Library of Congress: Only Known Surviving Muslim American Slave Autobiography Goes Online at the Library of Congress

Library of Congress: Only Known Surviving Muslim American Slave Autobiography Goes Online at the Library of Congress. “The Library of Congress has acquired and made available online the Omar Ibn Said Collection, which includes the only known surviving slave narrative written in Arabic in the United States. In 1831, Omar Ibn Said, a wealthy and highly educated man who was captured in West Africa and brought to the United States as a slave, wrote a 15-page autobiography describing his experiences.”

Phys .org: New data dashboards launched to inform policymaking on modern slavery and child labor

Phys .org: New data dashboards launched to inform policymaking on modern slavery and child labor. “Marking the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, new interactive data dashboards have been launched that visualise trends in forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking, and child labour. For the first time, country-level data visualisations and details on governments’ efforts to address these abuses have been brought together in order to inform evidence-based policymaking.”

Mercer University: Project Aims To Uncover The Untold Stories Of African-Americans In Middle Georgia

Mercer University: Project Aims To Uncover The Untold Stories Of African-americans In Middle Georgia. “A 12-year-old girl named Harriet. A 5-year-old boy named Nathan. They are written into the pages of Bibb County historical deed books, right beside the sale of land and horses. These black children are among more than 400 records of slave transactions that Mercer researchers have discovered so far in just seven volumes. They still have 10 more deed books to go through at the Bibb County Superior Court Clerk’s Office, followed by collections on chattel mortgages, chain gang records and plantation maps. The clerk’s office, Mercer University Library and the Department of Africana Studies have teamed up on an ambitious project to digitize historical documents from 1823 to 1865 related to slavery. They are focusing on Bibb County first but hope to later expand the project to other counties in Middle Georgia.”

Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims (Charleston Chronicle)

Charleston Chronicle: Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims. “The oft-overlooked experiences of the Lowcountry’s African Muslims are the subject of a new digital exhibit now freely available online. The exhibit—formally styled Enslaved and Freed African Muslims: Spiritual Wayfarers in the South and Lowcountry—documents more than three centuries of West African Muslims, from those forcibly brought to the Americas before the War of Independence to adherents of Islam in the Lowcountry today.”

Enslaved People in Eighteenth-century Britain: An Interview with Nelson Mundell (Black Perspectives)

Black Perspectives: Enslaved People in Eighteenth-century Britain: An Interview with Nelson Mundell. “In today’s post, Keisha N. Blain, Senior Editor of Black Perspectives, interviews Nelson Mundell about the new online database, Runaway Slaves in Britain: Bondage, Freedom and Race in the Eighteenth Century. Mundell is a former History teacher with a MEd in Education and is finishing his history PhD thesis, ‘The Runaway Enslaved in Eighteenth-century Britain,’ at the University of Glasgow in Scotland.”

Pacific Standard Magazine: Has Hurricane Florence Destroyed Records Of America’s Slave Trade?

Pacific Standard Magazine: Has Hurricane Florence Destroyed Records Of America’s Slave Trade?. “North Carolina’s archivists are worried that fragile collections of documents, covering centuries of history, could have been destroyed by Hurricane Florence. Forecasters have predicted that the storm could cost up to $60 billion in economic damage, as people lost their homes, cars, and possessions to rainfall and flood water when the hurricane hit the eastern coast of the United States. But it’s harder to place a dollar value on the loss of North Carolina’s historic archives, which trace, among other things, the history of the slave trade and, later, Southern systems of racial segregation.”