Internet Archive Blog: How the Internet Archive is Ensuring Permanent Access to Open Access Journal Articles

Internet Archive Blog: How the Internet Archive is Ensuring Permanent Access to Open Access Journal Articles. “Open Access journals, such as New Theology Review (ISSN: 0896-4297) and Open Journal of Hematology (ISSN: 2075-907X), made their research articles available for free online for years. With a quick click or a simple query, students anywhere in the world could access their articles, and diligent Wikipedia editors could verify facts against original articles on vitamin deficiency and blood donation. But some journals, such as these titles, are no longer available from the publisher’s websites, and are only available through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. Since 2017, the Internet Archive joined others in concentrating on archiving all scholarly literature and making it permanently accessible.”

University of North Carolina Libraries: Scholarly publishing at the tipping point

University of North Carolina Libraries: Scholarly publishing at the tipping point. “Last year, the University Libraries paid Elsevier, a Dutch company, $2.49 million for its package. This year the cost was $2.6 million – a 4.5% increase for the exact same package. The Library is in negotiations with several publishers including Elsevier, the world’s largest publisher of scientific information. Nothing has been decided; talks could continue into early 2020.”

Science: More than 700 German research institutions strike open-access deal with Springer Nature

Science: More than 700 German research institutions strike open-access deal with Springer Nature. “A consortium of more than 700 German research institutions and libraries today announced an agreement with publisher Springer Nature to make it simpler for authors to publish their papers open access. The agreement is the largest national open-access deal to date, but it doesn’t allow authors to publish open access in Nature or its sister journals.”

Nature: Hundreds of extreme self-citing scientists revealed in new database

Nature: Hundreds of extreme self-citing scientists revealed in new database. “[Sundarapandian] Vaidyanathan, a computer scientist at the Vel Tech R&D Institute of Technology, a privately run institute, is an extreme example: he has received 94% of his citations from himself or his co-authors up to 2017, according to a study in PLoS Biology this month1. He is not alone. The data set, which lists around 100,000 researchers, shows that at least 250 scientists have amassed more than 50% of their citations from themselves or their co-authors, while the median self-citation rate is 12.7%.”

TorrentFreak: Anti-Piracy Efforts Are Unlikely to Beat Sci-Hub

TorrentFreak: Anti-Piracy Efforts Are Unlikely to Beat Sci-Hub. “Elsevier and other academic publishers see ‘pirate’ site Sci-Hub as a major threat to their billion-dollar industries. Many researchers, however, can’t function properly without the notorious site. Since anti-piracy efforts are unlikely to beat the site, perhaps it’s time for the publishers to draw a lesson from Sci-Hub instead?”

Science: In departure for NIH, Cancer Moonshot requires grantees to make papers immediately free

Science: In departure for NIH, Cancer Moonshot requires grantees to make papers immediately free. “The long-standing debate over open access to research results has been marked by a geographic divide. In Europe, some public funders have launched a high-profile open-access initiative, dubbed Plan S, that would ultimately require grantees to publish only in journals that immediately make papers free to all. But in the United States, federal agencies have stuck to a decade-old policy that allows grantees to publish in journals that keep papers behind a paywall for up to 1 year. Now, the divide is starting to blur, with one prominent U.S. research program starting to require immediate open access to the peer-reviewed publications it funds.”

MIT News: The MIT Press releases a comprehensive report on open-source publishing software

MIT News: The MIT Press releases a comprehensive report on open-source publishing software. “The MIT Press has announced the release of a comprehensive report on the current state of all available open-source software for publishing. ‘Mind the Gap,’ funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, ‘shed[s] light on the development and deployment of open source publishing technologies in order to aid institutions’ and individuals’ decision-making and project planning,’ according to its introduction. It will be an unparalleled resource for the scholarly publishing community and complements the recently released Mapping the Scholarly Communication Landscape census.”

