NOAA Tides & Currents: Prepare for coastal flooding with NOAA’s new online tool

NOAA Tides & Currents: Prepare for coastal flooding with NOAA’s new online tool. “NOAA has brought together data from its over 200 long term coastal water level stations into one web tool that can help coastal communities monitor and prepare for all types of coastal flooding. The Coastal Inundation Dashboard is a website that brings together real-time water level information, 48 hour forecasts of water levels, and historic flooding information into one powerful tool.”

Pacific Standard: Rising Sea Levels Are A Threat To World Heritage Sites

Pacific Standard: Rising Sea Levels Are A Threat To World Heritage Sites. “New research finds that rising sea levels due to climate change will put dozens of World Heritage Sites in the Mediterranean region at increased risk of flooding and erosion—threats many of the sites are already facing.”

Route Fifty: Crowdsourcing King Tides to Better Understand Rising Sea Levels

Route Fifty: Crowdsourcing King Tides to Better Understand Rising Sea Levels. “King tides are especially high tides that are amplified by astronomical events including the perihelion, when the Sun is closest to Earth in its orbit in early January. In low-lying coastal cities, like Miami Beach, Florida and Norfolk, Virginia, the highest tides of the year can bring flooding and give planners, local officials and the public a good opportunity to measure the incremental impacts of a changing climate. But like all tides, they’re also influenced by local topography. Washington state has more than 3,300 miles of coastline, which includes the various islands and inlets that comprise Puget Sound and its adjacent waterways.”

Route Fifty: Thousands of Miles of Internet Cables Could Be Underwater by 2033

Route Fifty: Thousands of Miles of Internet Cables Could Be Underwater by 2033. “Thousands of miles of fiber optic cables in coastal communities may be underwater within 15 years due to rising sea levels, threatening internet access for millions of people, according to a study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin and the University of Oregon.”

Hyperallergic: Rising Sea Levels Threaten Over 13,000 Archaeological Sites in the US

Hyperallergic: Rising Sea Levels Threaten Over 13,000 Archaeological Sites in the US. “Rising sea levels will lead to the loss of more than 13,000 historic and prehistoric archaeological sites across the southeastern United States by the end of the century, researchers have found. These include sites such as the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, St. Augustine in Florida — considered by many to be the nation’s oldest city — many Native American settlements, and countless cemeteries. The study, recently published in PLOS ONE, analyzed data from the Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA), an online database that collects archaeological and environmental data sets from a wide array of repositories, from JSTOR to the Digital Archaeological Record.”