Combating image misuse in science: new Humboldt database provides “missing link” (Elsevier)

Elsevier: Combating image misuse in science: new Humboldt database provides “missing link”. “How do researchers use and change images to make their results look more consistent or convincing? What is considered ‘appropriate’ image manipulation, and when does a scientist cross the line? These are some of the questions I’ve been trying to answer since I started writing my PhD thesis on scholarly image manipulation back in 2013. Inappropriate image manipulation is not good for the ecosystem of science. Science builds on science, and if there’s something wrong with a published paper, then you are poisoning that well.” This is a much deeper dive than a simple new resource announcement.

GeekWire: Chan Zuckerberg Biohub launches open-access database of mouse cells to fuel research

GeekWire: Chan Zuckerberg Biohub launches open-access database of mouse cells to fuel research. “Today the Biohub is launching Tabula Muris, an open-source database that details the biology of the average healthy mouse cell-by-cell, providing a potential gold mine for medical researchers. The database was developed in collaboration with Stanford University and the University of California at San Francisco.”

EurekAlert: Scientists take to Twitter to study flying ants, starling murmurations and house spiders

EurekAlert: Scientists take to Twitter to study flying ants, starling murmurations and house spiders . “Searching tweets for text or hashtags allowed researchers to gather information on popular ecological phenomena observed in the UK such as the emergence of flying ants and starling murmurations. Their findings are published today in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.”

NIH: NIH makes STRIDES to accelerate discoveries in the cloud

NIH: NIH makes STRIDES to accelerate discoveries in the cloud. “The National Institutes of Health has launched a new initiative to harness the power of commercial cloud computing and provide NIH biomedical researchers access to the most advanced, cost-effective computational infrastructure, tools and services available. The STRIDES (Science and Technology Research Infrastructure for Discovery, Experimentation, and Sustainability) Initiative launches with Google Cloud as its first industry partner and aims to reduce economic and technological barriers to accessing and computing on large biomedical data sets to accelerate biomedical advances.”

The Official PLOS Blog: PLOS Update

The Official PLOS Blog: PLOS Update. “In 2009, we launched PLOS Currents as an experimental platform for rapid communication of non-standard publications. A few communities embraced the experiment enthusiastically from the start, and the contributions of researchers who volunteered as editors and reviewers was fantastic. Over the years, we have seen important applications, for example, in small communities collaborating on rare diseases research in PLOS Currents Huntington Disease, and in rapid communication of preliminary results in the context of disease outbreaks in PLOS Currents Outbreaks. In particular, there was a surge of submissions during the 2014 Ebola outbreak and the 2015-2016 Zika virus outbreak. However, in recent years the technology supporting this platform has aged rapidly, the user experience has been subpar, and submissions have substantially decreased.”

Scientific American: The Truth Sometimes Hurts

Scientific American: The Truth Sometimes Hurts. “I have a confession: I have no idea what I’m doing. I believe that publicly funded scientists owe the public an explanation of their research and why it matters. I also have a belief, informed by years of research, that climate change is frightening and requires immediate action. Science communication is more important now than ever. I’m afraid I don’t know how to do it.”

University of California San Francisco: New Tool Crowdsources Human Intelligence for Biological Research

University of California San Francisco: New Tool Crowdsources Human Intelligence for Biological Research. “Biologists are drowning in a sea of cellular photoshoots, and because they’re so drenched in such data, their experiments proceed less efficiently. Nothing gums up the scientific process like having 10,000 images to label. To address this problem, a team led by researchers at UC San Francisco, the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, and IBM have launched Quanti.us – a user-friendly website designed to recruit thousands of fresh eyes to look over scientific images. A paper describing the tool was published July 31 in Nature Methods.”