Invitation to participate in a new project: Help open journals’ deep backfiles (Everybody’s Libraries)

Everybody’s Libraries: Invitation to participate in a new project: Help open journals’ deep backfiles. “Thanks to IMLS-supported work we did at Penn, we’ve produced a complete inventory of serials from the first half of the 20th century that still have active copyright renewals associated with them. And I’ve noted that there was far more serial material without active copyright, as late as the 1960s or even later. We’ve also produced a guide to determining whether particular serial content you may be interested in is in the public domain. Now that we’ve spent a lot of time surveying what is still in copyright though, it’s worth turning more focused attention to serial content that isn’t in copyright, but still of interest to researchers. “

Everybody’s Library Questions: Newspaper copyrights, notices, and renewals (Everybody’s Library)

Everybody’s Libraries: Everybody’s Library Questions: Newspaper copyrights, notices, and renewals. “Because I blog about copyrights for serials, I occasionally get questions in comments to my posts about determining what exactly is copyrighted in those serials. I’ve been slow to answer them in the comments threads, partly because some of them get a bit complicated to answer there. So instead, I’ll answer them in posts of their own, so I can spend a bit more time on them, and so that others can more easily make their own comments.”

Everybody’s Libraries: More and better copyright data online for serials and books

Everybody’s Libraries: More and better copyright data online for serials and books. “It’s getting easier over time to find and use data on copyrights, and thereby to find and make use of materials in the public domain. Here’s a quick update on what’s new and what’s coming, in my projects and elsewhere.”

Everybody’s Libraries: Announcing a draft guide for identifying public domain serial content

Everybody’s Libraries: Announcing a draft guide for identifying public domain serial content. “Back in June, I announced that we had completed an inventory of all serials with active copyright renewals made through 1977, based on listings in the Copyright Office’s Catalog of Copyright Entries. At the time, I said we’d also be releasing a draft of suggested procedures for using the information there, along with other data, to quickly identify and check public domain serial content. (If you’ve been following the Public Domain Day advent calendar I’ve been publishing this month, you’ll have seen the inventory or its records mentioned in some recent entries.) It took a little longer than I’d hoped, but after having some librarians and IP experts have a look at it, I’m pleased to announce that the draft of ‘Determining copyright status of serial issues’ is open for public comment.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Offers Unprecedented Access to North Korean Serial Collection

This was announced in early July and yet I completely missed it until yesterday. Library of Congress: Library of Congress Offers Unprecedented Access to North Korean Serial Collection. “Home to one of the most prominent North Korean collections in the Western Hemisphere, the Asian Division at the Library of Congress has rolled out the North Korean Serials Database, an online indexing tool that offers researchers enhanced access to periodicals and articles published as far back as the 1940s.”

Everybody’s Libraries: New IMLS-funded project: Opening access to 20th century public domain serials

Everybody’s Libraries: New IMLS-funded project: Opening access to 20th century public domain serials . “I’m happy to report that over the next year, I and others at Penn will be working on a project that the Institute of Museum and Library Services has just funded to help open access to the vast public domain of 20th century serials. We’ll be developing and demonstrating data sets and procedures to make it much easier to verify public domain status for content in scholarly journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and special interest periodicals published in the United States.”