The Ferret: The Brexit Papers

The Ferret, and I’m not sure when these were released: The Brexit Papers. “In September 2018 The Ferret submitted more than 130 freedom of information (FoI) requests to Scottish public bodies to find out what measures they had taken to prepare for Brexit. This has produced more than 350 documents, which we’ve published below in a single, public, searchable archive.”

Carved in stone: recording Scotland’s prehistoric rock art (Current Archaeology)

Current Archaeology: Carved in stone: recording Scotland’s prehistoric rock art. “The ScRAP project aims to record the many examples of prehistoric rock art found across Scotland. As was the case in Kilmartin, there is currently no standardised database and very little contextual information available for the approximately 2,700 examples of rock art so far known in the country. As a community-based initiative, archaeologists on the project are training volunteers across Scotland to record these prehistoric carvings and upload them to the project’s online database. “

Digit: Digital Archive Collaboration Will Preserve Edinburgh’s Past

Digit: Digital Archive Collaboration Will Preserve Edinburgh’s Past. “Edinburgh’s Libraries Service is collaborating with the Living Memory Association to preserve Edinburgh’s past through its digital images archive. Edinburgh Collected is an online collection available through library service where people can browse or share photographs and memories of Edinburgh’s past. Users can also upload pictures or save them to an online scrapbook. The online collection will host more than 2,500 pictures provided by the Leith-based association, adding to what is already the most extensive historic photography database in Edinburgh.”

Glasgow Live: Glasgow University makes Gaelic audio archive freely available

Glasgow Live: Glasgow University makes Gaelic audio archive freely available. “Their songs and stories speak of a different time. Living memories passed down from parent to child over generations. Now audio recordings of the traditions of crofters, farm workers and fishermen, in English and Gaelic, along with some Scots, were today (27 August) put online by the University of Glasgow.”

The Scotsman: The Royal Scots bring history into the present with digital archive

The Scotsman: The Royal Scots bring history into the present with digital archive. “Edinburgh-born James Fleming was only 22 when he was killed in battle in Belgium on October 14, 1918. The son of Archibald and Jane Fleming, of 31 Nelson Street, was a lance corporal in the 11th battalion of The Royal Scots during the Great War. The young soldier is one of 11,313 names memorialised on The Royal Scots digitised Roll of Honour that has been collated in honour of the centenary of the end of the First World War. Colonel Martin Gibson is the commander of the larger digitisation project, of which the roll is the first stage, which will eventually see the whole of The Royal Scots archive online.” I could not find the actual address of the Roll in the article, maybe I missed it. You can find it at http://straylight.cs.st-andrews.ac.uk/royalscots/ .

Live Science: Enigmatic Stone Balls from 5,000 Years Ago Continue to Baffle Archaeologists

Live Science: Enigmatic Stone Balls from 5,000 Years Ago Continue to Baffle Archaeologists. “Archaeologists still don’t know the original purpose or meaning of the Neolithic stone balls, which are recognized as some of the finest examples of Neolithic art found anywhere in the world. But now, they’ve created virtual 3D models of the gorgeous balls, primarily to share with the public. In addition, the models have revealed some new details, including once-hidden patterns in the carvings on the balls.”