 2017, and you can spoof the ‘from’ in email to fool filters. “Penetration tester Sabri Haddouche has reintroduced the world to email source spoofing, bypassing spam filters and protections like Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting and Conformance (DMARC), thereby posing a risk to anyone running a vulnerable and unpatched mail client.”

Naked Security: 3 simple tips to stay off the hook this phishing season

Naked Security: 3 simple tips to stay off the hook this phishing season. “We know that the majority of Naked Security readers are strongly interested in IT and computer security, as well as partly or fully responsible for security at work or at home (or, more likely, both). So, even if you could spot a phish at 100 paces, what about your friends, family and colleagues? We thought it might help if we put together a brief “story in pictures” to help you do the explaining. Here goes.” A good article to pass around to your less technically-savvy friends and family.

CNET: Windows Movie Maker scam tops Google search results

CNET: Windows Movie Maker scam tops Google search results. “If you’re looking to download the amateur video editor that Microsoft had provided for years, you won’t find it from the company. But one of the top search results on Google for ‘Windows Movie Maker’ leads to a scam version of the video editor that aims to steal your money.”

INC: Why Do Facebook Hoaxes Often Ask You To Copy, Paste, And Modify, Rather Than To Share?

INC: Why Do Facebook Hoaxes Often Ask You To Copy, Paste, And Modify, Rather Than To Share?. “Over the past few weeks several people have asked me why some Facebook scams and hoaxes – fake news, spurious offers, etc. – specifically tell people not to re-share them, but rather, to copy and paste their contents into new posts, sometimes with a request to add personal comments to the new posts: I believe that there are at least four reasons for this…” Interesting.

ZDNet: Researchers Find 450,000 Financial Scams Operating on Social Media

ZDNet: Researchers find 450,000 financial scams operating on social media. “Financial scams have doubled in the past year on social media but only a small pool of cyberattackers appear to be behind the surge. According to ZeroFOX researchers, around 250,000 finance and banking scams were lurking on social media platforms including Twitter and Facebook in 2016, but now, this estimate has almost doubled having reached a total of 437,165 fraudulent campaigns.”