BBC: Instagram photo filters targeted by model’s #filterdrop campaign

BBC: Instagram photo filters targeted by model’s #filterdrop campaign. “A recent survey, carried out by Girlguiding, found a third of girls and young women will not post selfies online without using a filter to change their appearance. Thirty-nine percent of the 1,473 respondents, aged 11-21, said they felt upset that they could not look the same in real life as they did online. The survey results mirror the worries of make-up artist and curve model Sasha Pallari, who recently launched the hashtag #filterdrop in the hope of seeing ‘more real skin’ on Instagram.”

New York Times: Don’t Like What You See on Zoom? Get a Face-Lift and Join the Crowd

New York Times: Don’t Like What You See on Zoom? Get a Face-Lift and Join the Crowd. “A growing number of people, stuck at home and tired of staring at their own haggard faces on Zoom, are finding a fix: face and eye lifts, chin and tummy tucks and more. At a time when many medical fields are reeling from lockdowns when lucrative electives work was postponed, cosmetic surgery procedures are surging, practitioners say, driven by unexpected demand from patients who have found the coronavirus pandemic a perfect moment for corporeal upgrades.”

EurekAlert: Does posting edited self photos on social media increase risk of eating disorders?

EurekAlert: Does posting edited self photos on social media increase risk of eating disorders?. “New research revealed a consistent and direct link between posting edited photos on Instagram and risk factors for eating disorders. Specifically, digitally editing pictures to improve personal appearance before posting photos to Instagram increased weight and shape concerns in college students.”

PsychCentral: Social Media Messages to Inspire Exercise May Backfire

PsychCentral: Social Media Messages to Inspire Exercise May Backfire. “A new Australian study suggests an Instagram movement to promote better health is flawed. Researchers discovered the images associated with an online program appear to make many women feel worse about themselves and their bodies rather than inspiring them to exercise.”

BBC: Eating disorder used to sell diets on Instagram

BBC: Eating disorder used to sell diets on Instagram. “Instagram accounts are using images of a person recovering from an eating disorder to advertise weight loss. The BBC has seen more than 30 accounts using the photos and some of them have more than a million followers.”

Salon: A new Instagram meme is actually good for your body image, study says

Salon: A new Instagram meme is actually good for your body image, study says. “A new study from Australian researchers published in the journal New Media & Society tested the theory that clearly marking edited photos as fake might mitigate the negative thoughts that emerge from the comparison process. In the study, 305 U.S. women between the ages of 18 to 30 were randomly assigned to view one of three sets of Instagram images: ‘Instagram vs reality’ images, the ‘ideal[ized]’ photo alone, or the ‘real’ photo alone.”

EurekAlert: Social media use and disordered eating in young adolescents

EurekAlert: Social media use and disordered eating in young adolescents . “New research suggests that social media, particularly platforms with a strong focus on image posting and viewing, is associated with disordered eating in young adolescents. In the study, which is published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, researchers examined data on 996 grade 7 and 8 adolescents.”

Moms: The Pressure For Perfection On Instagram Is Putting People Into Debt

Moms: The Pressure For Perfection On Instagram Is Putting People Into Debt. “It can be easy to look at your Instagram feed and suddenly feel like your life is lacking in some way. Staring at the perfectly curated and filtered feeds of the young and gorgeous enjoying amazing trips while wearing gorgeous clothes and dining at incredibly hip restaurants can leave some feeling like they’re missing out in some way, and that is resulting in many people going into debt.”

Phys .org: Too real, or too fake? Female Instagram influencers in ‘authenticity bind’

Phys. org: Too real, or too fake? Female Instagram influencers in ‘authenticity bind’. “Female Instagram influencers—whose livelihoods depend on their numbers of followers, views and likes—endure criticism and harassment both for being too real and for seeming too fake, according to a new study from Cornell University.”

Molly Russell: Instagram extends self-harm ban to drawings (BBC)

BBC: Molly Russell: Instagram extends self-harm ban to drawings. “Instagram has pledged to remove images, drawings and even cartoons showing methods of self-harm or suicide. The move is its latest response to the public outcry over the death of British teenager Molly Russell.”

The Next Web: Instagram will remove filters promoting cosmetic surgery amid mental health concerns

The Next Web: Instagram will remove filters promoting cosmetic surgery amid mental health concerns. “Over the past few months, filters like ‘Plastica’ — an effect that gives you extreme plastic surgery — have become increasingly popular, even viral. But with their rapid popularity comes growing concerns over the impact they may have on young people’s body image.”

KCAL: New Instagram Policy Restricts Minors From Seeing Posts Promoting Weight Loss, Cosmetic Surgery

KCAL: New Instagram Policy Restricts Minors From Seeing Posts Promoting Weight Loss, Cosmetic Surgery. “Instagram users, including influencers and celebrities, will soon be restricted from seeing certain posts. The app announced that it will be restricting anyone under the age of 18 from seeing posts that promote weight loss products and certain cosmetic surgeries.”

VR Beyond Entertainment: How Avatar Embodiment Increases Our Cognitive Performance (Binary District)

Binary District: VR Beyond Entertainment: How Avatar Embodiment Increases Our Cognitive Performance. “The high immersive capacity of virtual reality is often acknowledged as its main virtue when compared to other media and communication technologies. It is indeed a defining virtue. However, when it comes to the virtue that could really position VR as a powerful positive technology in the market, we have to look at another key feature: avatar embodiment.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Research looks at how Snapchat filters affect self-image

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Research looks at how Snapchat filters affect self-image. “While observing heavy use of selfie apps such as Snapchat, graduate student Amy Niu found herself wondering about the effects that virtual makeovers have on college-age females. Apps such as Snapchat and others offer users photographic filters that change their look. In China, where Niu is originally from, apps similar to this are used even more heavily than they are in the United States.”