Hey, Google? Alexa? Am I At Risk for Alzheimer’s?: UMass Boston Professor Part of $1.1M Research Project (UMass Boston)

UMass Boston: Hey, Google? Alexa? Am I At Risk for Alzheimer’s?: UMass Boston Professor Part of $1.1M Research Project. “Assistant Professor of Computer Science Xiaohui Liang is leading a four-year $1,179,714 National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded research project to use Voice Assistant Systems, such as Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home, to detect early cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias in older adults living alone is essential for developing, planning, and ensuring adequate support at home for patients and their families.”

McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: CMS to streamline Nursing Home Compare, other Compare websites for consumers

McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: CMS to streamline Nursing Home Compare, other Compare websites for consumers . “Long-term care providers could soon see changes to the Nursing Home Compare website under the latest initiative by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The agency announced Thursday that it plans to combine and standardize its eight separate Compare websites: Nursing Home, Hospital, Home Health, Dialysis Facility, Long-Term Care Hospital, Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility, Physician and Hospice.”

‘This is not right’: Medicare’s plan guide was so messed up, it’s offering a do-over (Kansas City Star)

Kansas City Star: ‘This is not right’: Medicare’s plan guide was so messed up, it’s offering a do-over. “The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services added a new planning tool to its website, and it was so confusing — even for experts like [Kelly G.] Loeb — that congressional leaders have called for officials to publicize a special do-over period to give recipients another chance to enroll in the right plan. Loeb and other Medicare counselors worry that Medicare users could feel the aftershocks when they get their prescriptions this month.”

Slate: The Very Respectful Wikipedia Battles Over “OK Boomer”

Slate: The Very Respectful Wikipedia Battles Over “OK Boomer”. “The Wikipedia user Linguaddict drafted the first version of the OK Boomer Wikipedia page on Nov. 4. The article’s prospects were touch-and-go there at the beginning. Two editors declined the article, with one saying that it should instead be a subsection on the Baby Boomer entry, and the other that the neologism failed to meet Wikipedia’s infamous notability guidelines. But within two days, the article was accepted. Since its official publication on Nov. 6, the entry has received more than 700,000 page views on Wikipedia directly, and it’s had even greater reach through search engine results and the digital assistants that sample from the site’s publicly-available content.”

Smashing Magazine: Creating Online Environments That Work Well For Older Users

Smashing Magazine: Creating Online Environments That Work Well For Older Users. “Even though we’re as tech-savvy as anyone else, older users have some specific needs that web designers and programmers should consider. None of them are particularly difficult to accommodate, but they can be critical for our use and enjoyment of the Internet. As a bonus, you’ll be designing environments that will also work for you when you get older. ‘Older’ meaning ‘past forty’.” Every Web designer who thinks gray-on-gray text is just swell should be forced to copy this article fifty times.

BuzzFeed News: How A Massive Facebook Scam Siphoned Millions Of Dollars From Unsuspecting Boomers

BuzzFeed News: How A Massive Facebook Scam Siphoned Millions Of Dollars From Unsuspecting Boomers. “Since 2015, Ads Inc. has made money — lots of it — by executing one of the internet’s most persistent, lucrative, and sophisticated scams: the subscription trap. The subscription trap works by tricking people into buying what they think is a single free trial of a celebrity-endorsed product. Although the customers would receive the product — which in most cases was not made by Ads Inc. itself — in reality, the celebrity has nothing to do with the offer. And in purchasing the free trial, the customer unwittingly commits to a pricey monthly subscription designed to be hard to cancel.” This might explain some of the Facebook account renting as well.

The Conversation: Truly smart homes could help dementia patients live independently

The Conversation: Truly smart homes could help dementia patients live independently. “The growing number of people with dementia is encouraging care providers to look to technology as a way of supporting human carers and improving patients’ quality of life. In particular, we want to use technology to help people with dementia live more independently for as long as possible.”