ProPublica: We’ve Gotten a Lot of Questions About Our Database of Credibly Accused Priests. Here Are the Answers.

ProPublica: We’ve Gotten a Lot of Questions About Our Database of Credibly Accused Priests. Here Are the Answers.. “We published a database in January of Catholic clergy who have been deemed ‘credibly accused’ of sexual abuse or misconduct by nearly 180 dioceses and religious orders around the country. Since then, hundreds of thousands of people have searched the database. A number of those people have reached out with questions about the project. Many have shared personal stories as survivors of abuse. And although the officially released lists total more than 5,800 unique names, dozens of people have written in to suggest names of clergy who they believe have been left off. We’re glad to hear from readers, and we wanted to provide answers to several of the most common questions we’ve received.”

ProPublica: We Assembled the Only Nationwide Database of Priests Deemed Credibly Accused of Abuse. Here’s How.

ProPublica: We Assembled the Only Nationwide Database of Priests Deemed Credibly Accused of Abuse. Here’s How. . “ProPublica published an interactive database on Tuesday that lets users search for clergy who have been listed as credibly accused of sexual abuse in reports released by Catholic dioceses and religious orders. It is, as of publication, the only nationwide database of official disclosures. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the religious leaders’ national membership organization, does not publicly release any centralized, countrywide collection of clergy members who have been credibly accused of sexual assault.”

Sojourners: Why Social Media Is a Last Resort for Survivors of Clergy Abuse

Sojourners: Why Social Media Is a Last Resort for Survivors of Clergy Abuse. “Mainstream media has played a crucial role in giving voice to survivors. As Christine Parker pointed out in a recent interview with Robert Downen: ‘Church leaders aren’t listening to survivors until the media tells their story for them.’ The rise of social media in the past decade has provided an additional — and no less significant — outlet for #ChurchToo survivors to tell their stories, though not without great cost.”

Alphabet’s legal chief David Drummond is leaving the company: Reports (CNBC)

CNBC: Alphabet’s legal chief David Drummond is leaving the company: Reports. “Former senior contracts manager Jennifer Blakely published about her relationship with Drummond last summer, alleging he broke company rules by having multiple affairs — some with other employees— and says he neglected her and their son, withholding contact for long periods of time. Days later, Drummond married a 37-year-old current legal employee he had been dating named Corinne Dixon.”

Chicago Daily Herald: Board of Google parent investigating sexual misconduct cases

Chicago Daily Herald: Board of Google parent investigating sexual misconduct cases. “In response to shareholder lawsuits, the board at Google parent Alphabet is investigating claims of sexual misconduct made against executives and how the company handled them. CNBC first reported Wednesday that the company has hired an outside firm to examine how its executives handled sexual misconduct allegations.”

UTSA Today: New grant-funded educator misconduct database to aid in research and prevention

UTSA Today: New grant-funded educator misconduct database to aid in research and prevention . “David Thompson, a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in the UTSA College of Education and Human Development, and Catherine Robert ’17, Ed.D, an assistant professor of educational leadership and policy studies at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA), are developing a database with information about Texas certified educators who have engaged in sexual misconduct during the last two decades (1999-2019) to provide empirical data on educator sexual misconduct (ESM) that can inform education policymakers at the national and state levels.”

Ars Technica: YouTube will disable comments on most videos of kids because of pedophiles

Ars Technica: YouTube will disable comments on most videos of kids because of pedophiles. “YouTube will now take stronger action to prevent predatory comments posted on videos of children. According to a blog post, YouTube will suspend comments on videos that feature minors that ‘could be at risk of attracting predatory behavior.’ This measure is designed to prevent predatory commenters from gathering in the comments section of such videos.”