South China Morning Post: Popular science blogs disappear from WeChat, Weibo and Bilibili in Beijing’s latest internet content crackdown

South China Morning Post: Popular science blogs disappear from WeChat, Weibo and Bilibili in Beijing’s latest internet content crackdown. “Two popular science blogs in China were censored across social media platforms WeChat, Weibo and video-streaming site Bilibili, a surprising turn in Beijing’s escalating crackdown on internet content.”

Science: European law could improve ‘scandalous’ lack of clinical trial data reporting

Science: European law could improve ‘scandalous’ lack of clinical trial data reporting. “A total of 3846 European trials—nearly 28% of 13,874 completed trials in the EU Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) on 1 July—had not posted their results on the register, according to the latest data from the EU Trials Tracker, set up by U.K. researchers in 2018 to expose lax reporting. Public research hospitals and universities, not drugmakers, are responsible for the vast majority of the lapses, which appear to violate European rules that require sponsors to post their results within 1 year of a trial’s conclusion.”

Making climate impact science more accessible to the public: ISIpedia launch (Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)

Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research: Making climate impact science more accessible to the public: ISIpedia launch. “The name ISIpedia is a short form for Inter-Sectoral Impacts Encyclopedia. It is based on research carried out under the Inter-sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) which is working with roughly 100 research groups worldwide. By systematically comparing the different computer simulations of climate impacts, the project is working towards consistent robust projections of climate change impacts across different sectors and scales. The ISIpedia portal is free, open-access and professional users can download the processed data used in the analyses as well as the raw data.”

Teaching Anatomy & Physiology on YouTube: Mrs. Reid, the Science G

I was searching YouTube when I came across a channel called Mrs. Reid, the Science G. From her About page: “Me and my sisters would remix songs when we were younger (waaay before YouTube), so it’s safe to say, I have had years of practice on how to create songs. As a science educator, I get to blend my two loves: music and education and I’m so EXCITED to share this journey with you!!!” I don’t know any of the music she’s redone because I’m old, but I did enjoy a remixed Cardi B called BODY PARTS AND BODY REGIONS; her music tends to focus on Anatomy & Physiology topics. She also has some A&P lectures available. Really good and recommended.

Communicating Science: Home (University of Illinois Library)

A new resource from my friend Laura, who does the excellent Environmental News Bits. From the University of Illinois Library: Communicating Science: Home. “A beginner’s guide for Prairie Research Institute researchers to learn how to effectively communicate their science.” Some of the materials are specific to the university, but most of it is open. Good stuff and lots of it.

University of Cambridge: The archive of Stephen Hawking has been saved for the nation

University of Cambridge: The archive of Stephen Hawking has been saved for the nation. “A treasure trove of archive papers and personal objects – from Hawking’s seminal works on theoretical physics to scripts from episodes of The Simpsons – are to be divided between two of the UK’s leading cultural institutions following a landmark Acceptance in Lieu (AIL) agreement on behalf of the nation.”

International Journalists’ Network: Journalists can combat scientific misinformation with Science Pulse tool

International Journalists’ Network: Journalists can combat scientific misinformation with Science Pulse tool. “A project of ICFJ Knight Fellow Sérgio Spagnuolo, Science Pulse aggregates English, Spanish and Portuguese social media posts from scientists, scientific organizations and other experts in its database. Rather than wade through Twitter and Facebook feeds, journalists can now use Science Pulse’s tools to stay on top of the latest research and other scientific news shared on social media.” ENGLISH READERS! When you go to the application page, look for the dropdown menu reading “Escolha o idioma dos tweets”. Choose Inglés and enjoy.

Popular Science: 9 cool ways your family can help scientists collect data

Popular Science: 9 cool ways your family can help scientists collect data. “Anyone with an interest in a project or topic, no matter their age or education level, can be a citizen scientist. It can be as simple as uploading a photo of a bird to an app, or as complex as building your own weather station and submitting detailed daily readings to an online database. It can be rewarding too, as this work has real impact and the number of studies using data from citizen science projects is on the rise.”

Discover Magazine: How To Spot Pseudoscience Online And IRL

Discover Magazine: How To Spot Pseudoscience Online And IRL. “Imagine a universe rife with cosmic catastrophes: Jupiter ejecting a comet into space that would later become the planet Venus. The comet whizzing past Earth and changing its rotation. The resulting chaos on Earth causing natural disasters of biblical proportions — literally — like the parting of the Red Sea. In the mid-1900s, Immanuel Velikovsky, a psychiatrist and author, claimed that he could prove these radical ideas. Velikovsky laid out his case in Worlds in Collision, a 1950 bestseller. But the book wasn’t billed as creative fiction or a fanciful hypothesis based on anecdotal accounts of the past; rather, Velikovsky presented these interplanetary theories, and others, as factual.” A lot of articles with this kind of headline are ten paragraphs of bromide. This is a deep dive with a lot of history. Recommended.

Rutgers University: Rutgers’ Eagleton Institute of Politics Launches First Public Database of Scientists in State Politics

Rutgers University: Rutgers’ Eagleton Institute of Politics Launches First Public Database of Scientists in State Politics. “The Science and Politics Initiative at Rutgers’ Eagleton Institute of Politics has launched the first publicly accessible national database of elected state legislators with scientific, engineering and health care training.”

Science Magazine: Want other scientists to cite you? Drop the jargon

Science Magazine: Want other scientists to cite you? Drop the jargon. “If you want your work to be highly cited, here’s one simple tip that might help: Steer clear of discipline-specific jargon in the title and abstract. That’s the conclusion of a new study of roughly 20,000 published papers about cave science, a multidisciplinary field that includes researchers who study the biology, geology, paleontology, and anthropology of caves. The most highly cited papers didn’t use any terms specific to cave science in the title and kept jargon to less than 2% of the text in the abstract; jargon-heavy papers were cited far less often.”

IAEA Data Animation: INIS Scientific Database Evolution Proves Power of Global Cooperation (International Atomic Energy Agency)

International Atomic Energy Agency: IAEA Data Animation: INIS Scientific Database Evolution Proves Power of Global Cooperation. “All for one and one for all: A new IAEA data animation demonstrates the power of global scientific collaboration, charting the 50-year evolution of the Agency’s International Nuclear Information System (INIS) into one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of scientific and technological literature which is now visited by around 8000 researchers every day. The animation shows the Repository’s exponential growth over five decades, breaking down the contributions by country and international organization.”

Catholic Courier: Vatican Observatory launches podcast, new website

Catholic Courier: Vatican Observatory launches podcast, new website. “The podcasts are available on several platforms and they feature one of the pope’s own Jesuit astronomers speaking with a notable figure in the world of space exploration or science. For example, one episode features Jesuit Brother Guy Consolmagno — a planetary scientist, director of the Vatican Observatory and president of the foundation — speaking with U.S. astronaut Nicole Stott and her husband Christopher Stott of the International Institute of Space Commerce.”

IOS Press: IOS Press Labs Goes Live

IOS Press: IOS Press Labs Goes Live. “Offering a platform that promotes collaboration and feedback, Labs content centers around the following categories: data management, innovation, open science, the research ecosystem, STM publishing, and technology. Topics of particular interest are: artificial intelligence; case studies; “failing forward;” corporate/brand identity; data policies/data sharing; digital transformation; diversity and inclusion; editorial policies; knowledge graphs; linked data; machine learning; open access; open source; publication ethics; software development; and workflow tools for scholarly publishing.”