Phys .org: New website evaluates the effectiveness of science communication activities

Phys .org: New website evaluates the effectiveness of science communication activities. “Scientists regularly appear in the media. They participate in science cafés, write a popular-science book or visit school classes. In that way, they want to convey their knowledge and enthusiasm to society. But do they succeed? To answer that question, a new website is launched, with a toolbox full of instruments to evaluate the effect of science communication activities.” This resource is in Research & Opinion instead of New Resources because it is currently only available in Dutch. An English version is planned.

Phys .org: New database of 660,000 assembled bacterial genomes sheds light on the evolution of bacteria

Phys .org: New database of 660,000 assembled bacterial genomes sheds light on the evolution of bacteria. “In a new study, from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), researchers standardized all bacterial genome data held in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) before 2019, creating a searchable and accessible database of genomic assemblies. In the research, published on 9 November 2021 in PLOS Biology, researchers reviewed all of the bacterial data available as of November 2018 and assembled it into over 660,000 genomes.”

World Economic Forum: COVID-19 has damaged public trust in science. Here’s how to repair it

World Economic Forum: COVID-19 has damaged public trust in science. Here’s how to repair it. “Traditionally, new scientific findings were published in academic journals, which are not aimed at the general public, and were not accessible to non-scientists. During the pandemic, however, new findings were seized on immediately by politicians, the media and social media. While this undoubtedly made them more accessible than ever before, it also meant that they were often miscommunicated, with messages and data simplified or warped to fit political or media agendas. This so-called ‘infodemic’ has eroded the credibility and funding of scientific research, and had a negative impact on the already vulnerable careers of early career researchers. What went wrong?”

PR Newswire: Lost Women of Science Launches Podcast Series to Promote the Remarkable Women of Science You’ve Never Heard Of (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Lost Women of Science Launches Podcast Series to Promote the Remarkable Women of Science You’ve Never Heard Of (PRESS RELEASE). “Journalist and author Katie Hafner, and bioethicist Amy Scharf, today announced the launch of the Lost Women of Science podcast series on November 4th, in partnership with public media organization PRX and the award-winning Scientific American magazine. The first season will include four in-depth episodes centered on Dr. Dorothy Andersen (1901-1963), a pediatric pathologist who identified and named cystic fibrosis in 1938. It will be available free on-demand across all major podcast listening platforms, including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Amazon Music.”

New Orleans City Business: Louisiana’s new website for the life sciences industry

New Orleans City Business: Louisiana’s new website for the life sciences industry. “[The site] features an interactive resource guide with information about dozens of established life sciences entities that range from startups and incubators in New Orleans, Thibodaux and Lafayette to established research institutions in Baton Rouge, Shreveport and Covington, a news release said.”

University of Toronto: From colour-changing lizards to ‘buff’ birds, U of T students create fun, science-focused trading cards

University of Toronto: From colour-changing lizards to ‘buff’ birds, U of T students create fun, science-focused trading cards . “Inspired by the Pokémon collectible trading cards of their childhood, University of Toronto biomedical communications students Shehryar (Shay) Saharan and Michie (Xingyu) Wu developed the BMC SciCard Collaborative project.”

Boing Boing: Survey finds 22% of scientists who do media interviews about COVID get violent threats

Boing Boing: Survey finds 22% of scientists who do media interviews about COVID get violent threats. “Nature surveyed 300 scientists who’ve done media interviews about COVID. The results had some surprisingly positive notes — 85% said ‘their experiences of engaging with the media were always or mostly positive, even if they were harassed afterwards’. But as you might expect, a significant chunk described some ghastly abuse. Fully 15% got death threats, and 22% “received threats of physical or sexual violence.”

Nevada Today: Key parts of the James Edward Church Papers Digitized

Nevada Today: Key parts of the James Edward Church Papers Digitized. “Dr. Church was integral to the development of modern snow science through his development of the Mt. Rose snow sampler. At the University Libraries we hold Dr. Church’s papers, including the records he generated during his groundbreaking snow studies. Up until now, these materials have been available for viewing onsite. This project expands the reach of his work, exposes the longitudinal data sources held in the archives, and presents his records and journals for renewed study and worldwide access.”

