Trusted Sources of Information about COVID-19: What We’re Watching and Following (Union of Concerned Scientists)

Union of Concerned Scientists: Trusted Sources of Information about COVID-19: What We’re Watching and Following. “Are you, too, looking for reliable and trustworthy information about COVID-19 and the pandemic? Here at the Union of Concerned Scientists, we’ve assembled a team of scientists, researchers, and public health and communications experts from across the organization who have been tracking and responding to the ongoing public health crisis since February, especially when we see political interference in science-based decision making.”

University of Washington: Who’s tweeting about scientific research? And why?

University of Washington: Who’s tweeting about scientific research? And why?. “Scientists candidly tweet about their unpublished research not only to one another but also to a broader audience of engaged laypeople. When consumers of cutting-edge science tweet or retweet about studies they find interesting, they leave behind a real-time record of the impact that taxpayer-funded research is having within academia and beyond.”

Scientific American: A Grassroots Effort to Fight Misinformation During the Pandemic

Scientific American: A Grassroots Effort to Fight Misinformation During the Pandemic. “During the height of the deadly COVID-19 pandemic, with misinformation permeating every form of media, members of the public were growing increasingly concerned for their health and seeking answers about the virus, its mode of transmission and how to protect themselves and their loved ones. Five organizations came together, recruited hundreds of volunteer scientists and built a new tool to get the best scientific information in plain language to millions of people around the world. This is the story of that project.”

Phys .org: Researchers trace the outlines of two cultures within science

Phys .org: Researchers trace the outlines of two cultures within science. “In the world of scientific research today, there’s a revolution going on—over the last decade or so, scientists across many disciplines have been seeking to improve the workings of science and its methods. To do this, scientists are largely following one of two paths: the movement for reproducibility and the movement for open science. Both movements aim to create centralized archives for data, computer code and other resources, but from there, the paths diverge.”

Phys .org: Antarctica is still free of COVID-19. Can it stay that way?

Phys .org: Antarctica is still free of COVID-19. Can it stay that way?. “At this very moment a vast world exists that’s free of the coronavirus, where people can mingle without masks and watch the pandemic unfold from thousands of miles away. That world is Antarctica, the only continent without COVID-19. Now, as nearly 1,000 scientists and others who wintered over on the ice are seeing the sun for the first time in weeks or months, a global effort wants to make sure incoming colleagues don’t bring the virus with them.”

BuzzFeed News: The FBI Is Warning Scientists To Watch Out For “Suspicious” Packages

BuzzFeed News: The FBI Is Warning Scientists To Watch Out For “Suspicious” Packages. “Hundreds of researchers at the University of Washington have been warned to watch out for suspicious mail after the FBI informed the school that a suspicious package was sent to coronavirus scientists elsewhere.”

Arizona State University: General public sees government science advisers through political lens, ASU researcher finds

Arizona State University: General public sees government science advisers through political lens, ASU researcher finds. “What people think of the scientists who advise the federal government partially depends on their own political persuasion and where the scientists work, according to new findings published this week by an Arizona State University researcher. The study highlights the risk of politicizing scientific advice given to government agencies.”

The Verge: How the world’s biggest general science society is tackling racism

The Verge: How the world’s biggest general science society is tackling racism. “The world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific society has decided to take on systemic racism. The move by The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), publisher of the esteemed Science journals, comes after Black scientists came forward to protest racism within academia and the sciences, and organized a strike on June 10th, that AAAS joined. In a letter to its 120,000 members this month, AAAS CEO Sudip Parikh announced that the 172-year-old institution has come up with a plan to hold itself accountable for making itself and the sciences more diverse.”

Marie Claire: Lyda Hill Philanthropies Launches the IF/THEN Collection to Educate About Women In STEM

Marie Claire: Lyda Hill Philanthropies Launches the IF/THEN Collection to Educate About Women In STEM. “The online resource features photos and videos of more than 125 female STEM change-makers selected by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Lyda Hill Philanthropies to be IF/THEN ambassadors. The diverse group of women, who represent a range of backgrounds, will serve as role models for young women interested in the sciences and technology.”

MobiHealthNews: Doctors tweet swimsuit photos in rebuke of critical journal article

MobiHealthNews: Doctors tweet swimsuit photos in rebuke of critical journal article. “A new twitter movement dubbed #MedBikini has emerged after a research article published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery concluded that half of the recent and soon-to-be graduates in vascular surgery has social media accounts with ‘unprofessional content.'”

Digital Trends: Need online lessons for your kid? This site lets them Skype with a scientist

Digital Trends: Need online lessons for your kid? This site lets them Skype with a scientist. “Interested in ichthyology or curious about crustaceans? Skype a Scientist lets you bring experts into your home (virtually) to answer all your questions — for free. Dr. Sarah McAnulty is a squid biologist and executive director of Skype a Scientist. She started the program in 2017 as a way to connect classrooms with scientists, but with everyone now at home due to the coronavirus, it’s been expanded to allow families to chat with experts as well.”

ABC News: ‘Calling all scientists’: Experts volunteer for virus fight

ABC News: ‘Calling all scientists’: Experts volunteer for virus fight. “Michael Wells was looking for a chance to use his scientific training to help fight the coronavirus when — on the same day the pandemic forced his lab to temporarily close — he decided to create his own opportunity. ‘CALLING ALL SCIENTISTS,’ he tweeted on March 18. ‘Help me in creating a national database of researchers willing and able to aid in local COVID-19 efforts. This info will be a resource for institutions/(government) agencies upon their request.’ That’s how the 34-year-old neuroscientist at the Broad Institute and Harvard University launched a national effort to marshal scientists to volunteer in the fight against the virus.”

Superior pinpoints racism in science: Naive scientists plus strategic racists (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Superior pinpoints racism in science: Naive scientists plus strategic racists. “Science has had issues with racism from its very beginning. At best, many of the early scientists had ideas that typified the racist societies of their times. At worst, they actively participated in providing justification for that racism, a habit that reached its peak in the eugenics movement of the first half of last century. But World War II made the end point of eugenics painfully obvious, causing mainstream science to re-evaluate and reject many of its racist ideas. But as racists have become increasingly public in the early years of this century, they’ve once again turned to science for support—and found some scientists ready to provide it. How in the world did this happen?”

Caltech: Virtual Reality for Scientists

Caltech: Virtual Reality for Scientists . “When you think of virtual reality, or VR, you might conjure up images of action-packed video games or immersive tours of deep ocean waters and other exotic locale. But, in recent years, scientists have started to don VR goggles too—not for entertainment, but for analyzing and comprehending their data. At Caltech, efforts to design VR tools for the future are underway, with prototypes in development for studying everything from worms to ocean waters to biomolecules and more.”