The Herald: Glasgow history project unveils digital maps to city’s past

The Herald: Glasgow history project unveils digital maps to city’s past. “Ghost Signs of Glasgow is a volunteer-based project started by the Glasgow Heritage Trust which provides guided tours around the city to discover its past. While lockdown has halted all in-person tours, the group have released digital maps for people to explore Glasgow’s history through fast-disappearing signs across the city.”

The Scotsman: Unlocking the treasures that tell the story of the Highlands

The Scotsman: Unlocking the treasures that tell the story of the Highlands. “Highland Objects has been launched to open up the collections of the small independent museums in the Highlands, which are now facing a very uncertain future given the impact of the pandemic and the loss of vistitors from around the world this year. Running online, museums in the Highlands have been asked to put forward their favourite objects with the public to vote on their most loved out of a group of six.

The Scotsman: Map of Scots women accused of witchcraft published for first time

The Scotsman: Map of Scots women accused of witchcraft published for first time. “A map that tracks more than 3,000 Scots women who were accused of being witches in the 16th and 17th Century has been published for the first time. The interactive document has been created by data experts at the University of Edinburgh.”

The Courier: Explore Innergourie, Meffen and Scoun on new interactive Scots language map

The Courier: Explore Innergourie, Meffen and Scoun on new interactive Scots language map. “After two years of sifting through old documents, poems and audio recordings, the Scots Language Centre (SLC) unveiled its first digital map of Scotland at a ceremony in Perth. All place names are written in Scots, showing how the mother tongue has changed over the centuries.”

The Scotsman: Retired police sergeant shows off eccentric brick collection

New-to-me and I LOATHE this headline. He’s collecting bricks and not hurting anybody. (This may just be an American thing; “eccentric” here can be very pejorative.) The Scotsman: Retired police sergeant shows off eccentric brick collection. “When looking for a doorstop for his garden shed almost ten years ago, retired police sergeant Mark Cranston found a white painted brick from a former colliery in Ayrshire, which inspired him to explore its historical significance. Since then, Mark has amassed a huge amount of bricks from around Scotland, England, Wales and abroad, which he stores in his garden shed in Jedburgh, in the Scottish Borders.” They didn’t link to his Web site! https://www.scottishbrickhistory.co.uk/ .

The National: £200k appeal to put historic Marzaroli photo archive online

The National (Scotland): £200k appeal to put historic Marzaroli photo archive online. “A FUNDRAISER has been launched with the aim of making the entire archive of a celebrated Scottish photographer freely available online. The Oscar Marzaroli images were donated to Glasgow Caledonian University by his family on yesterday, which was the 31st anniversary of his death.”

Daily Record: Personal access to Perth museum collections

Daily Record: Personal access to Perth museum collections. “Members of the public will now have greater access to the region’s museum collections, thanks to a funding boost. Culture Perth and Kinross, the creative organisation behind the region’s museums, has secured a grant of £59,924 from Museums Galleries Scotland to introduce interactive digital engagement. The grant will allow staff to work with experts from the University of Abertay in Dundee to develop new digital collections, including collections of natural history, archaeology and fine art.”

The National: Aberdeen’s suffragette past revealed by new website

The National: Aberdeen’s suffragette past revealed by new website. “GOLF course flag switches, school fire-raising, cinema protest – the hidden history of suffragettes in the north-east of Scotland is revealed in an interactive online project. The digital database of the suffrage movement in Aberdeen and the surrounding area is now live thanks to Professor Sarah Pederson of Robert Gordon University and her team.”

The Northern Scot: Rare agricultural footage goes under the hammer

The Northern Scot: Rare agricultural footage goes under the hammer. “A RARE collection of 22 digitised video clips showing scenes from Scotland’s rural and agricultural heritage is going up for auction in Elgin this week…. Running for 5 hours and 21 minutes, it showcases Clydesdale horse history and their role in agriculture, seed sowing 1940s-style using the fiddle, typical rural school circa 1950s, and the start of the harvest in the 1960s, among many other videos of Scottish rural life.”

BBC: Maps show land confiscated from Old Fox

BBC: Maps show land confiscated from Old Fox. “Maps made to help the government control the confiscated estate of a notorious Jacobite have been made available to the public online. They are among more than 400 maps belonging to the Lovat Estates near Beauly in the Highlands. After the defeat of the Jacobites at Culloden, the British government took control of the estates of the 11th Lord Lovat, Simon Fraser, who was known as the Old Fox.”

Evening Express: New online tool will help families track down Scottish ancestors

Evening Express: New online tool will help families track down Scottish ancestors. “Professor Marjory Harper, a historian from Aberdeen University who has extensively researched the stories of emigrants who set sail for a new life abroad, has helped create a free online tool which contains the records of 21,000 people. The Scottish Emigration Database lists details including the town or village of origin, address, destination and occupation, as well as information about specific vessels and shipping lines.”

BBC: Mary Queen of Scots documents found at Museum of Edinburgh

BBC: Mary Queen of Scots documents found at Museum of Edinburgh. “A group of documents believed to have been signed by Mary Queen of Scots have come to light at the Museum of Edinburgh after decades spent unseen. Files showed they were gifted in 1920 but they had been lost in storage until recent inventory work by curators.”

Digit: Digital Archive Collaboration Will Preserve Edinburgh’s Past

Digit: Digital Archive Collaboration Will Preserve Edinburgh’s Past. “Edinburgh’s Libraries Service is collaborating with the Living Memory Association to preserve Edinburgh’s past through its digital images archive. Edinburgh Collected is an online collection available through library service where people can browse or share photographs and memories of Edinburgh’s past. Users can also upload pictures or save them to an online scrapbook. The online collection will host more than 2,500 pictures provided by the Leith-based association, adding to what is already the most extensive historic photography database in Edinburgh.”

Glasgow Live: Glasgow University makes Gaelic audio archive freely available

Glasgow Live: Glasgow University makes Gaelic audio archive freely available. “Their songs and stories speak of a different time. Living memories passed down from parent to child over generations. Now audio recordings of the traditions of crofters, farm workers and fishermen, in English and Gaelic, along with some Scots, were today (27 August) put online by the University of Glasgow.”