Science Magazine: What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’

Science Magazine: What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’. “Nearly a decade ago, headlines highlighted a disturbing trend in science: The number of articles retracted by journals had increased 10-fold during the previous 10 years. Fraud accounted for some 60% of those retractions; one offender, anesthesiologist Joachim Boldt, had racked up almost 90 retractions after investigators concluded he had fabricated data and committed other ethical violations. Boldt may have even harmed patients by encouraging the adoption of an unproven surgical treatment. Science, it seemed, faced a mushrooming crisis. The alarming news came with some caveats. “

From Old Letters Preserved In Godrej Cabinets To One-Of-A-Kind Scientific Equipment, A Peek Inside NCBS Bengaluru’s Upcoming Scientific Archive (Huffpost)

Huffpost: From Old Letters Preserved In Godrej Cabinets To One-Of-A-Kind Scientific Equipment, A Peek Inside NCBS Bengaluru’s Upcoming Scientific Archive. “Walking into what looked like a disused laboratory at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) in Bengaluru, Venkat Srinivasan looked back with an apologetic smile. ‘This is just temporary, while we prepare the space downstairs,’ he said. The room still had some equipment, but that was not what we were here to see.”

San Francisco State University: New grant aims to flip stereotypes about scientists, one story at a time

San Francisco State University: New grant aims to flip stereotypes about scientists, one story at a time. “Reading through her middle schooler’s science homework one day, Kimberly Tanner noticed a glaring absence: examples of women and people of color doing science. Two years later, Tanner is part of a collaborative project to diversify the scientists featured in middle and high school science lessons, funded by a $1.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health….Over the next two years, students at San Francisco State and Foothill College will create hundreds of ‘Scientist Spotlights’ — short science assignments that highlight currently practicing scientists from a variety of backgrounds. Since the spotlights also teach important course concepts, teachers can use them in their own curricula as homework assignments or replacements for textbook readings.”

Physics Today: Online tool breaks down physicists’ research interests

Physics Today: Online tool breaks down physicists’ research interests. “Terms like cosmologist, string theorist, or particle physicist rarely capture the true scope of a scientist’s work. A new website aims to provide a more complete picture. Launched in July, Scimeter allows researchers to create word clouds based on the topics of their arXiv papers, search for scientists with similar interests, and find experts whose work best matches given keywords.”

Library of Congress: Science Blogs Web Archive

Library of Congress: Science Blogs Web Archive. “This guest post is an interview with Lisa Massengale, Head of the Science Reference Section, with contributions by the Web Archive’s creator Jennifer Harbster, a Science Reference and Research Specialist for the Science, Technology and Business Division from Oct. 2001- Dec. 2015. Along with her reference duties for the Library’s Science Reference Service, she created Everyday Mysteries an online collection of fun and scientifically interesting questions and answers about everyday phenomena. Jennifer is the author of the Saving Science Blogs which provides additional information about the collection.”

MakeUseOf: Science Made Simple! 5 Sites and Apps That Explain Complex Topics

MakeUseOf: Science Made Simple! 5 Sites and Apps That Explain Complex Topics. “Science is fascinating, but also often confusing. It can also get a bit embarrassing to ask someone about basic scientific facts or ideas that we assume every other adult knows. So here are a few sites and apps that explain science in simple terms that anyone can understand.” Nice little roundup.