Motherboard: Archivists Create a Searchable Index of 107 Million Science Articles

Motherboard: Archivists Create a Searchable Index of 107 Million Science Articles. “The General Index is here to serve as your map to human knowledge. Pulled from 107,233,728 journal articles, The General Index is a searchable collection of keywords and short sentences from published papers that can serve as a map to the paywalled domains of scientific knowledge. In full, The General Index is a massive 38 terabyte archive of searchable terms. Compressed, it comes to 8.5 terabytes.”

PR Newswire: CDD Gives Back with Open Access Data Visualization Tool

PR Newswire: CDD Gives Back with Open Access Data Visualization Tool (PRESS RELEASE). “Collaborative Drug Discovery, Inc. (CDD) announced today that it is providing a full featured, standalone software tool to the scientific community for free. CDD Visualization is an intuitive browser-based application that allows scientists to visualize their data and generate publication-ready graphs and plots.”

MEDIA ADVISORY: Physics Digital Images Available for Free from AIP Niels Bohr Library & Archives (American Institute of Physics)

American Institute of Physics: MEDIA ADVISORY: Physics Digital Images Available for Free from AIP Niels Bohr Library & Archives. “Trying to find the right image for a scientific story can be daunting. The American Institute of Physics’ Niels Bohr Library & Archives is making it easier to locate that visual impact for a news piece. More than 28,000 digital images from the Emilio Segrè Visual Archives are available for free to anyone who is searching for historic images of labs and researchers, headshots, and candid photos of physical scientists with their co-workers, families, and friends. The new, searchable location of the photos also houses manuscripts, publications, audiovisual materials, and more from the Niels Bohr Library & Archives.”

Wired: Humans Can’t Be the Sole Keepers of Scientific Knowledge

Wired: Humans Can’t Be the Sole Keepers of Scientific Knowledge. “Writing scientific knowledge in a programming-like language will be dry, but it will be sustainable, because new concepts will be directly added to the library of science that machines understand. Plus, as machines are taught more scientific facts, they will be able to help scientists streamline their logical arguments; spot errors, inconsistencies, plagiarism, and duplications; and highlight connections. AI with an understanding of physical laws is more powerful than AI trained on data alone, so science-savvy machines will be able to help future discoveries. Machines with a great knowledge of science could assist rather than replace human scientists.” I have so many conflicting thoughts about this article that I gave myself a headache. Be warned.

Asahi Shimbun: Social media a boon to finding new animal, plant species

Asahi Shimbun: Social media a boon to finding new animal, plant species. “Satoshi Shimano, a professor of biological taxonomy at Tokyo’s Hosei University, announced the discovery of a new mite species, Choshi hamabe dani, in March. As its scientific name, Ameronothrus twitter, suggests, the arachnid’s existence might not have come to light had it not been for a photo that an amateur photographer posted on Twitter in May 2019. Takamasa Nemoto, a company employee, often snaps photos of mites. But he was unfamiliar with ones he found near a port while out on a fishing trip with his family. His tweet, with the photo of a mite cluster, found its way to Shimano by chance.”

US Department of Energy: DOE invests $13.7 million for research in data reduction for science

US Department of Energy: DOE invests $13.7 million for research in data reduction for science. “Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $13.7 million in funding for nine research projects that will advance the state of the art in computer science and applied mathematics. The projects – led by five universities and five DOE National Laboratories across eight states – will address the challenges of moving, storing, and processing the massive data sets produced by scientific observatories, experimental facilities, and supercomputers, accelerating the pace of scientific discoveries.”

EurekAlert: Science Journals’ new site enlivens communication of leading research and elevates scientist voices

EurekAlert: Science Journals’ new site enlivens communication of leading research and elevates scientist voices. “Following a top-to-bottom redesign, content published on the Science journals website is more integrated, discoverable, and visually engaging than ever before. In late August, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the publisher of the Science family of journals, moved its full suite of online offerings to Atypon’s online publishing platform, Literatum.”