WSMV: ‘How to’ videos of false positive Covid tests removed from TikTok

WSMV: ‘How to’ videos of false positive Covid tests removed from TikTok. “Faking a positive Covid test to get out of school is what some students in the United Kingdom are doing and they are putting their fake COVID tests on social media. TikTok blocked the hashtag ‘fake Covid tests’ because some TikTok users in the United Kingdom were posting videos of how to create a fake positive COVID test.”

Lifehacker: How to Help Your Kids Transition Back into School

Lifehacker: How to Help Your Kids Transition Back into School. “Transitioning kids back into the classroom after a three-month summer hiatus is often a challenge. Even the transition back to school after a couple of weeks off for winter break can send some kids into a tailspin. And now, as schools across the country plan to reopen, many families are facing the Mother of All Transitions—getting kids back into the classroom after a literal year at home.”

MIT Technology Review: Kids are sick of Zoom too—so their teachers are getting creative

MIT Technology Review: Kids are sick of Zoom too—so their teachers are getting creative. “A few times a week, Vincent Buyssens’s students in Mechelen, Belgium’s Thomas More University College get on Instagram while he’s lecturing about creative strategy. They swipe through stories, add posts to their profile, and get lost in rabbit holes. But they’re not being surreptitious about it; in fact, Buyssens requires those taking his college course to use the app. The more they scroll during his lecture, the better.”

Open Culture: Explore a Digital Archive of Student Notebooks from Around the World (1773-Present)

New-to-me, from Open Culture: Explore a Digital Archive of Student Notebooks from Around the World (1773-Present). “To bring back memories of your schooldays, there’s nothing quite like the sight of your old exercise books. This holds true whether you went to school in Ghana in the 2010s, Italy in the 90s, France in the 80s, China in the 70s, Japan in the 60s, or India in the 50s. All of these examples and many more have come available to view at the Exercise Book Archive, an ‘ever-growing, participatory archive of old exercise books that allows everyone to discover the history, education, and daily life of children and youth of the past.’”

Poynter: How Black parents juggle their work and kids’ virtual schooling during the pandemic

Poynter: How Black parents juggle their work and kids’ virtual schooling during the pandemic. “On a mild August afternoon, Asia Mitchell styles hair in the living room of her two-bedroom apartment as she talks on the phone. In the background are voices of some of her children — ranging in age from 2 months to 14 years old — asking her for help with their schoolwork. Like thousands of parents throughout Atlanta and its neighboring counties, Mitchell juggles her job and supervising her children’s virtual learning while schools are closed because of the coronavirus.”

Keystone: No One Knows How to Best Protect the 26 Million Kids Who Take the Bus to School

Keystone: No One Knows How to Best Protect the 26 Million Kids Who Take the Bus to School. “School districts nationwide puzzling over how to safely educate children during a pandemic have a more immediate challenge — getting 26 million bus-riding students there in the first place. Few challenges are proving to be more daunting than figuring out how to maintain social distance on school buses. A wide array of strategies have emerged to reduce the health risks but nobody has found a silver bullet.”

Virtual school: Teachers want to improve but training varies (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Virtual school: Teachers want to improve but training varies. “With remote learning part of an increasing number of fall reopening plans, districts are facing pressure to improve after many students got left behind this spring in the scramble to close schools during the coronavirus pandemic. But investment in training varies widely. While some school systems have offered new guidance on teaching from afar, many educators feel like they’re on their own.”

Newsweek: Texas Teachers Writing Their Wills as State Promises to Open Schools in Fall

Newsweek: Texas Teachers Writing Their Wills as State Promises to Open Schools in Fall. “After Texas Governor Greg Abbott unveiled a plan in June to reopen his state’s schools, some teachers have said holding in-person classes while the coronavirus still poses a threat could place them in danger. Under Abbott’s plan, schools in Texas will be required to provide in-person instruction five days a week starting in August. Although parents and guardians may opt to have their children engage in long-distance learning, teachers must report to work in person.”

The Chattanoogan: NFHS Offers Free Online COVID-19 Informational Courses For Coaches And Administrators

The Chattanoogan: NFHS Offers Free Online COVID-19 Informational Courses For Coaches And Administrators. “The COVID 19 pandemic presents a myriad of challenges to high school athletic and activity programs. To help address some of those challenges, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) has developed a new free online course ‘COVID-19 for Coaches and Administrators.’ The course includes information from the ‘Guidance for Opening Up High School Athletics and Activities’ document that was released by the NFHS in May for its 51 member state high school associations to consider in restarting high school athletics and other activity programs across the nation.”

AZ Central: As Trump pushes to reopen schools, Arizona school leaders face more uncertainty

AZ Central: As Trump pushes to reopen schools, Arizona school leaders face more uncertainty. “As President Donald Trump’s administration pushes for schools to reopen on time, a small community in eastern Arizona is reeling from the death of a teacher who contracted COVID-19 after she taught summer school virtually while in the same room as two other teachers. The school district’s superintendent, Jeff Gregorich, said three teachers went above and beyond in taking precautions against the spread of the virus while teaching in the same room, but all three contracted COVID-19.”

From anti-vax to anti-mask: School districts brace for parent resistance (Politico)

Politico: From anti-vax to anti-mask: School districts brace for parent resistance. “California’s anti-vaccine movement has a new target: masks. The same parents who loudly opposed school vaccine requirements in Sacramento last year are turning their attention to mask recommendations that districts are considering as they figure out how to send kids back to the classroom in the middle of a pandemic.”

NPR: U.S. Pediatricians Call For In-Person School This Fall

NPR: U.S. Pediatricians Call For In-Person School This Fall. “The nation’s pediatricians have come out with a strong statement in favor of bringing children back to the classroom this fall wherever and whenever they can do so safely. The American Academy of Pediatrics’ guidance ‘strongly advocates that all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with a goal of having students physically present in school.’”

New York Times: Remote School Is a Nightmare. Few in Power Care.

New York Times: Remote School Is a Nightmare. Few in Power Care.. “With expanded unemployment benefits set to expire at the end of July, many parents will have no choice but to return to work by September. Even for parents who can work from home, home schooling is often a crushing burden that’s destroying careers, mental health and family relationships. And online school has had dismal results, especially for poor, black and Hispanic students.”

University of Mississippi News: Mississippi Teacher Corps Offers Free Summer School Across State

University of Mississippi News: Mississippi Teacher Corps Offers Free Summer School Across State. “The Mississippi Teacher Corps, an alternate-route teacher preparation program housed at the University of Mississippi, has taken its annual summer school program online and will offer free summer classes to instate students in grades 7-12 and more. Designed for students in need of credit recovery or enrichment, the program will last from June 15 to July 17 and will meet online 9-11 a.m. weekdays. Registration for the virtual summer program opens at 5 p.m. June 9.”