Pew: The Science People See on Social Media

Pew (pew pew pew pew pew!): The Science People See on Social Media. “Millions of people see science-related information on their Facebook feeds or elsewhere on social media, but the kinds of science stories people most likely encounter are often practical tips with ‘news you can use’ or promotions for programs and events rather than new developments in the science, engineering and technology world.”

Phys .org: Add-on clip turns smartphone into fully operational microscope

Phys. org: Add-on clip turns smartphone into fully operational microscope . “Australian researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) have developed a 3D printable ‘clip-on’ that can turn any smartphone into a fully functional microscope. Reported in the research journal Scientific Reports, the smartphone microscope is powerful enough to visualise specimens as small as 1/200th of a millimetre, including microscopic organisms, animal and plant cells, blood cells, cell nuclei and more. ” The team has made the files for printing the clip-on freely available.

National Institutes of Health: NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development

National Institutes of Health: NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development. “The National Institutes of Health Tuesday released to the scientific community an unparalleled dataset from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. To date, more than 7,500 youth and their families have been recruited for the study, well over half the participant goal. Approximately 30 terabytes of data (about three times the size of the Library of Congress collection), obtained from the first 4,500 participants, will be available to scientists worldwide to conduct research on the many factors that influence brain, cognitive, social, and emotional development.”

The Scientist: Biohacker Injects DIY Herpes Vaccine on Facebook Live

The Scientist: Biohacker Injects DIY Herpes Vaccine on Facebook Live. “‘I do not do intermuscular injections into any muscles but my thighs . . . so I’ll be taking off my pants,’ announced self-described citizen scientist Aaron Traywick 20 minutes into the half-hour broadcast whose denouement would be his self-injection with a purported vaccine against the herpes virus.”

Boston Globe: Chan Zuckerberg philanthropy taps UMass Amherst to create AI scientific research tool

Boston Globe: Chan Zuckerberg philanthropy taps UMass Amherst to create AI scientific research tool. “A philanthropy started by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan has awarded a $5.5 million grant to the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s Center for Data Science to create a free tool that would make millions of published scientific and medical findings easily accessible to researchers worldwide. The project, called Computable Knowledge, would use a branch of artificial intelligence known as knowledge representation and reasoning to create a navigable map of scientific findings from millions of new and historical research articles. The project aims to help scientists stay current on new research and to make it easier to find previously unknown connections between findings in genetics, diseases, drugs, and treatments.”

MIT Technology Review: China Publishes More Scientific Articles Than the U.S.

MIT Technology Review: China Publishes More Scientific Articles Than the U.S.. “According to the National Science Foundation, China published over 426,000 research papers in 2016. America pumped out almost 409,000. If you consider the number of citations for those papers, a measure of the influence they have in the scientific community, America does better—it placed third internationally, while China comes in fifth (Sweden and Switzerland took the top spots).”

Nature: Science search engine links papers to grants and patents

Nature: Science search engine links papers to grants and patents. “The marketplace for science search engines is competitive and crowded. But a database launched on 15 January aims to provide academics with new ways to analyse the scholarly literature — including the grant funding behind it. Dimensions not only indexes papers and their citations, but also — uniquely among scholarly databases — connects publications to their related grants, funding agencies, patents and clinical trials. The tool ‘should give researchers more power to look at their fields and follow the money’, says James Wilsdon, a research-policy specialist at the University of Sheffield, UK.”