CNET: Google is giving data to police based on search keywords, court docs show

CNET: Google is giving data to police based on search keywords, court docs show. “There are few things as revealing as a person’s search history, and police typically need a warrant on a known suspect to demand that sensitive information. But a recently unsealed court document found that investigators can request such data in reverse order by asking Google to disclose everyone who searched a keyword rather than for information on a known suspect.”

Bloomberg: Googling for Gut Symptoms Predicts Covid Hot Spots, Study Finds

Bloomberg: Googling for Gut Symptoms Predicts Covid Hot Spots, Study Finds. “Researchers at the top-ranked hospital in Boston compared search interest in loss of taste and appetite, and diarrhea with the reported incidence of Covid-19 in 15 U.S. states from Jan. 20 to April 20. Using Alphabet Inc.’s Google Trends online tool, they found the volume of searches correlated most strongly with cases in New York, New Jersey, California, Massachusetts and Illinois — states with high disease burden — three to four weeks later.”

Bing Blogs: Extracting Covid-19 insights from Bing search data

Bing Blogs: Extracting Covid-19 insights from Bing search data . “As is true for many other topics, search engine query logs may be able to give insight into the information gaps associated with Covid-19…. We are pleased to announce that we have already made Covid-19 query data freely available on GitHub as the Bing search dataset for Coronavirus intent, with scheduled updates every month over the course of the pandemic. This dataset includes explicit Covid-19 search queries containing terms such as corona, coronavirus, and covid, as well as implicit Covid-19 queries that are used to access the same set of web page search results (using the technique of random walks on the click graph).”

Things I’m Fonds Of: Searching for Answers in Archival Records (You can’t just Google them)

Things I’m Fonds Of: Searching for Answers in Archival Records (You can’t just Google them). “Anyone else out there addicted to Google Analytics? I regularly get lost down the rabbit hole of search queries that are being made on my archives’ online search portal. I want to know what researchers are looking for and if they are finding it. It’s fascinating to me, but also quite troubling. Recently a researcher typed in the following in the search bar: ‘City hall location in 1995’ Now, this is a perfectly valid piece of information that might be of interest to a resident of Coquitlam. But it points to a larger issue that I can’t figure out how to solve.”

CNET: Google’s top searches of 2017 were Hurricane Irma, Matt Lauer

CNET: Google’s top searches of 2017 were Hurricane Irma, Matt Lauer. “This was the year of #MeToo and hurricanes. And that was reflected in the way people searched for stuff online. Google said Wednesday that the two top trending topics of 2017 in the US were ‘Hurricane Irma’ and ‘Matt Lauer.’ In Google parlance, ‘top trending’ means they had the highest spike in traffic over a certain period of time this year compared to last year. The search giant also released a list of top global searches that featured a variety of queries about Apple’s iPhone.”

Quartz: However strange your search, chances are Google has seen it before

Quartz: However strange your search, chances are Google has seen it before. ” Trillions of queries are posed to Google every year. Alongside the mundane searches for recipes and random trivia are private questions too mortifying to pose directly to another human. People come to Google with desires, fears, and curiosities they can’t discuss anywhere else, but still must know: does anyone else think this way? The answer , it turns out, is very likely yes. Only 15% of the billions of estimated searches per day are queries the service hasn’t seen before, according to Google.”