Tubefilter: Dozens of YouTubers, Twitch Streamers, And Gaming Executives Face Sexual Abuse Allegations

Tubefilter: Dozens of YouTubers, Twitch Streamers, And Gaming Executives Face Sexual Abuse Allegations. “The wave of claims appears to have been sparked on June 19 by several women speaking up about uncomfortable sexual interactions with streamer SayNoToRage, who has 173K followers on Twitch and commonly streams first-person shooter Destiny. One fellow gaming streamer, JewelsVerne (4.4K), accused him of keeping his hand on her thigh under the table during a group card game, and another, SarahDanielsTV (50.7K), said she was ‘cornered’ by him and ‘made uncomfortable enough to have blocked one particular incident out of my memory.'”

Coronavirus: Teachers in Singapore stop using Zoom after ‘lewd’ incidents (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Teachers in Singapore stop using Zoom after ‘lewd’ incidents. “Singapore has suspended the use of video-conferencing tool Zoom by its teachers, after a ‘very serious incident’ during a home-based lesson. Singapore closed its schools on Wednesday in response to a rising number of coronavirus cases. But one mother told local media that, during her daughter’s geography lesson, obscene images appeared on screen, before two men asked girls to ‘flash’.”

ProPublica: We’ve Gotten a Lot of Questions About Our Database of Credibly Accused Priests. Here Are the Answers.

ProPublica: We’ve Gotten a Lot of Questions About Our Database of Credibly Accused Priests. Here Are the Answers.. “We published a database in January of Catholic clergy who have been deemed ‘credibly accused’ of sexual abuse or misconduct by nearly 180 dioceses and religious orders around the country. Since then, hundreds of thousands of people have searched the database. A number of those people have reached out with questions about the project. Many have shared personal stories as survivors of abuse. And although the officially released lists total more than 5,800 unique names, dozens of people have written in to suggest names of clergy who they believe have been left off. We’re glad to hear from readers, and we wanted to provide answers to several of the most common questions we’ve received.”

ProPublica: We Assembled the Only Nationwide Database of Priests Deemed Credibly Accused of Abuse. Here’s How.

ProPublica: We Assembled the Only Nationwide Database of Priests Deemed Credibly Accused of Abuse. Here’s How. . “ProPublica published an interactive database on Tuesday that lets users search for clergy who have been listed as credibly accused of sexual abuse in reports released by Catholic dioceses and religious orders. It is, as of publication, the only nationwide database of official disclosures. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the religious leaders’ national membership organization, does not publicly release any centralized, countrywide collection of clergy members who have been credibly accused of sexual assault.”

Sojourners: Why Social Media Is a Last Resort for Survivors of Clergy Abuse

Sojourners: Why Social Media Is a Last Resort for Survivors of Clergy Abuse. “Mainstream media has played a crucial role in giving voice to survivors. As Christine Parker pointed out in a recent interview with Robert Downen: ‘Church leaders aren’t listening to survivors until the media tells their story for them.’ The rise of social media in the past decade has provided an additional — and no less significant — outlet for #ChurchToo survivors to tell their stories, though not without great cost.”

Alphabet’s legal chief David Drummond is leaving the company: Reports (CNBC)

CNBC: Alphabet’s legal chief David Drummond is leaving the company: Reports. “Former senior contracts manager Jennifer Blakely published about her relationship with Drummond last summer, alleging he broke company rules by having multiple affairs — some with other employees— and says he neglected her and their son, withholding contact for long periods of time. Days later, Drummond married a 37-year-old current legal employee he had been dating named Corinne Dixon.”

Chicago Daily Herald: Board of Google parent investigating sexual misconduct cases

Chicago Daily Herald: Board of Google parent investigating sexual misconduct cases. “In response to shareholder lawsuits, the board at Google parent Alphabet is investigating claims of sexual misconduct made against executives and how the company handled them. CNBC first reported Wednesday that the company has hired an outside firm to examine how its executives handled sexual misconduct allegations.”

UTSA Today: New grant-funded educator misconduct database to aid in research and prevention

UTSA Today: New grant-funded educator misconduct database to aid in research and prevention . “David Thompson, a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in the UTSA College of Education and Human Development, and Catherine Robert ’17, Ed.D, an assistant professor of educational leadership and policy studies at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA), are developing a database with information about Texas certified educators who have engaged in sexual misconduct during the last two decades (1999-2019) to provide empirical data on educator sexual misconduct (ESM) that can inform education policymakers at the national and state levels.”

Ars Technica: YouTube will disable comments on most videos of kids because of pedophiles

Ars Technica: YouTube will disable comments on most videos of kids because of pedophiles. “YouTube will now take stronger action to prevent predatory comments posted on videos of children. According to a blog post, YouTube will suspend comments on videos that feature minors that ‘could be at risk of attracting predatory behavior.’ This measure is designed to prevent predatory commenters from gathering in the comments section of such videos.”

20 years, 700 victims: Southern Baptist sexual abuse spreads as leaders resist reforms (Houston Chronicle)

Houston Chronicle: 20 years, 700 victims: Southern Baptist sexual abuse spreads as leaders resist reforms. “In all, since 1998, roughly 380 Southern Baptist church leaders and volunteers have faced allegations of sexual misconduct, the newspapers found. That includes those who were convicted, credibly accused and successfully sued, and those who confessed or resigned. More of them worked in Texas than in any other state.”

Houston Chronicle: How to find Catholic priests ‘credibly accused’ of abuse in Texas

Houston Chronicle: How to find Catholic priests ‘credibly accused’ of abuse in Texas. “Dioceses across Texas on Jan. 31 released the names of Catholic priests who were ‘credibly accused’ of child sex abuse since the 1950s in the state. This data is based on the information provided by the dioceses. Because people may have served in multiple dioceses, an individual may show up multiple times in this data.”

Daily Beast: New Website Plans to Collect #MeToo Victims’ Data and Sell It

Daily Beast: New Website Plans to Collect #MeToo Victims’ Data and Sell It. “A California couple have launched an online tool to connect victims of workplace sexual misconduct to others harassed or abused by the same person—and they plan to fund it by anonymizing the data they collect and selling it to the accusers’ companies.” Considering how many studies have been done on the difficulty of completely anonymizing data, this seems like a bad idea…

PR Newswire: Nationally-recognized Attorney Launches Comprehensive Database of Clergy Accused of Sexual Misconduct in the Diocese of Scranton (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Nationally-recognized Attorney Launches Comprehensive Database of Clergy Accused of Sexual Misconduct in the Diocese of Scranton (PRESS RELEASE). “Adam Horowitz, a nationally-recognized advocate for survivors of clergy sexual abuse, announces the launch of a new database of clergy and lay employees accused of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Scranton. The database, which includes 79 priests, 1 nun, and 5 lay employees as of today, is believed to be the most comprehensive list of accused offenders available. For the benefit of survivors and journalists alike, Horowitz and his team have painstakingly prepared individual profiles on dozens of accused offenders to consolidate available information about their backgrounds, alleged crimes, and, in the case of offenders who are still alive, their current locations.”

New York Times: How Google Protected Andy Rubin, the ‘Father of Android’

New York Times: How Google Protected Andy Rubin, the ‘Father of Android’. “Google gave Andy Rubin, the creator of Android mobile software, a hero’s farewell when he left the company in October 2014. ‘I want to wish Andy all the best with what’s next,” Larry Page, Google’s chief executive then, said in a public statement. “With Android he created something truly remarkable — with a billion-plus happy users.’ What Google did not make public was that an employee had accused Mr. Rubin of sexual misconduct.”