TechCrunch: Google News launches a new desktop design with topic customization

TechCrunch: Google News launches a new desktop design with topic customization. “Google News is refreshing its desktop site with a new design that allows you to track global and local news on one screen. The redesign puts Your Briefing, Local news, and Top Picks section on a single page in different columns so it’s easier to catch up with news on topics and regions you care about.”

Mashable: A massive Facebook redesign just went live for me, and it’s…not great

Mashable: A massive Facebook redesign just went live for me, and it’s…not great. “It’s been almost exactly two years since Facebook launched its last major redesign, which included a big change in the site’s navigation, a cleaner look (with nearly none of the company’s favoured blue color to be seen), as well as the optional dark mode. It was a major change, and it took some getting used to, but it was a much-needed overhaul of the over-cluttered Facebook of old. This new change is disorienting.”

Ars Technica: Google.com tests a busier homepage with a row of info cards

Ars Technica: Google.com tests a busier homepage with a row of info cards. “Check out this totally wild Google homepage experiment spotted by 9to5Google: the search page suddenly has a row of cards at the bottom. If this design is widely adopted, it would easily be the biggest google.com design change ever.” Reminds me of the circa-1999 portal pages that Google’s original clean design was a rebuke against. Everything old is new again.

US Homeland Security: Announcing the Launch of the New DHS.gov

US Homeland Security: Announcing the Launch of the New DHS.gov. “Our website’s brand-new look and feel optimizes customer experience to make information about our services readily available, easier to understand, and more efficient to use. To do this, our web team streamlined and revised more than 14,000 pages of content. This new website uses a latest-generation content management system that is faster and more responsive than our previous site.”

Center for Public Integrity: New Public Integrity website puts spotlight on inequality

Center for Public Integrity: New Public Integrity website puts spotlight on inequality. “The Center for Public Integrity has a new website, redesigned to further our mission of using investigative journalism to confront inequality in the U.S., showcase audio storytelling and multimedia in addition to our long-form investigations, and adopt the most up-to-date mobile and accessibility standards.”

ClinicalTrials.gov Modernization Effort: Beta Releases Now Available (NIH)

NIH: ClinicalTrials.gov Modernization Effort: Beta Releases Now Available. “Earlier this year, we provided an update on NLM’s efforts to modernize ClinicalTrials.gov, the world’s largest publicly accessible database of privately and publicly funded clinical trials. NLM released a request for information, hosted public webinars, and adopted a user-centered design approach intended to help ensure that modernization is responsive to user needs.”

Ars Technica: Google Play website gets its first redesign in years, looks like a big app

Ars Technica: Google Play website gets its first redesign in years, looks like a big app. “While the Play Store app on Android devices is continually updated, the website has mostly been forgotten. The current Google Play website design dates back to 2013. The site has had some small tweaks since then, but the bones of the site are still eight years old, and it presents content in a card motif that Google has moved on from. The new website looks just like the Android app. That means lots of whitespace and a layout focused on app icons and video thumbnails.”

NOAA: NOAA upgrades climate website amid growing demand for climate information

NOAA: NOAA upgrades climate website amid growing demand for climate information. “NOAA’s Climate Program Office today launched a newly redesigned version of Climate.gov, NOAA’s award-winning, flagship website that provides the public with clear, timely, and science-based information about climate. The redesign expands the site’s already significant capacity to connect Americans with the resources they need to understand and plan for climate-related risks.”

TechCrunch: Twitter’s web redesign isn’t as accessible as it should be, experts say

TechCrunch: Twitter’s web redesign isn’t as accessible as it should be, experts say. “After teasing its new font in January, Twitter made some major changes to its website and app design this week. But while Twitter framed these updates as making the platform ‘more accessible,’ some accessibility experts say that these changes missed the mark.”

Slate: What’s Really Wrong With the New Twitter Font

Slate: What’s Really Wrong With the New Twitter Font. “On Thursday, Twitter updated the design of its app and website. Some users were baffled by a change to the ‘follow’ and ‘unfollow’ buttons that could lead one to mix them up. Others took issue with the new Twitter font, Chirp. While the social network boasted that Chirp is designed to be more accessible and amplify “the fun and irreverence of a Tweet,” many tweets complained that not only is it harder to read, users are complaining of headaches.”

The Verge: Twitter is changing the contrast of buttons again after complaints of eye strain

The Verge: Twitter is changing the contrast of buttons again after complaints of eye strain. “Twitter is readjusting the contrast on its buttons following feedback about its design updates from earlier this week. Some people have reported eye strain, headaches, and migraines due to the higher visual contrast in the colors of buttons and links, as well as the new font, Chirp.”

Mashable: Twitter’s ‘follow’ button redesign is causing lots of confusion and unfollows

Mashable: Twitter’s ‘follow’ button redesign is causing lots of confusion and unfollows. “In short: the ‘Following’ button is the same color of the apps background, which looks just like how “Follow” button used to look. That means lots of folks have now accidentally unfollowed people they already followed. It’s sort of a muscle-memory mistake because things look different at first glance.”