The Next Web: Honor’s latest app helps the visually impaired read documents and roadsigns

The Next Web: Honor’s latest app helps the visually impaired read documents and roadsigns. “Honor announced PocketVision on Friday at a fringe event to the IFA consumer technology trade show. The app leans on Huawei’s expertise in AI and camera technology to make text easier to consume by those with limited vision.”

KUNR: What’s Happening To Northern Nevada’s Neon?

KUNR: What’s Happening To Northern Nevada’s Neon? . “Will Durham, Executive Director of The Nevada Neon Project, has some 100 signs from Elko to Vegas, Wells to Reno. He watches properties doomed for destruction, and then works with sign companies to safely remove the signs and nabs them before they’re lost. His nonprofit is planning a modern neon museum in Reno, which would bring the signs back to their full brilliance and show them off.” There’s also information in here about a project to preserve the typography of Reno, Nevada.

Ars Technica: How do you preserve beloved New Orleans folk art? A Web font, of course

Ars Technica: How do you preserve beloved New Orleans folk art? A Web font, of course. “Few if any cities value local culture as much as New Orleans, but even the Crescent City has to navigate modern realities of change. And as new residents move in or new businesses replace old ones, some beloved bits of the city’s artistic fabric occasionally need intentional preservation. Case in point: the work of Lester Carey.”

ChuckEgg: Cheap Digital Signage using Google Slides & Raspberry Pi ($40 per display)

ChuckEgg: Cheap Digital Signage using Google Slides & Raspberry Pi ($40 per display) . I know this seems kind of weird for me to include but I would have paid a good stack more than $40 to know about this a few years ago. If you don’t have deep pockets, setting up decent digital displays in a small business is very tough. Librarians, you might want to check this out.

Signs of the Times: Rabbi Michael Strassfeld is spending his retirement collecting signs from shuttered shuls. (Tablet Magazine)

Tablet Magazine: Signs of the Times: Rabbi Michael Strassfeld is spending his retirement collecting signs from shuttered shuls.. “Strassfeld is a retired New York City rabbi and the author of several books on Jewish life, practice, and spirituality, including The Jewish Catalog series, which he co-edited. But these days, racing against time, Strassfeld is on a mission to preserve signs from American synagogues that are closing, renovating, or simply cleaning up. ‘These signs are unique, one or two of a kind,’ explained Strassfeld, who has salvaged more than 300 signs from about 50 synagogues in the Northeast. ‘Once they are lost, they are really lost.'”

Now Available: Digital Library for Graphic Designer Jock Kinneir

Now available: a digital library for graphic designer Jock Kinneir. “Jock was one of the most influential graphic designers of the 20th century, along with his one-time pupil and later business partner Margaret. Jock and Margaret’s signage system became a role model for modern road signage all over the world. … Jock’s grandchildren Simon and Anna Kinneir launched the online repository, which is expected to host a range of teaching briefs, workshops, interviews and biographical details for teachers, students or anyone interested in his life and his user-focused design methods.”

Good E-Reader: Electronic paper revitalizes the museum

Good stuff from Good E-Reader: Electronic paper revitalizes the museum. “As the role of the museum slowly moves from a curator-led to an audience-led experience, the simple paper information card has increasingly been found lacking, contributing to a decrease in paid attendance in museums across the world. In response, museum label-making techniques have begun to change and evolve with the times and with new technology. The ultimate goal of this evolution is simple: an editable, real-time digital label; one that is simply and clearly just a label, but can be updated remotely, in response to certain events.”