CNN: How Russian threats in the 2000s turned this country into the go-to expert on cyber defense

CNN: How Russian threats in the 2000s turned this country into the go-to expert on cyber defense. “When people like the German Chancellor Angela Merkel or the King of Belgium want to learn more about cybersecurity, they go to Estonia. The Baltic country runs on the internet. From filing taxes and voting, to registering the birth of a new baby, nearly everything a person might want or need from the government can be done online. It’s an approach that’s incredibly convenient for Estonia’s 1.3 million people — but it also requires high level of cybersecurity.”

TechRadar: Google Docs is being weaponized by hackers

TechRadar: Google Docs is being weaponized by hackers. “Web-based word processor Google Docs is being actively exploited to disguise dangerous web domains, security analysts have warned. As discovered by security firm Avanan, cybercriminals have found a way to conceal attacks behind standard Google Docs URLs, which can be delivered to victims via email without triggering security software.”

Wired: A New Tool Wants to Save Open Source From Supply Chain Attacks

Wired: A New Tool Wants to Save Open Source From Supply Chain Attacks. “RUSSIA’S HISTORICALLY DESTRUCTIVE NotPetya malware attack and its more recent SolarWinds cyberespionage campaign have something in common besides the Kremlin: They’re both real-world examples of software supply chain attacks. It’s a term for what happens when a hacker slips malicious code into legitimate software that can spread far and wide. And as more supply chain attacks emerge, a new open source project is angling to take a stand, making a crucial safeguard free and easy to implement.”

NBC News: 50,000 security disasters waiting to happen: The problem of America’s water supplies

NBC News: 50,000 security disasters waiting to happen: The problem of America’s water supplies. “…of all the country’s critical infrastructure, water might be the most vulnerable to hackers: the hardest in which to guarantee everyone follows basic cybersecurity steps, and the easiest in which to cause major, real-world harm to large numbers of people.”

ZDNet: Over a billion records belonging to CVS Health exposed online

ZDNet: Over a billion records belonging to CVS Health exposed online. “On Thursday, WebsitePlanet, together with researcher Jeremiah Fowler, revealed the discovery of an online database belonging to CVS Health. The database was not password-protected and had no form of authentication in place to prevent unauthorized entry. Upon examination of the database, the team found over one billion records that were connected to the US healthcare and pharmaceutical giant, which owns brands including CVS Pharmacy and Aetna.”

WICZ: Wegmans Notifies Customers Of Database Security Breach

WICZ: Wegmans Notifies Customers Of Database Security Breach. “Wegmans says they were notified of the issue by a third-party security researcher in mid-April. The company says the database contains customer phone numbers, addresses, email addresses, Shopper’s Club Card numbers, and passwords to Wegmans.com. However, Wegmans says all passwords were encrypted, so the actual characters for the passwords were not involved.”

ZDNet: This app teaches you how to make your iPhone secure

ZDNet: This app teaches you how to make your iPhone secure. “First and foremost, iVerify is a security scanner that makes sure you are making use of the basic security features such as Face/Touch ID, Screen Lock, and are running the latest iOS version. It also runs a device scan that looks for security anomalies and gives you a heads up if something seems out of place.” Not free, but the price is only $2.99.

TechSpot: Malware-packed pirated games infected millions of PCs, stealing data and hijacking webcams to photograph users

TechSpot: Malware-packed pirated games infected millions of PCs, stealing data and hijacking webcams to photograph users. “If you’re ever tempted to download a pirated game or app, remember that in addition to being illegal, there’s the risk of it containing some nasty malware. Millions of PCs were infected with a trojan virus using this method, leading to the theft of over 1TB of data, including email addresses, login credentials, and documents. It was even able to hijack a webcam and photograph users.”

East Idaho News: Meet the woman behind the largest online missing persons cold case database

East Idaho News: Meet the woman behind the largest online missing persons cold case database. “Meaghan Good is the woman behind the largest missing persons cold case database on the internet.In 2004, she founded the Charley Project a week after her nineteenth birthday. There are currently 14,000 ‘cold case’ missing people on the website – most from the United States. The site relies on donations and the teacher salary of Good’s husband.”