Boing Boing: A web tool that converts PDF scientific papers into HTML

Boing Boing: A web tool that converts PDF scientific papers into HTML. “The folks at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence just released an intriguing tool — ‘Paper to HTML’, which lets you upload a scientific paper and it turns it into an HTML web page. The goal, as they wrote in their email, is to improve accessibility: Screen-readers and accessibility tech usually finds it a lot easier to parse HTML than PDFs.” Ooo!

Ohio State News: Groundbreaking ideas from women scientists get less attention

Ohio State News: Groundbreaking ideas from women scientists get less attention. “Researchers used a novel way of tracing the flow of ideas to find that even some of the most well-known breakthroughs in biomedical research from 1980 to 2008 had a more difficult road to adoption when research teams were dominated by women. Specifically, the five-year adoption rate of new ideas from female-majority teams was 23% lower than that of male-majority teams – even among the top 0.1% of ideas.”

Times Higher Education: The push for open access is making science less inclusive

Times Higher Education: The push for open access is making science less inclusive. “To avoid publishing becoming economically prohibitive, the push for open access above all other publication priorities must be substituted by a push for true inclusiveness. Required measures include, at the minimum, the extension of full waivers to lower-middle-income countries and the extension of substantial automatic discounts to upper-middle-income countries such as ours. The scientific community must also ensure fair practice and pricing in academic publishing. Consortia of national funding agencies could collect and analyse publishers’ budgets, comparing them with estimated publishing costs and deciding on a maximum fair price that they are prepared to pay.”

The Conversation: Excel autocorrect errors still plague genetic research, raising concerns over scientific rigour

The Conversation: Excel autocorrect errors still plague genetic research, raising concerns over scientific rigour. “Autocorrection, or predictive text, is a common feature of many modern tech tools, from internet searches to messaging apps and word processors. Autocorrection can be a blessing, but when the algorithm makes mistakes it can change the message in dramatic and sometimes hilarious ways. Our research shows autocorrect errors, particularly in Excel spreadsheets, can also make a mess of gene names in genetic research.”

BuzzFeed News: A Big Study About Honesty Turns Out To Be Based On Fake Data

BuzzFeed News: A Big Study About Honesty Turns Out To Be Based On Fake Data. “A landmark study that endorsed a simple way to curb cheating is going to be retracted nearly a decade later after a group of scientists found that it relied on faked data. According to the 2012 paper, when people signed an honesty declaration at the beginning of a form, rather than the end, they were less likely to lie.”

Techdirt: Juul Rented A Scientific Journal For a Month To Spread Glorified Marketing

Techdirt: Juul Rented A Scientific Journal For a Month To Spread Glorified Marketing. “Juul is sparing no expense to try and convince the FDA to keep its products on store shelves. Buried in a New York Times report on the looming FDA decision was an interesting nugget: namely that the company had paid $51,000 for a month of favorable coverage in the American Journal of Health Behavior.”

DND: National Digital Archive of Pakistani journals will be established at PASTIC

DND: National Digital Archive of Pakistani journals will be established at PASTIC. “The Pakistan Scientific and Technological Information Centre (PASTIC) is a premier organization in the Country established for the Dissemination of Scientific & Technological Information for catering to the information needs of scientists, researchers, academicians, industrialists, entrepreneurs, planners, policymakers, etc. The official launching ceremony of the PASTIC’s PSDP-funded project titled ‘National Digital Archive of research published in Pakistani journals’ was held on June 24, 2021 at Islamabad Hotel in Islamabad.”

Internet Archive Blog: Search Scholarly Materials Preserved in the Internet Archive

Internet Archive Blog: Search Scholarly Materials Preserved in the Internet Archive. “IA Scholar is a simple, access-oriented interface to content identified across several Internet Archive collections, including web archives, archive.org files, and digitized print materials. The full text of articles is searchable for users that are hunting for particular phrases or keywords. This complements our existing full-text search index of millions of digitized books and other documents on archive.org. The service builds on Fatcat, an open catalog we have developed to identify at-risk and web-published open scholarly outputs that can benefit from long-term preservation, additional metadata, and perpetual access.”

PLOS Blogs-ECR Community: Three reasons to use social media for scientific self-promotion

PLOS Blogs-ECR Community: Three reasons to use social media for scientific self-promotion. “Over a decade ago when a scientist published a new paper the only people who would read it were your colleagues in the field, undergraduates writing a literature review and the family you proudly emailed it to. Now, social media lets us share our publications and achievements to even more people. We also have the opportunity to make connections and start collaborations that might not have happened otherwise. Social media can be an incredible resource for a scientist who wants to spread their work, network and become a member of the scientific community.”

The Conversation: As scientists turn their attention to COVID-19, other research is not getting done – and that can have lasting consequences

The Conversation: As scientists turn their attention to COVID-19, other research is not getting done – and that can have lasting consequences. “When a new virus is ravaging the planet, scientists should help. This is an all-hands-on-deck emergency, and researchers with different backgrounds can bring new perspectives that can lead to major breakthroughs. Yet there is some evidence that as labs have shifted attention to SARS-CoV-2, efforts have been duplicated, and precious time and resources have been used ineffectively. This rapid scientific reorientation has implications far beyond SARS-COV-2 and potentially leaves the world vulnerable to other health crises.”

Springer Link: How Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology deals with fraudulent papers from paper mills

Springer Link: How Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology deals with fraudulent papers from paper mills. “Fraudulent papers from paper mills are a serious threat to the entire scientific community. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology has become the target of a massive attack of fraudulent papers originating from paper mills. This editorial highlights 20 important features we observed with paper mills and explains how the journal is responding to this serious threat to restore the integrity of science. Hopefully, this editorial is also helpful for editors of other scientific journals.”

Phys .org: Pandemic spawns ‘infodemic’ in scientific literature

Phys .org: Pandemic spawns ‘infodemic’ in scientific literature. “The science community has responded to the COVID-19 pandemic with such a flurry of research studies that it is hard for anyone to digest them all, underscoring a long-standing need to make scientific publication more accessible, transparent and accountable, two artificial intelligence experts assert in a data science journal.”