Northumbria University: Design meets artificial intelligence to create new visual search engine

Northumbria University: Design meets artificial intelligence to create new visual search engine. “Novel methods of searching the nation’s gallery, library and museum collections could soon be revolutionised by a visual search platform designed in collaboration with Northumbria University. As the sector worldwide moves towards presenting collections online, the Deep Discoveries project was launched to explore ways of creating a computer vision search platform that can identify and match images across digitised collections on a national scale.” A beta version of the search is available.

Ohio State News: Groundbreaking ideas from women scientists get less attention

Ohio State News: Groundbreaking ideas from women scientists get less attention. “Researchers used a novel way of tracing the flow of ideas to find that even some of the most well-known breakthroughs in biomedical research from 1980 to 2008 had a more difficult road to adoption when research teams were dominated by women. Specifically, the five-year adoption rate of new ideas from female-majority teams was 23% lower than that of male-majority teams – even among the top 0.1% of ideas.”

The History of Video Search: Who’s Still Standing, Who Isn’t, and New Players in the Space (The Collegian)

The Collegian: The History of Video Search: Who’s Still Standing, Who Isn’t, and New Players in the Space. “You may be wondering how video search has fared amidst the constant shifts in popularity and functionality, and it’s a thought worth considering. Video content is being consumed more and more online, with some platforms boasting staggering statistics: almost 5 billion videos are viewed on YouTube every day. Below is a brief overview of video search to better understand the digital playing field.”

Navigating Bitcoin, Ethereum, XRP: How Google Is Quietly Making Blockchains Searchable (Forbes Africa)

Forbes Africa: Navigating Bitcoin, Ethereum, XRP: How Google Is Quietly Making Blockchains Searchable. “It’s a balmy 80 degrees on a mid-December day in Singapore, and something is puzzling Allen Day, a 41-year-old data scientist. Using the tools he has developed at Google, he can see a mysterious concerted usage of artificial intelligence on the blockchain for Ethereum. Ether is the world’s third-largest cryptocurrency (after bitcoin and XRP), and it still sports a market cap of some $11 billion despite losing 83% of its value in 2018. Peering into its blockchain—the distributed database of transactions underpinning the cryptocurrency—Day detects a ‘whole bunch’ of ‘autonomous agents’ moving funds around ‘in an automated fashion.’”

CNBC: We sat in on an internal Google meeting where they talked about changing the search algorithm — here’s what we learned

CNBC: We sat in on an internal Google meeting where they talked about changing the search algorithm — here’s what we learned. “In an effort to demystify how it runs its search engine, the company invited CNBC to sit in on an internal meeting where search executives discussed whether or not to approve one particular change: whether to put images next to some kinds of search results. The proposed change was small and hyper-specific, and Google’s decision was predictably data-driven. Ultimately, the meeting revealed both the grand complexity and the incremental simplicity of how Google shapes its search product.”

The New Yorker: How to Conduct an Open-Source Investigation, According to the Founder of Bellingcat

The New Yorker: How to Conduct an Open-Source Investigation, According to the Founder of Bellingcat. “On a recent afternoon in central London, twelve people sat in a hotel conference room trying to figure out the exact latitude and longitude at which the actress Sharon Stone once posed for a photo in front of the Taj Mahal. Among them were two reporters, a human-rights lawyer, and researchers and analysts in the fields of international conflict, forensic science, online extremism, and computer security. They had each paid around twenty-four hundred dollars to join a five-day workshop led by Eliot Higgins, the founder of the open-source investigation Web site Bellingcat. Higgins had chosen this Sharon Stone photo because the photographer was standing on a raised terrace, which makes the angles confusing, and used a lens that makes Stone appear closer to the Taj than she actually was. The participants, working on laptops, compared […]

Google Blog: Helping you find useful information fast on Search

Google Blog: Helping you find useful information fast on Search. “Imagine you’re remodeling your kitchen, and you want information about how quartz compares to granite for your new countertops. Sure, Google can tell you what quartz and granite are, but that’s perhaps not what you had in mind. Chances are you’re hoping to learn more about the differences in cost, benefits, and durability of each, and may be looking for guidance on other subtopics to explore. For these types of queries, we’re introducing a new way to get you to relevant information fast and help you get a glimpse of multiple aspects of a topic with a single search.”

MakeUseOf: 7 Facebook Search Tips to Find What You’re Looking For

MakeUseOf: 7 Facebook Search Tips to Find What You’re Looking For. “The social network is arguably the biggest repository of personal information in existence. But—in typical Facebook fashion—it’s not always easy to sift through and find the information you need at any given moment. If you’re nodding along, you probably need some help searching Facebook. So, keep reading as we introduce you to the best tips to help you find what you’re looking for.”

Google: Hyphens In Search Queries Can Change Results (SEO Roundtable)

SEO Roundtable: Google: Hyphens In Search Queries Can Change Results. “If someone searches for a word or term with or without a hyphen, Google can show different search results based on the query having a hyphen in it or not. So for example, [popup-style] vs [popup style] or [s-eo] vs [seo]. The question originally came up in a Moz Community thread, which no one had a solid answer for so John Mueller from Google was asked about it on Twitter.”

The Verge: Slack introduces a new search feature powered by artificial intelligence

The Verge: Slack introduces a new search feature powered by artificial intelligence. “Slack is rolling out an improved search experience today bolstered by sophisticated machine learning, the company said. The feature, which was built by the company’s year-old search learning and intelligence group, is designed to help users find relevant channels and subject matter experts more quickly than traditional search.”

Copernic Desktop Search 6 Now Available (PRESS RELEASE)

If you’re a Web searcher of A Certain Age you might remember Copernic and its desktop search software. Well, hang on to your nostalgia because version 6 is now available (PRESS RELEASE). “The technology behind Copernic Desktop Search 6, the Company’s award-wining Desktop Search product, was completely overhauled to add brand new search capabilities. By doing so, users can now benefit from features such ‘search Microsoft OneNote®’, ‘support for Lotus Notes 9’ and ‘searching for Microsoft Outlook® Offline PST’.”

Fagan Finder Gets an Update

Fagan Finder, a search tools Web site from wayyyyy back, has gotten its first update in over six years! (We missed you, Michael!) Both the video search page and the groups search page have been overhauled. These are excellent sites for reference or when you need a quick overview of what’s available in a particular search space.