Internet Archive Blog: Search Scholarly Materials Preserved in the Internet Archive

Internet Archive Blog: Search Scholarly Materials Preserved in the Internet Archive. “IA Scholar is a simple, access-oriented interface to content identified across several Internet Archive collections, including web archives, archive.org files, and digitized print materials. The full text of articles is searchable for users that are hunting for particular phrases or keywords. This complements our existing full-text search index of millions of digitized books and other documents on archive.org. The service builds on Fatcat, an open catalog we have developed to identify at-risk and web-published open scholarly outputs that can benefit from long-term preservation, additional metadata, and perpetual access.”

PLOS Blogs-ECR Community: Three reasons to use social media for scientific self-promotion

PLOS Blogs-ECR Community: Three reasons to use social media for scientific self-promotion. “Over a decade ago when a scientist published a new paper the only people who would read it were your colleagues in the field, undergraduates writing a literature review and the family you proudly emailed it to. Now, social media lets us share our publications and achievements to even more people. We also have the opportunity to make connections and start collaborations that might not have happened otherwise. Social media can be an incredible resource for a scientist who wants to spread their work, network and become a member of the scientific community.”

The Conversation: As scientists turn their attention to COVID-19, other research is not getting done – and that can have lasting consequences

The Conversation: As scientists turn their attention to COVID-19, other research is not getting done – and that can have lasting consequences. “When a new virus is ravaging the planet, scientists should help. This is an all-hands-on-deck emergency, and researchers with different backgrounds can bring new perspectives that can lead to major breakthroughs. Yet there is some evidence that as labs have shifted attention to SARS-CoV-2, efforts have been duplicated, and precious time and resources have been used ineffectively. This rapid scientific reorientation has implications far beyond SARS-COV-2 and potentially leaves the world vulnerable to other health crises.”

Springer Link: How Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology deals with fraudulent papers from paper mills

Springer Link: How Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology deals with fraudulent papers from paper mills. “Fraudulent papers from paper mills are a serious threat to the entire scientific community. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology has become the target of a massive attack of fraudulent papers originating from paper mills. This editorial highlights 20 important features we observed with paper mills and explains how the journal is responding to this serious threat to restore the integrity of science. Hopefully, this editorial is also helpful for editors of other scientific journals.”

Phys .org: Pandemic spawns ‘infodemic’ in scientific literature

Phys .org: Pandemic spawns ‘infodemic’ in scientific literature. “The science community has responded to the COVID-19 pandemic with such a flurry of research studies that it is hard for anyone to digest them all, underscoring a long-standing need to make scientific publication more accessible, transparent and accountable, two artificial intelligence experts assert in a data science journal.”

Phys .org: High time to open up ecological research

Phys .org: High time to open up ecological research. “Share the code and data behind the research please. It’s easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science. That is the clear message from a new paper in PLOS Biology. An international team of ecologists found that currently, only about a quarter of the scientific papers in their field publicly shares computer code for analyses. ‘To make the science of ecology more transparent and reproducible, sharing is urgently needed.’”

Phys .org: An open-source data platform for researchers studying archaea

Phys .org: An open-source data platform for researchers studying archaea. “To foster scientific exchange and to advance discovery, biologists in the School of Arts & Sciences led by postdoc Stefan Schulze and professor Mecky Pohlschroder have launched the Archaeal Proteome Project (ArcPP), a web-based database to collect and make available datasets to further the work of all scientists interested in archaea, a domain of life composed of microorganisms that can dwell anywhere from deep-sea vents to the human gut.”

Weaving Indigenous knowledge with scientific research: A balanced approach (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Weaving Indigenous knowledge with scientific research: A balanced approach. “Indigenous knowledge, including oral histories, mythologies, place names and classification schemes, can span many generations, preserving information that has helped native communities adapt to natural hazards as well as gradually changing conditions. Although Western scientists have historically deemed such information unreliable, during the past decade there has been increasing recognition of the advantages of bicultural approaches to scientific research, including demonstration of reliability.”

Salesforce: Salesforce Research Develops New Search Engine to Support the Fight Against COVID-19

Salesforce: Salesforce Research Develops New Search Engine to Support the Fight Against COVID-19. “Searching scientific publications requires different techniques from traditional keyword-matching search engines. It’s critical that a COVID-19 search engine interpret the proper meaning in a given search, going beyond finding results based on the frequency with which words appear in documents. And with long documents, it’s valuable to quickly surface relevant passages in search results. COVID-19 Search addresses this by combining text retrieval and NLP — including semantic search, state of the art question answering, and abstractive summarization — to better understand the question and surface the most relevant scientific results.”

CNBC: Why the buzz around DeepMind is dissipating as it transitions from games to science

CNBC: Why the buzz around DeepMind is dissipating as it transitions from games to science. “DeepMind’s army of 1,000 plus people, which includes hundreds of highly-paid PhD graduates, continues to pump out academic paper after academic paper, but only a smattering of the work gets picked up by the mainstream media. The research lab has churned out over 1,000 papers and 13 of them have been published by Nature or Science, which are widely seen as the world’s most prestigious academic journals.”

Emory University: Rollins Launches CoCites, a Radical New Scientific Search Tool

Emory University: Rollins Launches CoCites, a Radical New Scientific Search Tool. “Searching scientific literature is inefficient and ineffective. A complete search on a topic requires an extensive query that combines all relevant keywords and their synonyms. A simple search retrieves only part of the relevant literature depending on the keywords that are searched. With CoCites, users don’t enter keywords, they enter or select the title of the article for which they would like to find related content. The tool retrieves these other articles through co-citations. Articles that are frequently cited together with the selected paper appear at the top of the search results.”

EurekAlert: Microbiome search engine can increase efficiency in disease detection and diagnosis

EurekAlert: Microbiome search engine can increase efficiency in disease detection and diagnosis. “Big data makes big promises when it comes to providing insights into human behavior and health. The problem is how to harness the information it provides in an efficient manner. An international team of researchers has proposed a microbiome search-based method, via Microbiome Search Engine (MSE), to analyze the wealth of available health data to detect and diagnose human diseases.”

University World News: Hunt for coronavirus cure is making science more open

University World News: Hunt for coronavirus cure is making science more open. “…while cities are locked down and borders are closed in response to the coronavirus outbreak, science is becoming more open. This openness is already making a difference to scientists’ response to the virus and has the potential to change the world. But it’s not as simple as making every research finding available to anyone for any purpose. Without care and responsibility, there is a danger that open science can be misused or contribute to the spread of misinformation.”