San Francisco Chronicle: Up your selfie game at Cantor Arts Center’s new Instagram-ready sculpture garden

San Francisco Chronicle: Up your selfie game at Cantor Arts Center’s new Instagram-ready sculpture garden. “The life-size bronze sculpture of St. Katharina painted Stanford Cardinal red stands ready to go viral on Instagram, and that’s the point. ‘We are trying to make this a 21st century museum so that we can connect with our 21st century audiences,’ says Susan Dackerman, who was hired in 2017 as director of the Cantor Arts Center.”

Engadget: Thanks to AR, the Statue of Liberty is more accessible than ever

Engadget: Thanks to AR, the Statue of Liberty is more accessible than ever. “Rather than build the Statue of Liberty in such a way that its 200,000-lb copper shell stood upright on its own, Gustave Eiffel — the man behind the eponymous tower — designed it around a massive inner framework. You might have already known this, but it’s the kind of detail that doesn’t often spring to mind unless you’re 1) a French/American history buff or 2) someone who has already been inside the thing. Thankfully, to coincide with the opening of the official Statue of Liberty museum this week, there’s a new AR-focused iOS app to give visitors and the far-flung curious an up-close look at France’s majestic gift to the US.”

Independent (Ireland): Rodin statue outside Nando’s among first to feature in new database

Independent (Ireland): Rodin statue outside Nando’s among first to feature in new database. “A statue of Eve by Auguste Rodin that sits outside a Nando’s restaurant in Harlow is one of the first to be included in a new database of publicly owned sculptures in the UK. Charitable organisation Art UK is working on what they say is the largest sculpture cataloguing project ever undertaken in the UK. They endeavour to have listed an estimated 150,000 pieces online by 2020.”

Unblocking naked Venus: Facebook OKs museum nudes after all (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Unblocking naked Venus: Facebook OKs museum nudes after all. “It seems Facebook can be friends with a topless Venus after all. The social media giant said Tuesday it mistakenly blocked a museum in Switzerland from using images of two statues—a marble Venus and a bronze of a nude, kneeling man—to promote an upcoming exhibit.” Facebook is really excellent at making mistakes like this, isn’t it?

Fuller Craft Museum: Fuller Craft Museum Launches New Digital Archive of Permanent Collection

Fuller Craft Museum: Fuller Craft Museum Launches New Digital Archive of Permanent Collection. “The Permanent Collection at Fuller Craft Museum spans the major craft media of wood, metal, glass, ceramic, and fiber, and includes a diverse range of object classifications, from baskets and jewelry to furniture and outdoor sculpture. The Museum began collecting craft objects in the early 1980s with new works grants from the Massachusetts Council on the Arts and Humanities, and ramped up in 2003 when the Museum’s Board of Directors voted unanimously to shift the focus of the institution to contemporary craft. Now, with nearly 800 objects in our collection and close to 500 emerging, mid-career, and established artists and creators, Fuller Craft represents a wide range of talent and style in contemporary craft.” The archive will be updated over time.

Indiana University: Indiana University and Uffizi Gallery unveil website featuring first set of 3D, digitized artifacts

Indiana University: Indiana University and Uffizi Gallery unveil website featuring first set of 3D, digitized artifacts. “As a result of a collaboration between Indiana University and the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy, it’s now possible to view some of the world’s most admired ancient artifacts and sculptures in 3D without traveling overseas.”

Arab News: ‘Guardian of Nineveh’: Iraqi statue destroyed by Daesh recreated, showcased in the heart of London

Arab News: ‘Guardian of Nineveh’: Iraqi statue destroyed by Daesh recreated, showcased in the heart of London. “Daesh militants smashed the original to pieces in 2015, but it has now been recreated by Iraqi-American artist Michael Rakowitz, using recycled cans that contained another treasure from Iraq — date syrup…. The sculpture was chosen from a shortlist of six and is part of a larger project by Rakowitz. The Chicago-based artist is gradually reconstructing the entire database of 7,000 works looted from the National Museum of Iraq in 2003 or destroyed at archaeological sites in the aftermath of the Iraq war.”