University of Edinburgh: Subsea cables could transform ocean monitoring

University of Edinburgh: Subsea cables could transform ocean monitoring. “Despite sensing technologies advancing significantly in recent years, oceans and seas remain largely unmonitored as installing permanent ocean-floor sensors is very expensive. The new technique could tap into existing networks of subsea cables that crisscross the ocean floor – spanning hundreds of thousands of miles – to create a vast array of environmental sensors, the team says.”

The Register: Will I inhale coronavirus at this restaurant? There’s an app for that

The Register: Will I inhale coronavirus at this restaurant? There’s an app for that. “The Ventilation View app relies on the presence of a CO2 sensor that Chiyoda Ward is giving away to businesses. Once that sensor is installed, and transmitting data, the venue – be it a restaurant and or some other place – will appear on a map, complete with an air quality rating. A rating of 1,000 parts per million or lower of carbon dioxide indicates there’s adequate ventilation to avoid coming down with coronavirus.”

Make Tech Easier: How to Measure Altitude Using Your Phone

Make Tech Easier: How to Measure Altitude Using Your Phone. “Measuring your altitude on your phone can reveal much about the weather and living conditions of your location. While you may often use your phone’s location for 2D street-level navigation, those same satellites can also help you find your distance above sea level. This tutorial shows how when paired with a barometric pressure sensor and a data connection (if there’s one available), your phone can measure your altitude with surprising accuracy.”

Automotive World: Jaguar Land Rover and Google measure Dublin air quality with all-electric I-PACE

Automotive World: Jaguar Land Rover and Google measure Dublin air quality with all-electric I-PACE. “Jaguar Land Rover has partnered with Google to integrate the all-electric Jaguar I-PACE with air quality measuring sensors and Street View mapping technology. The I-PACE is the first all-electric Google Street View vehicle and will be used to measure street-by-street air quality in Dublin including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, and fine particles (PM2.5). It will also help update Google Maps.”

Nature: Make more digital twins

Nature: Make more digital twins. “Digital twins — precise, virtual copies of machines or systems — are revolutionizing industry. Driven by data collected from sensors in real time, these sophisticated computer models mirror almost every facet of a product, process or service. Many major companies already use digital twins to spot problems and increase efficiency1. Half of all corporations might be using them by 2021, one analyst predicts2.”

OPEnS Hub: Real-time Data Logging, Connecting Field Sensors to Google Sheets (ScholarsArchive@OSU)

ScholarsArchive@OSU: OPEnS Hub: Real-time Data Logging, Connecting Field Sensors to Google Sheets. “In Earth science, we must often collect data from sensors installed in remote locations. Retrieving these data and storing them can be challenging. Present options include proprietary commercial dataloggers, communication devices, and protocols with rigid software and data structures that may require ongoing expenses. While there are open-source solutions that include telemetry, such as EnviroDIY’s Mayfly, none presently generate real-time, remotely accessible workbooks (EnviroDIY, 2018). The Openly Published Environmental Sensing (OPEnS) Lab developed the OPEnS Hub, a new approach to using low-power, open-source hardware and software to achieve real-time data logging from the field to the web.”

Using Social Media and Remote Sensors To Detect Flooding

Interesting: using social media and remote sensors to detect flooding. “Twitter and Flickr, along with remote sensor data, can be used to identify flooded areas, a team of university researchers say. It’s faster than using publicly available satellite images on their own. That imaging can sometimes take days to become available, the researchers say. It’s also easier to identify the flooded streets.”