Mashable: Ukrainians turned to encrypted messaging app Signal as Russians invaded

Mashable: Ukrainians turned to encrypted messaging app Signal as Russians invaded. “Facing uncertainty, Ukrainians looked for digital security in the form of the end-to-end encrypted messaging app Signal. That’s according to Matthew Prince, the cofounder and CEO of Cloudflare, whose internet infrastructure company gives him unique insight into what goes on behind the internet’s scenes. In a Thursday tweet, Prince wrote that he observed Signal usage in Ukraine shooting up starting just after midnight on Feb. 24.”

TNW: Signal is drama-free for now, but it should prepare for the worst

TNW: Signal is drama-free for now, but it should prepare for the worst. “Between its lack of vested business interests, its promise of end-to-end encryption via the open-source Signal protocol, and the recent changes to WhatsApp’s privacy policy that spooked its user base, Signal is now the new darling of the messaging world. The trouble is, it doesn’t yet have mechanisms to boot bad actors off its platform, like extremists who may seek to radicalize people by inviting them to private groups just by sharing a link to join.”

New Yorker: Taking Back Our Privacy

New Yorker: Taking Back Our Privacy. “Since Signal was released, it has evolved from a niche tool, touted by the privacy-minded and the paranoid, into a mainstream product recommended by the Wall Street Journal. Activists use Signal to coördinate protests, lovers to conduct affairs, workers to unionize, finance professionals to exchange sensitive information, drug dealers to contact customers, journalists to communicate with sources.”

TIME: The Inside Story of How Signal Became the Private Messaging App for an Age of Fear and Distrust

TIME: The Inside Story of How Signal Became the Private Messaging App for an Age of Fear and Distrust. “Signal is an end-to-end encrypted messaging service, similar to WhatsApp or iMessage, but owned and operated by a non-profit foundation rather than a corporation, and with more wide-ranging security protections. One of the first things you see when you visit its website is a 2015 quote from the NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden: ‘I use Signal every day.’ Now, it’s clear that increasing numbers of ordinary people are using it too.”

Ars Technica: Signal is finally bringing its secure messaging to the masses

Ars Technica: Signal is finally bringing its secure messaging to the masses. “[Moxie] Marlinspike has always talked about making encrypted communications easy enough for anyone to use. The difference, today, is that Signal is finally reaching that mass audience it was always been intended for—not just the privacy diehards, activists, and cybersecurity nerds that formed its core user base for years—thanks in part to a concerted effort to make the app more accessible and appealing to the mainstream.”

Engadget: Sports teams are using Signal to duck deflategate-like scandals

Engadget: Sports teams are using Signal to duck deflategate-like scandals. “Facebook isn’t the only company struggling over the prospect of end-to-end encryption in messaging apps, as a report from Yahoo Sports cites examples from ‘every level of sport’ turning to encrypted messaging. While Whatsapp and iMessage provide encrypted communications, increasingly the app of choice is turning out to be Signal, which not only protects their message from MITM spying, but can also auto-delete them based on rules.”

Engadget: Signal says it can’t allow government access to users’ chats

Engadget: Signal says it can’t allow government access to users’ chats. “Last week, the Australian government passed the country’s controversial Access and Assistance Bill 2018 into law, legislation that allows government agencies to demand access to encrypted communications. Companies that don’t comply with the new law could face fines of up to AU$10 million ($7.3 million). A number of companies that stand to be affected have spoken out about the legislation, and Signal has now joined in, explaining that it won’t be able to fulfill such requests if asked.”