University of Washington: Who’s tweeting about scientific research? And why?

University of Washington: Who’s tweeting about scientific research? And why?. “Scientists candidly tweet about their unpublished research not only to one another but also to a broader audience of engaged laypeople. When consumers of cutting-edge science tweet or retweet about studies they find interesting, they leave behind a real-time record of the impact that taxpayer-funded research is having within academia and beyond.”

Scientific American: A Grassroots Effort to Fight Misinformation During the Pandemic

Scientific American: A Grassroots Effort to Fight Misinformation During the Pandemic. “During the height of the deadly COVID-19 pandemic, with misinformation permeating every form of media, members of the public were growing increasingly concerned for their health and seeking answers about the virus, its mode of transmission and how to protect themselves and their loved ones. Five organizations came together, recruited hundreds of volunteer scientists and built a new tool to get the best scientific information in plain language to millions of people around the world. This is the story of that project.”

Wired: America’s Top Science Journal Has Had It With Trump

I apologize for the politics. Wired: America’s Top Science Journal Has Had It With Trump. “WITH AN ARCHIVE that goes back to 1880 and a reputation for publishing world-changing research, the journal Science is the apex predator of academic publishing. Getting an article past its gatekeepers and peer reviewers can make a researcher’s career; the journal’s news section is a model for high-level reporting on everything from quarks to viruses to blue whales to galactic clusters. Along with its competitors Cell and Nature, the journal represents not just new knowledge but also the cultural mores of the world it covers—innovation, integrity, accuracy, rectitude, fealty to data. So it’s surprising (but maybe not as much as you think) that Science’s newish editor-in-chief has focused a laser-like stream of neural energy at calling out the crummy pandemic policies of the Trump administration.”

Phys .org: Researchers trace the outlines of two cultures within science

Phys .org: Researchers trace the outlines of two cultures within science. “In the world of scientific research today, there’s a revolution going on—over the last decade or so, scientists across many disciplines have been seeking to improve the workings of science and its methods. To do this, scientists are largely following one of two paths: the movement for reproducibility and the movement for open science. Both movements aim to create centralized archives for data, computer code and other resources, but from there, the paths diverge.”

Thomson Reuters Foundation News: New website by Senegalese AI expert spotlights Africans in STEM

Thomson Reuters Foundation News: New website by Senegalese AI expert spotlights Africans in STEM. “Growing up in a trading town in Senegal, Adji Bousso Dieng loved school and had a particular talent for maths. But with a dearth of career role models, she had no idea which path to follow. Some two decades later and a research scientist working on artificial intelligence at Google, Dieng wants to give young Africans the inspiring examples she missed out on….This month, Dieng launched a website called ‘The Africa I Know’, which features profiles of successful African professionals working in fields such as science, technology and engineering.”

Phys .org: Antarctica is still free of COVID-19. Can it stay that way?

Phys .org: Antarctica is still free of COVID-19. Can it stay that way?. “At this very moment a vast world exists that’s free of the coronavirus, where people can mingle without masks and watch the pandemic unfold from thousands of miles away. That world is Antarctica, the only continent without COVID-19. Now, as nearly 1,000 scientists and others who wintered over on the ice are seeing the sun for the first time in weeks or months, a global effort wants to make sure incoming colleagues don’t bring the virus with them.”

Arizona State University: General public sees government science advisers through political lens, ASU researcher finds

Arizona State University: General public sees government science advisers through political lens, ASU researcher finds. “What people think of the scientists who advise the federal government partially depends on their own political persuasion and where the scientists work, according to new findings published this week by an Arizona State University researcher. The study highlights the risk of politicizing scientific advice given to government agencies.”

Poynter: Scientific American, the oldest U.S. magazine, hits another milestone as the appetite for science news heats up

Poynter: Scientific American, the oldest U.S. magazine, hits another milestone as the appetite for science news heats up. “While the nation’s news cycle was focused last week on Hurricane Laura, the Republican National Convention and protests over another painful police shooting, the country’s oldest continuously published magazine celebrated its 175th birthday. Not all that quietly, either. Scientific American’s special anniversary issue dropped Friday. It has two themes — articles of note from that very long lifespan woven into features on the biggest things we have learned about science and how we learned them over the last 175 years.”

EurekAlert: Smartphones prove to be time-saving analytical tools

EurekAlert: Smartphones prove to be time-saving analytical tools. “Seemingly everyone has a smartphone in their pocket, and we find new uses for them every day. They can help us avoid traffic jams or connect us to family from afar. They can even translate languages on the fly. Now, scientists have figured out a new trick. Using a regular smartphone camera and some 3D-printed tools, they’ve developed an easier way to measure soil density.”

Scientific American: How to Evaluate COVID-19 News without Freaking Out

Scientific American: How to Evaluate COVID-19 News without Freaking Out. “Carl Bergstrom, a professor of biology at the University of Washington, is an expert on how information flows in science and society. He and his University of Washington colleague Jevin West teach a course on data reasoning in the digital world (its materials are available online). They have also written a book based on the course, Calling Bullshit: The Art of Skepticism in a Data-Driven World, which is set to be published this Tuesday. Bergstrom has monitored the pandemic closely, sharing frequent updates on Twitter and countering disinformation. Scientific American spoke with him about his tool kit for navigating the daily deluge of news about the novel coronavirus, from finding reliable sources to interpreting reporting about preprint research.”

Phys .org: High time to open up ecological research

Phys .org: High time to open up ecological research. “Share the code and data behind the research please. It’s easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science. That is the clear message from a new paper in PLOS Biology. An international team of ecologists found that currently, only about a quarter of the scientific papers in their field publicly shares computer code for analyses. ‘To make the science of ecology more transparent and reproducible, sharing is urgently needed.'”

The Verge: How the world’s biggest general science society is tackling racism

The Verge: How the world’s biggest general science society is tackling racism. “The world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific society has decided to take on systemic racism. The move by The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), publisher of the esteemed Science journals, comes after Black scientists came forward to protest racism within academia and the sciences, and organized a strike on June 10th, that AAAS joined. In a letter to its 120,000 members this month, AAAS CEO Sudip Parikh announced that the 172-year-old institution has come up with a plan to hold itself accountable for making itself and the sciences more diverse.”

Marie Claire: Lyda Hill Philanthropies Launches the IF/THEN Collection to Educate About Women In STEM

Marie Claire: Lyda Hill Philanthropies Launches the IF/THEN Collection to Educate About Women In STEM. “The online resource features photos and videos of more than 125 female STEM change-makers selected by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Lyda Hill Philanthropies to be IF/THEN ambassadors. The diverse group of women, who represent a range of backgrounds, will serve as role models for young women interested in the sciences and technology.”

MobiHealthNews: Doctors tweet swimsuit photos in rebuke of critical journal article

MobiHealthNews: Doctors tweet swimsuit photos in rebuke of critical journal article. “A new twitter movement dubbed #MedBikini has emerged after a research article published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery concluded that half of the recent and soon-to-be graduates in vascular surgery has social media accounts with ‘unprofessional content.'”

British Library: Our new Science web archive collection

British Library: Our new Science web archive collection. “We have interpreted ‘science’ widely to include engineering and communications, but not IT, as that already has a collection. Our collection is arranged according to the standard disciplines such as biology, chemistry, engineering, earth sciences and physics, and then subdivided according to their common divisions, based on the treatment of science in the Universal Decimal Classification.”