New York Times: Stamping Out Online Sex Trafficking May Have Pushed It Underground

New York Times: Stamping Out Online Sex Trafficking May Have Pushed It Underground. “To combat the ills of the internet, federal lawmakers have increasingly focused on a decades-old law that shields tech companies like Facebook and YouTube from liability for content posted by their users. Last year, lawmakers approved chipping away at the law, voting overwhelmingly for the Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act, which holds tech platforms accountable when people use their sites for sex-trafficking schemes…. But now, as the real-world effects of the sex-trafficking change take hold, some experts and politicians say the results are not all positive.”

New York Times: Sex Trafficking via Facebook Sets Off a Lawyer’s Novel Crusade

New York Times: Sex Trafficking via Facebook Sets Off a Lawyer’s Novel Crusade. “Tech has led to a lot of trouble lately: hate speech, financial scams, undermined elections. Yet tech companies have largely avoided legal consequences, thanks to a landmark 1996 law that protects them from lawsuits. Now that federal law, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, has a new threat: Annie McAdams, a personal-injury lawyer in Houston.”

OneZero: How Artificial Intelligence Is Tracking Sex Traffickers

OneZero: How Artificial Intelligence Is Tracking Sex Traffickers. “Traffic Jam is part of a cluster of new tech tools bringing machine learning and artificial intelligence to the fight against sex trafficking, a battle that over the nearly 20 years since the Trafficking Victims Protection Act was signed into law has been stuck in a weary stalemate.”

The Verge: Sex trafficking bill is turning into a proxy war over Google

I have been seeing more and more mentions in my Google Alerts of SESTA, and I didn’t have a good grip on what it was so I went looking for an explanation. I feel a little more educated after reading this article from The Verge. “Since the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act of 2017 was introduced in the Senate in August, tech companies and advocacy groups have been mobilizing in a battle to control its message. Digital rights organizations like the Electronic Frontier Foundation have called it ‘disastrous for free speech online,’ asking its members to call their representatives in Congress. Meanwhile, supporters of the bill have emerged from unlikely quarters — including tech giant Oracle and Hollywood studio 21st Century Fox — and are using the legislation as an opportunity to take shots at Google.”