EurekAlert: Does posting edited self photos on social media increase risk of eating disorders?

EurekAlert: Does posting edited self photos on social media increase risk of eating disorders?. “New research revealed a consistent and direct link between posting edited photos on Instagram and risk factors for eating disorders. Specifically, digitally editing pictures to improve personal appearance before posting photos to Instagram increased weight and shape concerns in college students.”

Salon: A new Instagram meme is actually good for your body image, study says

Salon: A new Instagram meme is actually good for your body image, study says. “A new study from Australian researchers published in the journal New Media & Society tested the theory that clearly marking edited photos as fake might mitigate the negative thoughts that emerge from the comparison process. In the study, 305 U.S. women between the ages of 18 to 30 were randomly assigned to view one of three sets of Instagram images: ‘Instagram vs reality’ images, the ‘ideal[ized]’ photo alone, or the ‘real’ photo alone.”

TechCrunch: Now Facebook says it may remove Like counts

TechCrunch: Now Facebook says it may remove Like counts. “Facebook could soon start hiding the Like counter on News Feed posts to protect users’ from envy and dissuade them from self-censorship. Instagram is already testing this in 7 countries including Canada and Brazil, showing a post’s audience just a few names of mutual friends who’ve Liked it instead of the total number.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Research looks at how Snapchat filters affect self-image

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Research looks at how Snapchat filters affect self-image. “While observing heavy use of selfie apps such as Snapchat, graduate student Amy Niu found herself wondering about the effects that virtual makeovers have on college-age females. Apps such as Snapchat and others offer users photographic filters that change their look. In China, where Niu is originally from, apps similar to this are used even more heavily than they are in the United States.”

EurekAlert: Facebook can help college students with lower confidence build relationships

EurekAlert: Facebook can help college students with lower confidence build relationships. “Facebook can help first-semester college students maintain relationships with high school friends and assist them in creating new friendships, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. When it comes to making new friends, those with higher confidence in their social skills have less to gain from relying on Facebook, while people with lower confidence in their social skills have more to gain from a reliance on the social media platform.”

New York Times: What if Instagram Got Rid of Likes?

New York Times: What if Instagram Got Rid of Likes?. “Following years of increasing scrutiny, leaders at each company seem to be gathering around the same small solution: adjusting or eliminating metrics. This would represent a notable turn for services so strongly identified with public, comparable and newly valuable numbers. It also raises the question: If this is their solution, what do these people think is the problem?”

The Scotsman: Holyrood advisory group to examine links between body image anxiety and social media

The Scotsman: Holyrood advisory group to examine links between body image anxiety and social media. “A new group will advise the Scottish Government on how to promote and achieve a healthy body image to help tackle Scotland’s mental health crisis. The advisory group – whose members have not yet been announced – will look at links between social media use and body image issues.”

ScienceBlog: Surprising Link Between Social Media And Happiness

ScienceBlog: Surprising Link Between Social Media And Happiness. “People flock to Facebook to see the latest wedding news, vacation photos, new baby arrival, or home purchase. Most people, research indicates, head to their newsfeeds to passively watch and compare, much more often than post their own news or updates. But, it turns out, some of us prefer to look at and compare ourselves to certain types of individuals: those who make us feel better about ourselves. And that, in turn, can lead to an increase in happiness and life satisfaction.”

University of Manchester: Research exposes pitfalls of opening up on social media

University of Manchester: Research exposes pitfalls of opening up on social media. “Opening up about your feelings on social media has an association with lower self-esteem, mood, paranoia and opinions about the self in comparison to others according to a new study. Dr Natalie Berry, a psychology researcher at The University of Manchester says venting our anger on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram is also linked to subsequent increases in paranoia, and reductions in self-esteem and mood.”

CNET: How Reddit helped me tackle my biggest insecurity

CNET: How Reddit helped me tackle my biggest insecurity. “Like many preteens going through puberty, I had acne. And like many preteens suffering from the problem, I was mortified by it. Starting when I was 12, each new blistering breakout made me anxious to go outside (let alone attend school), talk to my classmates and meet new people. While my skin cleared up a bit once I emerged from the universally awkward hell known as adolescence, I still have leftover facial scarring and intermittent breakouts that make me apprehensive to appear in photos or CNET videos without makeup. But recently, I’ve begun to embrace this lingering insecurity. And surprisingly, it all stems from Reddit, a site many consider to be the most toxic place on the internet because of the infamous vitriol and trolling by some of its millions and millions of anonymous users.”

Mashable: Upholding my online identity gives me so much anxiety

Mashable: Upholding my online identity gives me so much anxiety. “Social media is a sound bite, a snapshot. You get to show neatly manicured moments without the burden of life’s small talk and unflattering angles. Unfortunately, this presents a problem for our real selves. How can we not feel like failures compared to those other versions of ourselves?” I find being just as foolish and goofy on social media as I am in real life helps.

Texas Tech Today: Self-Presentation Style on Facebook Linked to Suggestive Well-Being

Texas Tech Today: Self-Presentation Style on Facebook Linked to Suggestive Well-Being. “Despite the platform’s well-publicized problems, the positive possibilities of Facebook use intrigued Texas Tech University researchers Eric Wonseok Jang, Erik Bucy and Janice Cho in the College of Media & Communication. Jang and colleagues wanted to investigate how self-esteem influences subjective well-being when user posts on the social media platform vary between a true self-presentation style and a strategic style.”

EurekAlert: Motivation for using fake Instagram (Finsta) is not to reveal inappropriate self

EurekAlert: Motivation for using fake Instagram (Finsta) is not to reveal inappropriate self . “As Instagram is viewed as a place for building the ideal self, some users have created fake Instagram (Finsta) accounts to buck this trend. But are these ‘fake’ accounts really there to express the real, sometimes ugly self, or is there a deeper motivation? A recent study by researchers at Pennsylvania State University, found that users align their real Instagram accounts (Rinsta) with their actual self and to escape from reality, whereas Finsta to foster social bonding.”