Australian Associated Press: High Court rules Google not a publisher

Australian Associated Press: High Court rules Google not a publisher. “Australia’s highest court has ruled Google is not legally responsible for defamatory news articles as it is not the publisher of such content. A majority of High Court justices on Wednesday found Google was not the publisher of a defamatory article by The Age about a Victorian lawyer, as it was a search engine that only provided hyperlinks to news stories.”

Poynter: Australia’s news media bargaining code pries $140 million from Google and Facebook

Poynter: Australia’s news media bargaining code pries $140 million from Google and Facebook. “More than a year after Australian political parties across the spectrum united around a law that pushed Google and Facebook to pay for the news they distribute, a further 24 smaller media outlets will now receive money from Google. This means that Google has made deals with essentially all qualifying media companies. These deals, and those struck with Facebook, have injected well over $200 million AUD into Australian journalism each year according to Rod Sims, the former chair of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission who initiated the Code.”

CNN: How Google found itself under pressure from all sides after Roe’s demise

CNN: How Google found itself under pressure from all sides after Roe’s demise. “In mid-June, one week before the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, more than 20 Congressional Democrats wrote a letter to Google CEO Sundar Pichai. In it, they urged the company to prevent searches for abortion clinics from returning results and ads that direct users to facilities that actually oppose the procedure, noting it could put women’s health at risk. The next month, 17 Republican attorneys general wrote a letter to Pichai pushing for the opposite.”

Ars Technica: FTC aims to counter the “massive scale” of online data collection

Ars Technica: FTC aims to counter the “massive scale” of online data collection. “The Federal Trade Commission has kicked off the rulemaking process for privacy regulations that could restrict online surveillance and punish bad data-security practices. It’s a move that some privacy advocates say is long overdue, as similar Congressional efforts face endless uncertainty.”

NSW Government (Australia): National defamation reform for search engines and social media opens for comment

NSW Government (Australia): National defamation reform for search engines and social media opens for comment. “Australians are invited to have their say on new proposals released today to modernise national defamation law for search engines and social media sites. NSW Attorney General Mark Speakman said the reforms, led by NSW, focus on the extent to which internet intermediaries should be liable for reputation-damaging material published by third party users online.”

The Conversation: Minor Google Meltdown Exposes The World’s Utter Reliance on a Single Tech Company

The Conversation: Minor Google Meltdown Exposes The World’s Utter Reliance on a Single Tech Company. “There are few things we completely rely upon in our modern lives, but for many people, Google is one. Its brief disappearance from the internet felt, for many, like an almost-apocalyptic moment – underscoring how deeply ‘googling’ has been integrated into our lives.”

PC Magazine: South Korea Will Investigate Google, Apple Over In-App Payments (Again)

PC Magazine: South Korea Will Investigate Google, Apple Over In-App Payments (Again). “South Korea will once again investigate Google and Apple over their in-app payment policies. The Korea Communications Commission (KCC) says it’s launching an investigation into the companies—as well as the One Store marketplace that recently expanded(Opens in a new window) beyond South Korea—to ‘identify violations of prohibited acts by app market operators” within the country.’”

Ars Technica: Twitter says Musk’s spam analysis used tool that called his own account a bot

Ars Technica: Twitter says Musk’s spam analysis used tool that called his own account a bot. “Twitter yesterday slammed Elon Musk’s response to the company’s lawsuit in a 127-page filing in the Delaware Court of Chancery that says Musk’s claims are “contradicted by the evidence and common sense.” Twitter’s court filing also said Musk’s spam analysis relied on a tool that once called his own Twitter account a likely bot.”

Brookings Institution: EU Code of Practice on Disinformation

Brookings Institution: EU Code of Practice on Disinformation. “As platform signatories continue to grow their products and services, and disinformation continues to evolve, the larger question is whether cooperation between the private sector and the European Commission will make a meaningful difference against the spread of disinformation online. Ultimately, the EC will have to assess whether companies are significantly improving under self-regulatory codes, or if stricter legislative frameworks like the DSA are needed in the future.”

CNN: Elon Musk’s legal team has publicly filed its official response to Twitter’s lawsuit

CNN: Elon Musk’s legal team has publicly filed its official response to Twitter’s lawsuit. “Elon Musk’s legal team on Friday made public its official response to Twitter’s lawsuit attempting to force him to complete their $44 billion acquisition deal. In the answer to Twitter’s complaint, which includes counter-claims against the company, Musk’s team attempts to refute the company’s allegations that the Tesla CEO is unjustly trying to exit the deal.”