Science: UC faculty members quit Cell Press editorial boards over impasse with publisher

Science: UC faculty members quit Cell Press editorial boards over impasse with publisher. “Some of the University of California’s (UC’s) most prominent scientists have announced they will resign from editorial boards of Cell Press to protest the continuing impasse between its owner, publishing giant Elsevier, and UC over subscription costs and open access to articles.”

Meet the PubMed Central Team: Perfectionists with a Sense of Humor (NLM In Focus)

NLM In Focus: Meet the PubMed Central Team: Perfectionists with a Sense of Humor. “Data constantly comes in from publishers and vendors that need to be processed by the PubMed Central (PMC) team. These data add up quickly, adding more than 40,000 articles each month to NLM’s full-text digital archive of journal literature. In order for the article data to be publicly accessible as quickly as possible, the PMC team needs to work with precision and perfection.”

UC faculty to Elsevier: Restart negotiations, or else (Berkeley News)

Berkeley News: UC faculty to Elsevier: Restart negotiations, or else. “A group of prominent University of California faculty say they will step away from the editorial boards of scientific journals published by Elsevier until the publishing giant agrees to restart negotiations, which stalled in February and left the 10-campus system without subscriptions to some of the world’s top scholarly journals.”

UC Santa Cruz: UC Santa Cruz joins the international effort to make research accessible to all

UC Santa Cruz: UC Santa Cruz joins the international effort to make research accessible to all . “In June, the University of California Santa Cruz joined its sister UC campuses in taking an important step towards the goal of making all scholarly journal literature freely available to the world by endorsing the international open access (OA) initiative, OA2020. Led by the Max Planck Digital Library, OA2020 is a global alliance committed to new models of scholarly publishing that ensure outputs are open and re-usable and that the costs behind their dissemination are transparent and economically sustainable.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: As Scholars Are Driven to Less Prestigious Journals, New Measures of Quality Emerge

Chronicle of Higher Education: As Scholars Are Driven to Less Prestigious Journals, New Measures of Quality Emerge. “As more scholars publish in less-recognized open-access journals, the search is on for other ways to measure the impact of their research. One potential measure of reach is in online sharing: posts on Twitter, blog links, and other engagement metrics of various kinds. HuMetricsHSS, a humanities and social-sciences project that tracks indicators in those fields, includes as another such metric ‘openness,’ including a researcher’s ‘transparency, candor, and accountability, in addition to the practice of making one’s research open access at all stages.'”

Chronicle of Higher Education: A Turning Point for Scholarly Publishing

Chronicle of Higher Education: A Turning Point for Scholarly Publishing. “Debate over the future of scholarly publishing felt remote to Kathryn M. Jones, an associate professor of biology at Florida State University — that is, until she attended a Faculty Senate meeting last year. There she learned that the library might renegotiate its $2-million subscription with the publishing behemoth Elsevier, which would limit her and her colleagues’ access to groundbreaking research. Horror sank in. Like other experimental scientists, Jones regularly skims articles published in subscription journals to plan future experiments. What would happen if she couldn’t access that body of important work with the click of a button?”

US News & World Report: U.S. News Considers Evaluating Law School Scholarly Impact

US News & World Report: U.S. News Considers Evaluating Law School Scholarly Impact. “U.S. News & World Report is expanding its Best Law Schools data collection with the goal of creating a new ranking that would evaluate the scholarly impact of law schools across the U.S. The intent is to analyze each law school’s scholarly impact based on a number of accepted indicators that measure its faculty’s productivity and impact using citations, publications and other bibliometric measures.”

Minnesota Daily: New website simplifies scholarly articles

Minnesota Daily: New website simplifies scholarly articles. “Current and former University of Minnesota students are hoping to create a ‘SparkNotes’ for scholarly articles with a new website. Bibliate is a subscription-based online tool that rehashes and summarizes articles from the subjects of anthropology, biology, history, political science and psychology. Founded by 2018 University alumnus Andrew Swisher, the company launched on Jan. 14 with the help of fellow students.”