Smithsonian Magazine: A Dictionary of Science Fiction Runs From Afrofuturism to Zero-G

Smithsonian Magazine: A Dictionary of Science Fiction Runs From Afrofuturism to Zero-G. “In the summer of 1987, movie audiences first met Robocop in the science fiction classic about violence and corrupt corporate power in a future, dystopian Detroit. But the title word is much older than that, going back at least to a 1957 short story by writer Harlan Ellison, in which a tentacled “robocop” pursues a character. The prefix ‘robo-,’ in turn, dates at least to 1945, when Astounding Science Fiction published a story by A.E. van Vogt mentioning ‘roboplanes’ flying through the sky…. This is the kind of rabbit hole a reader can go down in the Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction, a resource decades in the making that is now available to the public in an accessible form. Lexicographer Jesse Sheidlower started the project years ago, when he was an editor at the Oxford English Dictionary.

Tor: Look Up That SF Term in the New Online Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction

Tor: Look Up That SF Term in the New Online Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction. “The crowd-sourced project comes from Jesse Sheidlower, a former editor-at-large from the Oxford English Dictionary—it originated as an OED initiative, and is now a standalone site. The dictionary is designed to not only put definitions to the genre’s terminology, but to show how those words have been used over time.”

Penn State News: Behrend professor leading effort to create a digitized ‘Frankenstein’

Penn State News: Behrend professor leading effort to create a digitized ‘Frankenstein’. “In 2017, [Elisa] Beshero-Bondar joined colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Maryland in an effort to digitally collate all five versions of ‘Frankenstein’: Shelley’s original draft, written in 1816 for a ghost story challenge at the home of the poet Lord Byron; the manuscript published in 1818; the ‘Thomas copy,’ in which Shelley had hand-written edits in the margins of the 1818 book; the 1823 version, which was published by Shelley’s father and was the first to recognize her as the author; and the 1831 edition, which is the version most familiar to anyone who read ‘Frankenstein’ in high school or college.” The entire manuscript collection is not online yet; it’s about 1/3 complete.

io9: Some of the Scientific Minds Behind the UK’s Coronavirus Response Have Helped Fund a New Sci-Fi Pandemic Comic

io9: Some of the Scientific Minds Behind the UK’s Coronavirus Response Have Helped Fund a New Sci-Fi Pandemic Comic. “io9 can exclusively reveal the first look at Planet DIVOC-91, a 9-part satirical sci-fi webcomic being produced by Dr Bella Starling, Director of Vocal at Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust and Sara Kenney, Creative Director at Wowbagger Productions, in association with the UK Academy of Medical Sciences. Featuring a cavalcade of comics talent across each chapter, Planet DIVOC-91 wants to tell a fictional, sometimes absurd story about an intergalactic pandemic while educated readers about the threats faced closer to home with our current grasp of the novel coronavirus crisis.”

ZDNet: How to binge watch some great classic sci-fi for free

ZDNet: How to binge watch some great classic sci-fi for free. ” Are you SO BORED YOU COULD SCREAM?!? Yeah, you’re not alone. And while I can’t provide you with any new science fiction on TV, or even reassure you that there will EVER be new science fiction on TV, I can take you down memory lane, into the ultra-secret vaults where some classic science fiction series have gone to hide out the pandemic.”

A New Database of Star Trek Books

Via Reddit, I learned about a new database of Star Trek books. From the About page: “The purpose of this website is to provide a searchable database of Star Trek novels to make it easier for fans of written Star Trek fiction to find books to read. This unofficial database allows you to find books by keyword, author, series, captain, starship, TV show and year. I have attempted to sort all books in chronological order using the various sources listed below, but there were some contradictions and inconsistencies.”

The Digital Fix: Forbidden Planet open up their archives and share previously unseen photos from their in-store signings

The Digital Fix: Forbidden Planet open up their archives and share previously unseen photos from their in-store signings.. “Forbidden Planet have made available for the first time a treasure trove of images from their instore events – including photos of some of their most famous guests. You can now find full details, including photographs, flyers and posters, from all of our events from 1978 to 1989, including signings with Mark Hamill and Dave Prowse, James Doohan, Nick Rhodes, Jon Pertwee, Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman, Anne McCaffrey and many, many more.” More content will be available in the fall.

University of Iowa: Fanzines of science fiction, fantasy and horror available to read and transcribe

University of Iowa: Fanzines of science fiction, fantasy and horror available to read and transcribe. “What would you do with thousands of fragile leaflets, known as fanzines, that chronicle the history of science fiction? Such fanzines hold rich information too valuable to sit untouched, yet the materials cannot be handled without risking destruction. At the University of Iowa Libraries, a digitization project is underway to save a large, notable zine collection.”

University of California Riverside: Nearly 6,000 Photographs from the Jay Kay Klein Papers Have Been Digitized

University of California Riverside: Nearly 6,000 Photographs from the Jay Kay Klein Papers Have Been Digitized. “The California Digital Library and the UCR Library recently partnered to digitize nearly 6,000 photographs from the Jay Kay Klein papers – and completed the task in less than two days…. This was the first in a series of pilot projects to use Pixel Acuity’s specialized mass digitization process to make more of the UCR Library’s non-book collections available online. For this inaugural project, [Eric] Milenkiewicz selected 35mm negatives from the Eaton Collection’s Jay Kay Klein papers (MS 381),documenting the World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) from 1960-1971.”

PR Newswire: Jerrick Unveils The Omni Archive: Entire Collection of Iconic Sci-Fi Magazine Now Available Online (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Jerrick Unveils The Omni Archive: Entire Collection of Iconic Sci-Fi Magazine Now Available Online (PRESS RELEASE). “Through The Omni Archive, all 200 issues of the published magazines are available for viewing and purchase on Amazon. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the nonprofit organization Museum of Science Fiction (MOSF), the world’s first comprehensive science fiction museum in Washington, D.C. This is the first time the collection has been available for digital download in high-resolution.”

Creating a Digital Library of Harlan Ellison

An effort is underway to create a digital library for the works and papers of science fiction author Harlan Ellison. “Harlan Ellison has never made a secret of his dislike for computers, but as a practical citizen of the 21st century, he has interacted with his friends and readers via HarlanEllison.com for nearly two decades and established an online, print-on-demand imprint (Edgeworks Abbey) to release sixteen all-new compilations of his work at HarlanEllisonBooks.com. Now it’s time to preserve the Ellison legacy for the digital age with the creation of the Edgeworks Abbey Archive. What is the Edgeworks Abbey Archive? A digital library of Harlan’s entire literary oeuvre created from thousands of papers filed in his home office.”