Rochester Institute of Technology: RIT/NTID wins coveted prize to create accessible books as part of global reading initiative

Rochester Institute of Technology: RIT/NTID wins coveted prize to create accessible books as part of global reading initiative . “Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf is one of four international innovators selected to create cost-effective packages of high-quality accessible children’s books in languages children use and understand. The initiative, from All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development and the Global Book Alliance’s Begin With Books, enables the prize winners to collectively create thousands of leveled books in seven underserved spoken languages and nine sign languages, serving regions of the world where children have few or no books for preschool or kindergarten.”

Science Bulletin: Interdisciplinary study reveals new insights into the evolution of sign languages

Science Bulletin: Interdisciplinary study reveals new insights into the evolution of sign languages. “A new study, published in Royal Society Open Science, sheds light on the origins and evolution of European sign languages. Using phylogenetic network methods to compare dozens of sign languages, the scholars identify five main European sign language lineages that dispersed to other parts of the world beginning in the late 18th century.”

Tech Xplore: StorySign app converts text in children’s books to sign language

Tech Xplore: StorySign app converts text in children’s books to sign language. “A team of researchers and engineers at Huawei AI has come up with a unique way to help deaf children learn to read sign language—by using AI and augmented reality to interpret printed books. They have also hit on a way to help deaf children develop enjoyment in reading.”

Indigenous Sign Language in Hawaii Considered Endangered

Spoken languages are not the only languages which can become endangered. From Hawaii Public Radio: Hawai‘i Sign Language Still Whispers. “In 2013, scholars and linguists worldwide were stunned by the discovery of a new indigenous language in Hawai‘i. Hawai‘i Sign Language was the first new language discovered in the U.S. since the 1930’s. There are about seven thousand spoken languages in the world, half of which are expected to be lost in the next fifty years. An even more dire fate could await existing sign languages. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on efforts to preserve Hawai‘i Sign and its unique view of the world.”