Corridor Crew Scans an Entire Ghost Town With a Phone and YOU MUST NOT MISS IT

One of the YouTube channels I subscribe to is called Corridor Crew. The channel’s description is “We run a production studio based upon ingenuity, hard work, and friendship. Watch our ups and downs as professional creators!” Its most recent video was about using LiDAR to scan an entire ghost town. WITH A PHONE. Cerro Gordo is now available to view (and in some cases walk through!) at https://poly.cam/cerro-gordo . I watched most of the backstory video with my jaw on the floor. The progress made by LiDAR scanning apps is unbelievable. If you didn’t realize how far phone-based 3D scanning has come, do yourself a favor and watch the video or visit the ghost town online.

New York Times: He stalks delirious, unfinished New York as it rises

New York Times: He stalks delirious, unfinished New York as it rises. “British artist Nick Relph likes to wander New York under cover of night, loitering in the vicinity of the city’s ubiquitous construction fences, doing a thing that seems at first glance — especially if you are a police offer — immediately identifiable. He holds a dark object in his hand. He swipes it rhythmically up and down the wooden fencing and its building poster, a motion common to generations of graffitists and guerrilla wheat-paste-poster artists. Except that in place of a spray can or glue roller, his instrument is a lightweight VuPoint Magic Wand digital scanner, a cheap device about the size of an electric toothbrush, often used to digitize book pages and legal documents. And so instead of leaving art on the streets, Relph is slowly extracting it.”

KMSP: St. Thomas students develop scanner to create digital archive of tactile images for the blind

KMSP: St. Thomas students develop scanner to create digital archive of tactile images for the blind. “Engineering students from the University of St. Thomas unveiled a scanner they developed to better preserve tactile images created for the blind. When the Minnesota State Services for the Blind transcribes school textbooks into braille, images in textbooks are turned into tactile diagrams, so that a vision impaired reader can feel the image.”