South China Morning Post: Laptops containing 3.7 million Hong Kong voters’ data stolen after chief executive election

South China Morning Post: Laptops containing 3.7 million Hong Kong voters’ data stolen after chief executive election. “In what could be one of Hong Kong’s most significant data breaches ever, the personal information of the city’s 3.7 million voters was possibly compromised after the Registration and Electoral Office reported two laptop computers went missing at its backup venue for the chief executive election.”

Naked Security: LastPass steps up quickly to fix vulnerabilities spotted by researchers

Naked Security: LastPass steps up quickly to fix vulnerabilities spotted by researchers. “LastPass suffers occasional software vulnerabilities, including the odd very serious one – nothing unusual in that perhaps – but then immediately sets to work fixing them. We mention this not to laud LastPass to the skies with a tear in our eye but because it’s what all software companies with millions of users should do in this situation. Serious flaws shouldn’t be there in the first place, but before a single line of code has been re-written it’s a question of attitude.”

Protecting web users’ privacy: System for disguising database queries could prevent customer profiling and price gouging. (MIT News)

MIT News: Protecting web users’ privacy: System for disguising database queries could prevent customer profiling and price gouging.. “Most website visits these days entail a database query — to look up airline flights, for example, or to find the fastest driving route between two addresses. But online database queries can reveal a surprising amount of information about the people making them. And some travel sites have been known to jack up the prices on flights whose routes are drawing an unusually high volume of queries.”

PC World: Three privacy tools that block your Internet provider from tracking you

PC World: Three privacy tools that block your Internet provider from tracking you. “It’s on. Recently, the United States Senate saw fit to allow Internet Service Providers to sell your web browsing history and other data to third parties. The action has yet to pass the House, but if it does, it means anyone concerned about privacy will have to protect themselves against over zealous data collection from their ISP. Some privacy-conscious folks are already doing that—but many aren’t.”

MakeUseOf: Secure Your Facebook With These 6 Simple Tricks

MakeUseOf: Secure Your Facebook With These 6 Simple Tricks. “Facebook’s ubiquity makes it dangerous in so many ways. Aside from the threat of picking up malware, the ever-present risk of someone hacking your account — plus privacy issues from Facebook itself — mean you must be vigilant when using the service. Thankfully, it only takes a few moments to make sure you’re not at risk for Facebook issues. Here are six easy ways to avoid becoming a victim on Facebook.”

CBR: Symantec dealt major blow as Google loses trust in security certificates

CBR: Symantec dealt major blow as Google loses trust in security certificates. “Google are aiming to boost the confidence of Chrome users with engineers announcing plans to reduce trust in Symantec certificates. This gradual shift is set to reach a point in early 2018 when Chrome 64 will only trust certificates that are issued from Symantec for 279 days or less. The scale of the misissuance by Symantec has exploded from an initial 127 certificates under scrutiny, to a figure noted as at least 30,000.”