Lancaster University: Research explores how WhatsApp and Zoom calls can help young children communicate

Lancaster University: Research explores how WhatsApp and Zoom calls can help young children communicate . “Lancaster University researchers will look at how infants and toddlers learn to communicate using TV streaming, digital books and family Zoom calls in their everyday home lives. Toddlers, Tech and Talk, a ground-breaking project led by researchers from Manchester Metropolitan University, is the most in-depth study to date into how the daily exposure of babies and very young children to digital technologies influences how they speak and interact with others.”

Illinois News Bureau: More physical activity, less screen time linked to better executive function in toddlers, study finds

Illinois News Bureau: More physical activity, less screen time linked to better executive function in toddlers, study finds . “Reported in The Journal of Pediatrics, the study found that 24-month-old children who spent less than 60 minutes looking at screens each day and those who engaged in daily physical activity had better executive function than those who didn’t meet the guidelines.”

Pew: How parents’ views of their kids’ screen time, social media use changed during COVID-19

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): How parents’ views of their kids’ screen time, social media use changed during COVID-19. “In April 2021, the Center followed up with many of the same parents we surveyed in March 2020 to check in on their children’s use of technology and social media during the pandemic. This second survey focused on parents who had a kid age 11 or younger in 2020, and it was fielded at a time when some schools were temporarily reverting to virtual learning and vaccines were not yet approved for children under 12. Below, we take a closer look at what these parents told us about their young child, including how the experiences they reported in 2021 compared with their responses from 2020.”

MakeUseOf: The 6 Best Free Sites for DIY Arts and Crafts

MakeUseOf: The 6 Best Free Sites for DIY Arts and Crafts. “Sometimes, it’s nice to take a little time away from our devices and do something different. But it’s not always easy to find an activity interesting enough to keep us occupied for long enough. Why not give your creative side a chance? Here, we look at six free websites that offer fun and affordable DIY arts and crafts ideas to keep your mind as well as your hands busy.”

Brookings Institution: How to measure and regulate the attention costs of consumer technology

Brookings Institution: How to measure and regulate the attention costs of consumer technology. “Software does not get bored, tired, or overwhelmed, but we do—and when we do, software is often designed to prey on us. Without recognizing and potentially regulating for engagement maximization in technology, we may increasingly lose de facto ownership of our own attention through seemingly minute, but pervasive digital incursions.”

Next Web: My team experimented with ‘no screen mornings’ — it worked wonders

Next Web: My team experimented with ‘no screen mornings’ — it worked wonders. “Want to feel stressed, anxious, and/or completely exhausted before you even have breakfast? I highly recommend looking at your phone right when you wake up. I tend to look at Slack, email, and (*sigh*) Twitter right after I wake up. But sometimes I wonder if my head would be clearer if I just… didn’t. So I tried it out — and asked my coworkers at Zapier to join me.”

Mashable: How a year of living online has changed us

Mashable: How a year of living online has changed us. “As work, school, and social interactions migrated online once COVID-19 became a global pandemic last March, the average monthly household data use in 2020 skyrocketed by 40 percent compared to the prior year, according to OpenVault, a global provider of broadband industry analytics. That figure includes tablet, computer, gaming console, and mobile phone data that uses a household’s broadband internet connection, but doesn’t reflect when someone accesses the internet through their cellular data. The average household now uses nearly a half a terabyte of data each month.”

California State University Northridge: CSUN Professor Studies How Screen Time Affects Child Development During Social Distancing

California State University Northridge: CSUN Professor Studies How Screen Time Affects Child Development During Social Distancing. “Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, many day-to-day interactions — such as learning, interacting with co-workers and socializing with friends and family — now take place through computer and phone screens. For parents of toddlers and young children, this has raised concerns about how this increase in screen time might affect their children’s development. While it may take some time before the effects of this increased screen interaction are known, California State University, Northridge child and adolescent development professor Emily Russell asserts that this isn’t necessarily all bad.”

EurekAlert: Excessive social media use linked to binge eating in US preteens

EurekAlert: Excessive social media use linked to binge eating in US preteens. “The study, published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders on March 1, found that each additional hour spent on social media was associated with a 62% higher risk of binge-eating disorder one year later. It also found that each additional hour spent watching or streaming television or movies led to a 39% higher risk of binge-eating disorder one year later.”

Pandemic parenting: Choosing educational apps and balancing screen time with remote learning (Mashable)

Mashable: Pandemic parenting: Choosing educational apps and balancing screen time with remote learning. “The most serious concern with screen time is that you don’t want a child to experience negative mental health effects of too much time inside the bubble of social media. This is a hard line to walk right now as many kids and teens are otherwise cut off from their friends. Balance among social media, other screen time, exercise, schoolwork, and hobbies is still the goal. But screen time can be a wonderfully rewarding and enriching activity when done conscientiously. It can even help kids cope with the changes in their lives right now.”

New York Times: I Was a Screen Time Expert. Then the Coronavirus Happened.

New York Times: I Was a Screen Time Expert. Then the Coronavirus Happened.. “Before the pandemic, I was a parenting expert. It was a cushy gig. In 2019, I boarded 34 flights. I checked into nice hotels, put on makeup and fitted jewel-toned dresses, strode onto stages large and dinky, and tried to project authoritative calm. I told worried parents about the nine signs of tech overuse, like ditching sleep for screens. I advised them to write a ‘family media contract’ and trust, but verify, their tweens’ doings online. While I was on the road, my two daughters were enjoying modest, cute little doses of Peppa Pig and Roblox, in between happily attending school, preschool, after-school activities and play dates, safe in the care of their father, grandmother and our full-time nanny. Now, like Socrates, I know better. I know that I know nothing.”

Neowin: Increased screen-time might be impacting the physical structure of children’s brains

Neowin: Increased screen-time might be impacting the physical structure of children’s brains. “The increasing usage and integration of smartphones in our lives, and those of our children, in particular, has often garnered criticism from many. As such, people have been wary about the potential downsides of the rampancy and what it entails. And one study probes into this issue.”