Angry Residents, Abrupt Stops: Waymo Vehicles Are Still Causing Problems in Arizona (Phoenix New Times)

Phoenix New Times: Angry Residents, Abrupt Stops: Waymo Vehicles Are Still Causing Problems in Arizona. “A driverless Waymo vehicle caused a crash in October by stopping unexpectedly in the middle of the road, displaying a technical malfunction the Google-related company claims is rare. In another 2020 incident, a police officer claimed a sudden stop by a Waymo vehicle caused a rear-end collision, but the officer was cited. The incidents are detailed in newly released police reports obtained by Phoenix New Times that shed fresh light on the function and operations of the driverless vehicles, which are often cloaked in secrecy.”

University of Warwick: World’s largest public scenario database for testing and assuring safe Autonomous Vehicle deployments

University of Warwick: World’s largest public scenario database for testing and assuring safe Autonomous Vehicle deployments. “The Safety PoolTM Scenario Database, the largest public repository of scenarios for testing autonomous vehicles in the world, has been launched today by WMG at the University of Warwick, and Deepen AI. The database provides a diverse set of scenarios in different operational design domains (ODDs i.e. operating conditions) that can be leveraged by governments, industry and academia alike to test and benchmark Automated Driving Systems (ADSs) and use insights to inform policy and regulatory guidelines.”

Wired: This AI Could Go From ‘Art’ to Steering a Self-Driving Car

Wired: This AI Could Go From ‘Art’ to Steering a Self-Driving Car. “YOU’VE PROBABLY NEVER wondered what a knight made of spaghetti would look like, but here’s the answer anyway—courtesy of a clever new artificial intelligence program from OpenAI, a company in San Francisco. The program, DALL-E, released earlier this month, can concoct images of all sorts of weird things that don’t exist, like avocado armchairs, robot giraffes, or radishes wearing tutus. OpenAI generated several images, including the spaghetti knight, at WIRED’s request.”

TechCrunch: Track autonomous vehicle testing in your state with this new tool from the US government

TechCrunch: Track autonomous vehicle testing in your state with this new tool from the US government . “The official name of the online tool — Automated Vehicle Transparency and Engagement for Safe Testing Initiative tracking tool — is a jargony mess of a word salad. Fortunately, its mechanics are straightforward. The online tool gives users the ability to find information about on-road testing of automated vehicles in 17 cities throughout the United States. The public can find out information about a company’s on-road testing and safety performance, the number of vehicles in its fleet as well as AV-related legislation or policy in specific states.”

CNET RoadShow: Russian company Yandex sets up self-driving car testing in Ann Arbor, Michigan

CNET RoadShow: Russian company Yandex sets up self-driving car testing in Ann Arbor, Michigan. “Yandex is a regular attendee of CES in Las Vegas, and now, according an announcement… by the company, it’s getting even more of a foothold in the US. Specifically, it’s opening a facility in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Why Michigan? Unlike cities such as Moscow and Tel Aviv, where Yandex also tests, Michigan allows self-driving cars to operate without an engineer behind the wheel, and Yandex is already taking advantage of that.”

9to5 Google: Waymo Content Search can find billions of objects encountered over 20M miles in seconds

9to5 Google: Waymo Content Search can find billions of objects encountered over 20M miles in seconds. “As of early 2020, Waymo self-driving vehicles have driven 20 million miles on public roads. That makes for vast amounts of recorded sensor data to improve the autonomous system. Waymo today detailed its Content Search tool and database with billions of encountered road objects.”

University of Oregon: Urbanism Next launches the NEXUS online clearinghouse

University of Oregon: Urbanism Next launches the NEXUS online clearinghouse. “Created by the UO’s Urbanism Next Center in partnership with NUMO Alliance, NEXUS is a comprehensive, vetted source of information that explores the potential effects of innovations such as new mobility, autonomous vehicles and the rise of e-commerce. Going beyond the technologies themselves, NEXUS sheds light on possible long-term and compounding influences of these technologies on cities and communities.”

Phys .org: Deep learning enables real-time imaging around corners

Phys .org: Deep learning enables real-time imaging around corners . “Researchers have harnessed the power of a type of artificial intelligence known as deep learning to create a new laser-based system that can image around corners in real time. With further development, the system might let self-driving cars ‘look’ around parked cars or busy intersections to see hazards or pedestrians. It could also be installed on satellites and spacecraft for tasks such as capturing images inside a cave on an asteroid.”

The Verge: Waymo is making some of its self-driving car data available for free to researchers

The Verge: Waymo is making some of its self-driving car data available for free to researchers. “The data collected by self-driving cars used to be a closely guarded secret. But recently, many companies developing autonomous driving systems have begun to release their data to the research community in dribs and drabs. The latest to do so is Waymo, the self-driving unit of Alphabet, which today is making some of the high-resolution sensor data gathered by its fleet of autonomous vehicles available to researchers.”

MIT Technology Review: Crowdsourced maps should help driverless cars navigate our cities more safely

MIT Technology Review: Crowdsourced maps should help driverless cars navigate our cities more safely. “Our current street maps aren’t much good for helping driverless cars get around. Although we’ve mapped most roads, they get updated only every couple of years. And these maps don’t log any roadside infrastructure such as road signs, driveways, and lane markings. Without this extra layer of information, it will be much harder to get autonomous cars to navigate our cities safely. Robotic deliveries, too, will eventually require precise details of road surfaces, sidewalks, and obstacles.”

MIT Technology Review: Should a self-driving car kill the baby or the grandma? Depends on where you’re from

MIT Technology Review: Should a self-driving car kill the baby or the grandma? Depends on where you’re from. “In 2014 researchers at the MIT Media Lab designed an experiment called Moral Machine. The idea was to create a game-like platform that would crowdsource people’s decisions on how self-driving cars should prioritize lives in different variations of the ‘trolley problem.’ In the process, the data generated would provide insight into the collective ethical priorities of different cultures. The researchers never predicted the experiment’s viral reception.”

Engadget: Yandex begins public tests of its self-driving cars in Russia

Engadget: Yandex begins public tests of its self-driving cars in Russia. “Russia’s Yandex has taken its self-driving efforts one step further, launching an autonomous ride-hailing service in the university city of Innopolis, Russia. The company claims it’s the first such service to launch in Europe. For now, there will be two self-driving vehicles in operation and they’ll provide rides to specific locations, such as the university, the stadium and residential blocks, for free. A safety engineer will ride in the passenger seat and around 100 people have agreed to test the service.”