Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton

Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton. “It is well known that Shakespeare was a huge influence on Milton. From learning how to write nature poetry to creating charismatic villains, Milton’s debt to his forebear continues to fascinate experts. The younger poet once praised the ‘wonder and astonishment’ that this ‘great heir of fame’ conjured up in his readers. But now, Jason Scott-Warren from Cambridge’s English Faculty believes he has identified even more tangible evidence of this connection.”

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?. “Some stories are too good to forget. With almost formulaic accuracy, elements from classic narratives are constantly being reused and retained in our cultural consciousness, to the extent that a room of people who’ve never read Romeo and Juliet could probably still piece out its major plot points. But when stories are so pervasive, how can we tell what’s original and what’s Shakespeare with a facelift? This summer, three Duke undergraduate students in the Data+ summer research program built a computer program to find reused stories.”

Illinois State University: Historic Illinois Shakespeare Festival programs now online

Illinois State University: Historic Illinois Shakespeare Festival programs now online. “In early 2019, ISU’s Milner Library and the ISU College of Fine Arts partnered to digitize copies of the Festival’s program booklets and post them online using ISU ReD, the University’s institutional repository. Theatre researchers and enthusiasts can now explore these programs going back to 1980, the Festival’s third season, from anywhere in the world.”

Shakespeare’s Globe Archive: Theatres, Players & Performance Now Published Online (Shakespeare’s Globe)

Shakespeare’s Globe: Shakespeare’s Globe Archive: Theatres, Players & Performance Now Published Online (this link is to a PDF document). “Archives from the world-renowned Shakespeare’s Globe are now available online, as part of a collaboration with award-winning primary source publisher, Adam Matthew Digital. The archival materials in this collection offer a comprehensive insight into Sam Wanamaker’s dream reconstruction of the original 1599 Globe Theatre, as well as detailing the way in which this unique space was constructed as part of a radical theatrical experiment through which to examine the plays of William Shakespeare and others. “

Understanding Great Works: a new research tool on JSTOR (JSTOR)

JSTOR: Understanding Great Works: a new research tool on JSTOR. “Understanding Great Works (Beta) is a free research tool from JSTOR Labs that fosters student engagement with classic literature by connecting passages in primary texts with journal articles and book chapters on JSTOR that cite those lines. Building on the success of the Understanding Shakespeare tool, Understanding Great Works encompasses several key works of British literature such as Frankenstein and Pride and Prejudice, the King James Bible, as well as all Shakespeare sonnets and plays.”

Bucknell University: Bucknell To Help Bring Pre-Shakespearean London To Life With New Grant

Bucknell University: Bucknell To Help Bring Pre-Shakespearean London To Life With New Grant. “According to Diane Jakacki, digital scholarship coordinator and faculty teaching associate in comparative humanities, the funding will enable the project to compile and publish thousands of performance-related archival materials that span 500 years of London history. Jakacki, who serves as the project’s principal investigator, said the materials include playscripts, legal and religious records, and personal and diplomatic correspondence.”

iNews: Royal Shakespeare Company opens archive of 3,000 show photos to public

iNews: Royal Shakespeare Company opens archive of 3,000 show photos to public. “Photos spanning more than 80 years of Royal Shakespeare Company productions are being made available for the public to view for the first time. The online library includes 3,000 images from the company’s Stratford-upon-Avon and London theatres, dating from 1936 to the present.”