Open Culture: Explore a Digital Archive of Student Notebooks from Around the World (1773-Present)

New-to-me, from Open Culture: Explore a Digital Archive of Student Notebooks from Around the World (1773-Present). “To bring back memories of your schooldays, there’s nothing quite like the sight of your old exercise books. This holds true whether you went to school in Ghana in the 2010s, Italy in the 90s, France in the 80s, China in the 70s, Japan in the 60s, or India in the 50s. All of these examples and many more have come available to view at the Exercise Book Archive, an ‘ever-growing, participatory archive of old exercise books that allows everyone to discover the history, education, and daily life of children and youth of the past.'”

Poynter: How Black parents juggle their work and kids’ virtual schooling during the pandemic

Poynter: How Black parents juggle their work and kids’ virtual schooling during the pandemic. “On a mild August afternoon, Asia Mitchell styles hair in the living room of her two-bedroom apartment as she talks on the phone. In the background are voices of some of her children — ranging in age from 2 months to 14 years old — asking her for help with their schoolwork. Like thousands of parents throughout Atlanta and its neighboring counties, Mitchell juggles her job and supervising her children’s virtual learning while schools are closed because of the coronavirus.”

Keystone: No One Knows How to Best Protect the 26 Million Kids Who Take the Bus to School

Keystone: No One Knows How to Best Protect the 26 Million Kids Who Take the Bus to School. “School districts nationwide puzzling over how to safely educate children during a pandemic have a more immediate challenge — getting 26 million bus-riding students there in the first place. Few challenges are proving to be more daunting than figuring out how to maintain social distance on school buses. A wide array of strategies have emerged to reduce the health risks but nobody has found a silver bullet.”

Virtual school: Teachers want to improve but training varies (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Virtual school: Teachers want to improve but training varies. “With remote learning part of an increasing number of fall reopening plans, districts are facing pressure to improve after many students got left behind this spring in the scramble to close schools during the coronavirus pandemic. But investment in training varies widely. While some school systems have offered new guidance on teaching from afar, many educators feel like they’re on their own.”

Newsweek: Texas Teachers Writing Their Wills as State Promises to Open Schools in Fall

Newsweek: Texas Teachers Writing Their Wills as State Promises to Open Schools in Fall. “After Texas Governor Greg Abbott unveiled a plan in June to reopen his state’s schools, some teachers have said holding in-person classes while the coronavirus still poses a threat could place them in danger. Under Abbott’s plan, schools in Texas will be required to provide in-person instruction five days a week starting in August. Although parents and guardians may opt to have their children engage in long-distance learning, teachers must report to work in person.”

The Chattanoogan: NFHS Offers Free Online COVID-19 Informational Courses For Coaches And Administrators

The Chattanoogan: NFHS Offers Free Online COVID-19 Informational Courses For Coaches And Administrators. “The COVID 19 pandemic presents a myriad of challenges to high school athletic and activity programs. To help address some of those challenges, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) has developed a new free online course ‘COVID-19 for Coaches and Administrators.’ The course includes information from the ‘Guidance for Opening Up High School Athletics and Activities’ document that was released by the NFHS in May for its 51 member state high school associations to consider in restarting high school athletics and other activity programs across the nation.”

AZ Central: As Trump pushes to reopen schools, Arizona school leaders face more uncertainty

AZ Central: As Trump pushes to reopen schools, Arizona school leaders face more uncertainty. “As President Donald Trump’s administration pushes for schools to reopen on time, a small community in eastern Arizona is reeling from the death of a teacher who contracted COVID-19 after she taught summer school virtually while in the same room as two other teachers. The school district’s superintendent, Jeff Gregorich, said three teachers went above and beyond in taking precautions against the spread of the virus while teaching in the same room, but all three contracted COVID-19.”

From anti-vax to anti-mask: School districts brace for parent resistance (Politico)

Politico: From anti-vax to anti-mask: School districts brace for parent resistance. “California’s anti-vaccine movement has a new target: masks. The same parents who loudly opposed school vaccine requirements in Sacramento last year are turning their attention to mask recommendations that districts are considering as they figure out how to send kids back to the classroom in the middle of a pandemic.”

NPR: U.S. Pediatricians Call For In-Person School This Fall

NPR: U.S. Pediatricians Call For In-Person School This Fall. “The nation’s pediatricians have come out with a strong statement in favor of bringing children back to the classroom this fall wherever and whenever they can do so safely. The American Academy of Pediatrics’ guidance ‘strongly advocates that all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with a goal of having students physically present in school.'”

New York Times: Remote School Is a Nightmare. Few in Power Care.

New York Times: Remote School Is a Nightmare. Few in Power Care.. “With expanded unemployment benefits set to expire at the end of July, many parents will have no choice but to return to work by September. Even for parents who can work from home, home schooling is often a crushing burden that’s destroying careers, mental health and family relationships. And online school has had dismal results, especially for poor, black and Hispanic students.”

Phys .org: 1/3 of parents in 3 states may not send children to school because of COVID-19

Phys .org: 1/3 of parents in 3 states may not send children to school because of COVID-19. “And as lawmakers and educators reimagine the K-12 model for fall, a new survey assessed parents’ plans for in-person school and support for 15 potential measures to reduce the risk of COVID-19 in schools in Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio.”

University of Mississippi News: Mississippi Teacher Corps Offers Free Summer School Across State

University of Mississippi News: Mississippi Teacher Corps Offers Free Summer School Across State. “The Mississippi Teacher Corps, an alternate-route teacher preparation program housed at the University of Mississippi, has taken its annual summer school program online and will offer free summer classes to instate students in grades 7-12 and more. Designed for students in need of credit recovery or enrichment, the program will last from June 15 to July 17 and will meet online 9-11 a.m. weekdays. Registration for the virtual summer program opens at 5 p.m. June 9.”

SoraNews24: Japanese students hold graduation ceremony in Minecraft amid school cancellation

SoraNews24: Japanese students hold graduation ceremony in Minecraft amid school cancellation. “Because the Japanese school year ends in March and begins in April, for many students this closing period means that they mill miss their graduation ceremonies. Whether they’re leaving elementary school, middle school, or high school, it’s a sad feeling for them to go out with a whimper instead of a bang. But some creative elementary school graduates in Japan came up with a great workaround. If they couldn’t have a graduation ceremony at school, then why not have one digitally in a place they all meet often anyway… in Minecraft!”

Publishers Weekly: How Kids’ Lit Is Responding to the Coronavirus

Publishers Weekly: How Kids’ Lit Is Responding to the Coronavirus. “With widespread school and library closures due to the new coronavirus outbreak, children’s authors and publishers are going digital to provide kids with ways to read, draw, engage, and support other children who might need a helping hand. PW is tracking some of the most exciting efforts on social media and across the web, and will be updating our list regularly.”

Amazing Educational Resources: Educational Companies Offering Free Subscriptions due to School Closings

It started off as a Google Sheet and then it moved to its own domain because it got really, really big: Amazing Educational Resources. It’s described on the front page as “Education Companies Offering Free Subscriptions due to School Closings (Updated) : Amazing Educational Resources.” There are also links to a Facebook support group.