JSTOR Daily: An Epidemic of Retractions

JSTOR Daily: An Epidemic of Retractions. “Nicolas Chevassus-au-Louis’s new book, Fraud in the Lab: The High Stakes of Scientific Research (translated by Nicholas Elliott) tackles the issue of scientific fraud head-on, with some tough love for the scientific community. The book should be read by everyone interested in the sciences. Chevassus-au-Louis offers a welcome reminder that scientists are human, too, subject to the temptations of ambition, to career pressures, and to plain old greed.”

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment: Quantifying the contribution of citizen science to broad‐scale ecological databases

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment: Quantifying the contribution of citizen science to broad‐scale ecological databases. “Ecological research increasingly relies on broad‐scale databases containing information collected by personnel from a variety of sources, including government agencies, universities, and citizen‐science programs. However, the contribution of citizen‐science programs to these databases is not well known. We analyzed one such database to quantify the contribution of citizen science to lake water‐quality data from seven US states.”

EurekAlert: New database enhances genomics research collaboration

EurekAlert: New database enhances genomics research collaboration. “The MaveDB database is a repository for data from experiments – called multiplex assays of variant effect (MAVEs) – that systematically measure the impact of thousands of individual sequence variants on a gene’s function. These experiments can provide valuable information about how proteins produced by that gene function, how variants in that gene may contribute to disease, and how to engineer synthetic versions of naturally occurring proteins that are more effective than the original protein.”

Computing: Kew Gardens plans to digitise and release Darwin’s data

Computing: Kew Gardens plans to digitise and release Darwin’s data . “Kew Gardens is planning to implement an integrated collections management system to unify its disparate databases and make their data available to the world. Whilst most think of the sculpted gardens when they think of Kew, and as a plot of land which is home to over 30,000 trees that’s unsurprising, most are unaware that it’s also a centre of scientific research, and home to the world’s most extensive botanic collections.”

Phys .org: Deaths of prominent life scientists tend to be followed by a surge in highly cited research by newcomers

Phys .org: Deaths of prominent life scientists tend to be followed by a surge in highly cited research by newcomers. “…when star scientists die, their subfields see a subsequent 8.6 percent increase, on average, of articles by researchers who have not previously collaborated with those star scientists. Moreover, those papers published by the newcomers to these fields are much more likely to be influential and highly cited than other pieces of research.”

PBS News Hour: Smartphones aren’t making millennials grow horns. Here’s how to spot a bad study

PBS News Hour: Smartphones aren’t making millennials grow horns. Here’s how to spot a bad study. “The original study and both news stories — which have gone viral, picked up by dozens more outlets in recent days — link these alleged bone deformities to the use of mobile technology, specifically because users are bending ‘their heads forward to make sense of what’s happening on the miniature screens,’ as the [Washington] Post wrote. There’s one problem.”