British Library: Shakespeare’s only surviving playscript now online

British Library: Shakespeare’s only surviving playscript now online. “One of the most iconic literary manuscripts by one of the world’s most famous playwrights, William Shakespeare (1564–1616), can now be viewed in full online on the British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts site. The Booke of Sir Thomas Moore does not immediately spring to mind as among Shakespeare’s masterpieces. This late 16th or early 17th-century play is not always included among the Shakespearean canon, and it was not until the 1800s that it was even associated with the Bard of Avon. So what is the connection with William Shakespeare, the author of the more distinguished Hamlet, Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet?”

Penn Today: What do ‘Bohemian Rhapsody,’ ‘Macbeth,’ and a list of Facebook friends all have in common?

Penn Today: What do ‘Bohemian Rhapsody,’ ‘Macbeth,’ and a list of Facebook friends all have in common?. “To an English scholar or avid reader, the Shakespeare Canon represents some of the greatest literary works of the English language. To a network scientist, Shakespeare’s 37 plays and the 884,421 words they contain also represent a massively complex communication network. Network scientists, who employ math, physics, and computer science to study vast and interconnected systems, are tasked with using statistically rigorous approaches to understand how complex networks, like all of Shakespeare, convey information to the human brain.”

Loyola Marymount University: LMU’s Shakespeare on the Bluff Summer Festival Goes Virtual on YouTube Live

Loyola Marymount University: LMU’s Shakespeare on the Bluff Summer Festival Goes Virtual on YouTube Live. “This summer, Shakespeare on the Bluff festival-goers will trade lawn chairs and picnic blankets for a comfortable spot at home in front of their computer screens. They’ll watch via YouTube Live as a company of 27 actors and actresses and seven technicians – LMU students and alumni from the Class of 2004 to the Class of 2023 – give live, online performances from across the country.”

Towards Data Science: Shakespeare Meets Google’s Flax

Towards Data Science: Shakespeare Meets Google’s Flax. “Google Researcher introduced Flax, a new rising star in Machine Learning, a few months ago. A lot has happened since then and the pre-release has improved tremendously. My own experiments with CNNs on Flax are bearing fruit and I am still amazed about the flexibility compared to Tensorflow. Today I will show you an application of RNNs in Flax: Character-Level Language Model.”

Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton

Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton. “It is well known that Shakespeare was a huge influence on Milton. From learning how to write nature poetry to creating charismatic villains, Milton’s debt to his forebear continues to fascinate experts. The younger poet once praised the ‘wonder and astonishment’ that this ‘great heir of fame’ conjured up in his readers. But now, Jason Scott-Warren from Cambridge’s English Faculty believes he has identified even more tangible evidence of this connection.”

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?. “Some stories are too good to forget. With almost formulaic accuracy, elements from classic narratives are constantly being reused and retained in our cultural consciousness, to the extent that a room of people who’ve never read Romeo and Juliet could probably still piece out its major plot points. But when stories are so pervasive, how can we tell what’s original and what’s Shakespeare with a facelift? This summer, three Duke undergraduate students in the Data+ summer research program built a computer program to find reused stories.”

Illinois State University: Historic Illinois Shakespeare Festival programs now online

Illinois State University: Historic Illinois Shakespeare Festival programs now online. “In early 2019, ISU’s Milner Library and the ISU College of Fine Arts partnered to digitize copies of the Festival’s program booklets and post them online using ISU ReD, the University’s institutional repository. Theatre researchers and enthusiasts can now explore these programs going back to 1980, the Festival’s third season, from anywhere in the world.”

Shakespeare’s Globe Archive: Theatres, Players & Performance Now Published Online (Shakespeare’s Globe)

Shakespeare’s Globe: Shakespeare’s Globe Archive: Theatres, Players & Performance Now Published Online (this link is to a PDF document). “Archives from the world-renowned Shakespeare’s Globe are now available online, as part of a collaboration with award-winning primary source publisher, Adam Matthew Digital. The archival materials in this collection offer a comprehensive insight into Sam Wanamaker’s dream reconstruction of the original 1599 Globe Theatre, as well as detailing the way in which this unique space was constructed as part of a radical theatrical experiment through which to examine the plays of William Shakespeare and others. “

Understanding Great Works: a new research tool on JSTOR (JSTOR)

JSTOR: Understanding Great Works: a new research tool on JSTOR. “Understanding Great Works (Beta) is a free research tool from JSTOR Labs that fosters student engagement with classic literature by connecting passages in primary texts with journal articles and book chapters on JSTOR that cite those lines. Building on the success of the Understanding Shakespeare tool, Understanding Great Works encompasses several key works of British literature such as Frankenstein and Pride and Prejudice, the King James Bible, as well as all Shakespeare sonnets and plays.”

Bucknell University: Bucknell To Help Bring Pre-Shakespearean London To Life With New Grant

Bucknell University: Bucknell To Help Bring Pre-Shakespearean London To Life With New Grant. “According to Diane Jakacki, digital scholarship coordinator and faculty teaching associate in comparative humanities, the funding will enable the project to compile and publish thousands of performance-related archival materials that span 500 years of London history. Jakacki, who serves as the project’s principal investigator, said the materials include playscripts, legal and religious records, and personal and diplomatic correspondence.”

iNews: Royal Shakespeare Company opens archive of 3,000 show photos to public

iNews: Royal Shakespeare Company opens archive of 3,000 show photos to public. “Photos spanning more than 80 years of Royal Shakespeare Company productions are being made available for the public to view for the first time. The online library includes 3,000 images from the company’s Stratford-upon-Avon and London theatres, dating from 1936 to the present.”

LA TImes: Shakespeare died 401 years ago, but original scripts from his era live on in a new digital archive

Los Angeles Times: Shakespeare died 401 years ago, but original scripts from his era live on in a new digital archive. “Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Middleton and Thomas Nashe — despite the best efforts of high school and college English teachers — remain also-rans compared with William Shakespeare, whose fame keeps growing…. On Sunday, the Folger Shakespeare Library — the august institution based in Washington, D.C., that includes a research institute as well as a celebrated theater — will try again to change this. Last year, on the widely celebrated 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, the library offered a digital archive of the playwright’s work. This year, on the 401st, the Folger will open a Digital Anthology of Early English Drama, which makes original scripts and visual images from 40 plays available to anyone with Internet access.” The site is live now.

New Archive of Victorian-Era Illustrated Shakespeare

The blog Cardiff Shakespeare has a quick writeup on a Shakespeare archive called the Victorian Illustrated Shakespeare Archive. I think it’s a longstanding project that was finally launched, but mentions of it have been floating around for a couple years. Either way well-worth looking at. “This is a valuable resource featuring over 3000 illustrations from the four major illustrated editions of Shakespeare’s Complete Works in the Victorian period.”

The British Library and Shakespeare Wallpaper

The British Library and Vodafone are celebrating Shakespeare’s legacy with “digital wallpaper”. “Shakespeare’s plays began to be printed towards the end of the 16th century in pamphlets known as quartos – pocket-sized and competitively priced for the time. …. The plays will be made available using specially designed “digital wallpaper”, in effect a virtual bookshelf at which users can point their smartphones to scan QR codes and activate their downloads.”