Phys .org: By leap of faith? How to regain trust in science and expertise

Phys .org: By leap of faith? How to regain trust in science and expertise. “Fake news? Post-truth? Populism? In the current environment of growing scepticism about political institutions and a dismissal of journalism and scientific facts, public trust in expertise is seen as eroding. Such trends are often associated with a changing digital communication landscape where new responses and mechanisms are required to find common ground in public discourse and decision-making.”

Interesting Engineering: Internet Archivists Working Hard to Keep a “Pirate Bay of Science” Available Online

Interesting Engineering: Internet Archivists Working Hard to Keep a “Pirate Bay of Science” Available Online. “Scientific material is hard to come by online unless you’re ready to pay a pretty penny to access it. Many scientific papers and books are indeed available in an online format, however, they typically hide behind paywalls, leaving them unread by many. Two sites have been trying to remedy the situation by pirating scientific papers: Library Genesis (LibGen) and Sci-Hub. The issue is that sites like these have real problems staying online for legal and logistical hosting purposes. Now, a new project by data hoarders and freedom of information activists is trying to bring long-term stability to LibGen.”

Phys .org: Predicting research results can mean better science and better advice

Phys .org: Predicting research results can mean better science and better advice. “We ask experts for advice all the time. A company might ask an economist for advice on how to motivate its employees. A government might ask what the effect of a policy reform will be. To give the advice, experts often would like to draw on the results of an experiment. But they don’t always have relevant experimental evidence. Collecting expert predictions about research results could be a powerful new tool to help improve science—and the advice scientists give.”

Telescope: a tool to manage bioinformatics analyses on mobile devices (Tech Xplore)

Tech Xplore: Telescope: a tool to manage bioinformatics analyses on mobile devices. “A team of researchers at UCLA, the University of São Paulo, the Federal University of São Carlos and the University of Southern California has recently developed an interactive tool for managing large-scale bioinformatic analyses in real-time and from portable devices. This new tool, called Telescope, was first presented in a paper pre-published on arXiv.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Archives Digitize Decades of Mellon Institute Records

Carnegie Mellon University: Archives Digitize Decades of Mellon Institute Records. “Carnegie Mellon’s University Libraries have organized and preserved 347 boxes of records from the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, one of the nation’s premier independent research centers, making the records more widely discoverable and available to researchers…. Since its inception in 1913, the Mellon Institute engaged the brightest scientific minds of its time to develop, test, and refine new chemical, biological, and materials science innovations on behalf of its corporate partners. In the process, the institute defined the profession of sponsored research, spun off successful companies such as the Dow Corning and Union Carbide corporations, and developed industry-changing technologies.”

Techdirt: It’s Time For The Academic World To See The Positive Side Of Negative Results

Techdirt: It’s Time For The Academic World To See The Positive Side Of Negative Results. “Techdirt has written many times about the need to move from traditional academic publishing to open access. There are many benefits, including increasing the reach and impact of research, and allowing members of the public to read work that they have often funded, without needing to pay again. But open access is not a panacea; it does not solve all the problems of today’s approach to spreading knowledge. In particular, it suffers from the same serious flaw that afflicts traditional titles: a tendency to focus on success, and to draw a veil of silence over failure.”

The Conversation: Science needs myths to thrive

The Conversation: Science needs myths to thrive. “What helped me develop as a researcher was reading stories about those who came before me. For scientific research to be successful in the long term, I think researchers need a strong set of values, including an unwavering commitment to the truth, and a drive to test any idea to destruction. Though they may seem opposed to the ideals of the rigorous scientific method, the best way of instilling these values is, as ever, through the stories and myths that we tell ourselves.”