Globe and Mail: Hands-on projects lead to major discoveries

Globe and Mail: Hands-on projects lead to major discoveries. “In the spring of 2018, approximately 20 students from Académie Ste-Cécile International School in Windsor, Ont., crouched low in a farmer’s field with crayons and paper in hand. But rather than drawing the surrounding landscape, the Grade 11 and 12 students were busy recording local history – one gravestone at a time…. While some of the county’s 18 known black cemeteries are still cared for by local churches or the government, others are abandoned, nearly invisible. That class trip for geography and history students launched what would eventually garner them ample media attention and an esteemed Lieutenant Governor’s Ontario Heritage Award For Youth Achievement.”

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford. “The graves of hundreds of African Americans and Native Americans lie in downtown Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, but without headstones they remain invisible. Excluded from official records or referred to only by race, their stories remain as hidden as their graves. Four centuries after enslaved people were first brought to America, a new project organized by the Ancient Burying Ground Association investigates hundreds of these untold stories. ‘Uncovering Their History’ shares the stories of colonists of color: an enslaved couple given away as a wedding present, black men who joined the Continental Navy in hopes of obtaining their freedom, Native American doctors and servants.”

Virginia Untold: Lancaster County Fiduciary Records 1657-1872 (Out of the Box)

Out of the Box: Virginia Untold: Lancaster County Fiduciary Records 1657-1872. “The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce the addition of the Lancaster County Fiduciary Records, 1657-1872, to Virginia Untold. This collection contains the earliest records added to Virginia Untold, and the largest number of names added from a single locality so far—over 20,000. Fiduciary records primarily consist of estate administrator settlements, estate inventories, dower allotments, estate divisions, estate sales, and guardian accounts that record a detailed list of all personal property owned by individuals, including enslaved people.”

Washington Post: Two women lead a free tour of Charlottesville’s Confederate monuments each month. A new website lets everyone listen.

Washington Post: Two women lead a free tour of Charlottesville’s Confederate monuments each month. A new website lets everyone listen.. “Once a month, the two African American women walk to the former slave auction block in Charlottesville. They stand before a crowd that often numbers in the dozens. University of Virginia professor Jalane Schmidt gestures toward the ground, pointing out a small concrete marker, flush with the brick sidewalk, that declares: ‘On this site, slaves were bought and sold.’ Beside her, Andrea Douglas, executive director of the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, clears her throat. ith that, the tour — which will stretch for roughly 90 minutes and take attendees through the history and legacy of Charlottesville’s embattled Confederate monuments — begins.”

‘People Not Property’: New website explores history of slavery in the region (Lohud)

Lohud: ‘People Not Property’: New website explores history of slavery in the region. “The nonprofit educational group Historic Hudson Valley wants New Yorkers to know that slavery was not confined to the South. The group has launched ‘People Not Property,’ a new interactive documentary website that explains the history of slavery in the Northeast, including the Hudson Valley, using stories, videos, and re-enactments.”

EurekAlert: 3D slave ship model brings a harrowing story to life

EurekAlert: 3D slave ship model brings a harrowing story to life. “A 3D model of an 18th century slave ship, which captures the cramped, dirty and stifling conditions experienced by enslaved Africans, has been launched as a new digital teaching tool.”

New: Omar Bin Said Story Map (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New: Omar Bin Said Story Map. “When the Library’s Omar Ibn Said Collection was put online earlier this year, the multi-national, multi-lingual story presented a challenge: How best to tell Said’s incredible journey? Born into wealth in an area known as Futa Toro (in modern-day Senegal) around 1770, he was an educated and respected man in his early 30s, a devout Muslim, when he was taken prisoner during a regional conflict and sold into slavery. He survived the middle passage in chains, was enslaved on a South Carolina plantation, escaped, but was recaptured in North Carolina. His eventual owners, a politically prominent family, treated him as a special case. He spent his last years as a well-regarded curiosity, often in touch with scholars. He died in 1863, still enslaved, during the Civil War.”