‘A coward’s palace’: Australian PM slams social media amid defamation law controversy (Reuters)

Reuters: ‘A coward’s palace’: Australian PM slams social media amid defamation law controversy. “Australia’s prime minister lambasted social media on Thursday as ‘a coward’s palace’, saying platforms should be treated as publishers when defamatory comments by unidentified people are posted, pouring fuel on a raging debate over the country’s libel laws.”

New York Times: Google Seeks to Break Vicious Cycle of Online Slander

New York Times: Google Seeks to Break Vicious Cycle of Online Slander. “For many years, the vicious cycle has spun: Websites solicit lurid, unverified complaints about supposed cheaters, sexual predators, deadbeats and scammers. People slander their enemies. The anonymous posts appear high in Google results for the names of victims. Then the websites charge the victims thousands of dollars to take the posts down. This circle of slander has been lucrative for the websites and associated middlemen — and devastating for victims. Now Google is trying to break the loop.”

New York Times: The Slander Industry

New York Times: The Slander Industry. “To get slander removed, many people hire a ‘reputation management’ company. In my case, it was going to cost roughly $20,000. We soon discovered a secret, hidden behind a smokescreen of fake companies and false identities. The people facilitating slander and the self-proclaimed good guys who help remove it are often one and the same.”

Poynter: Fact-checkers personally targeted by partisan attacks

Poynter: Fact-checkers personally targeted by partisan attacks. “Darko Brkan was still living in his parents’ house when he read an article that identified him as the owner of several apartment properties, a man who enjoyed a jetsetting, lavish lifestyle of travel and luxury. This was news to Brkan, the founding president of the media NGO Zašto Ne which hosts the fact-checking platform Raskrinkavanje in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In fact, he read this about himself in the conservative newspaper Avaz while in Capetown, South Africa, attending Global Fact 6 — a trip paid for by the International Fact-Checking Network (IFCN), since he couldn’t have afforded to attend otherwise.”