EurekAlert: $1.4 million Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant expands Enslaved.org research

EurekAlert: $1.4 million Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant expands Enslaved.org research. “The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded $1.4 million to Michigan State University for Enslaved: Peoples of the Historical Slave Trade, or Enslaved.org, a first-of-its-kind database containing millions of records cataloging the lives of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Enslaved.org, developed and maintained by MSU researchers, links data collections from multiple universities, archives, museums and family history centers.”

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries . “Struggles for Liberty takes its name from the phrase ‘struggles in the cause of liberty’, written by Lewis Henry Douglass (eldest son of Frederick Douglass) of his mother, Anna Murray Douglass’s tireless, heroic antislavery and social justice activism. The resource is structured by theme: the ‘Story of the Slave’; the History of Black Abolition; the US Civil War; African American activists in Scotland; and the Anna Murray and Frederick Douglass Family. It also includes interactive maps and downloadable learning activities for teachers, including activities mapped to the Curriculum for Excellence.”

Emory News Center: New consortium will ensure future of SlaveVoyages database

Emory News Center: New consortium will ensure future of SlaveVoyages database. “The new consortium, organized by Emory, will function as a cooperative academic collaboration through a contractual agreement among six institutions: Emory, the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture at William & Mary, Rice University, and three campuses at the University of California that will assume a joint membership: UC Santa Cruz, UC Irvine and UC Berkeley. Membership is for a three-year term and is renewable.”

Cavalier Daily: Law School launches new website exploring its connections to slavery

Cavalier Daily: Law School launches new website exploring its connections to slavery. “The University’s Law school launched Slavery and the U.Va. School of Law — a new website and digital archive that explores the law school’s historical connections to slavery — on Feb 1. At the core of this project are digitized versions of law students’ notebooks from the antebellum time period, when slavery was taught as a social good.”

Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana

New-to-me: Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana. “Frederick Baconnais was born during the peak of the sugar cane harvest season at the Evergreen Plantation in Edgard, Louisiana. At 5 a.m. on Dec. 12, 1852, he drew his first breath, according to historic records. His mother, Victorine, a house slave at Evergreen, was 18 years old. He was only two when she died. But Baconnais would name one of his daughters Victoria in remembrance of his mother. Their stories are among several recounted through photos and narratives in Evergreen’s Ancestor Project.”

The Guardian: Dutch exhibition offers new insight into Berbice slave uprising

The Guardian: Dutch exhibition offers new insight into Berbice slave uprising. “The Dutch national archives are showcasing a unique set of letters sent by the leader of the first organised slave revolt on the American continent to a colonial governor, in which the newly free man proposed to share the land. The offer from the man known as Cuffy, from Kofi – meaning ‘born on Friday’ – is said to provide a new insight into attempts to resist the brutal regimes of the colonial period, often overlooked in histories of enslaved people.”

CNN: Every investor in Britain’s slave trade set to be detailed in new ‘dictionary’ after funding from UK government

CNN: Every investor in Britain’s slave trade set to be detailed in new ‘dictionary’ after funding from UK government. “The first ever index of investors in Britain’s extensive slave trade is being compiled by academics, after the project received £1 million ($1.4 million) in funding from the UK government. The Dictionary of British Slave Traders will detail the 6,500 members of society who took part in the trade throughout a period stretching more then two centuries.”

Washington Post: A massive new effort to name millions sold into bondage during the transatlantic slave trade

Washington Post: A massive new effort to name millions sold into bondage during the transatlantic slave trade. “Enslaved: Peoples of the Historic Slave Trade, a free, public clearinghouse that launched Tuesday with seven smaller, searchable databases, will for the first time allow anyone from academic historians to amateur family genealogists to search for individual enslaved people around the globe in one central online location.”

Atlas Obscura: A Rare Day-by-Day Document of Life Aboard a Slave Ship

Atlas Obscura: A Rare Day-by-Day Document of Life Aboard a Slave Ship. “THE TRANS-ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE DATABASE documents more than 36,000 voyages in which enslaved persons were shipped across the Atlantic Ocean…. Despite the overwhelming density of these kinds of records, masking brutality with meticulous documentation, far less survives to describe daily life on these ships, or the experience of being on board. That’s what distinguishes the ‘Journal of the Slave Ship Mary,’ recently acquired by Georgetown University Library in Washington, D.C.”

Liverpool Echo: University of Liverpool accepts slavery roots after new database of links revealed

Liverpool Echo: University of Liverpool accepts slavery roots after new database of links revealed. “The University of Liverpool has acknowledged the role that proceeds of slavery played in its early beginnings as a group of independent researchers prepare to release information about its links to the notorious trade. The database, which has been put together by the Liverpool Black History Research Group based at the Kuumba Imani centre in Toxteth, explores the relationship between prominent slave traders and one of the University of Liverpool’s forerunner organisations, the Liverpool Royal Institution.” The database will be released next year.

Barry & District News: Unique piece of Wales’ Black history goes online

Barry & District News: Unique piece of Wales’ Black history goes online. “An extremely rare piece of Wales’ Black history has been published online for the first time. Published on the city’s Bute Street in 1862, William Hall’s ‘Personal Narrative’ is a shocking and graphic account of his birth into slavery in Tennessee, and his arduous journey to Cardiff. Hall describes being sold to various plantation owners, detailing multiple attempts to escape his captors, as well as his encounters with other escaped slaves.”

Courthouse News: African Ancestry Data Offers Deeper Examination of History of Slavery

Courthouse News: African Ancestry Data Offers Deeper Examination of History of Slavery. “The transatlantic slave trade officially ending in the 19th century, but the effects of that brutal system continue to reverberate in the genes of enslaved people’s ancestors, according to a new study. Pairing genetic data with historical records, researchers at 23andMe can now paint a clearer picture of African ancestry in the New World, detailing the origins of enslaved Africans and the methods used to exploit them after they survived the grueling Middle Passage.”

Harvard Magazine: Bringing Black History to Light

Harvard Magazine: Bringing Black History to Light. “Amid the pandemic, Houghton’s regular digitization projects have been put mostly on hold, and when protests arose after George Floyd’s killing, it sparked a nationwide hunger to understand black history and experiences. Libraries and institutions seemed suddenly keen to support African-American communities. ‘It felt like a great opportunity to increase black representation in our digital collections,’ says [Dorothy] Berry, whose professional background is in African-American-focused archival work. She put together project titled, ‘Slavery, Abolition, Emancipation, and Freedom: Primary Sources from Houghton Library.’ Leading a team of colleagues, she will spend the 2020-21 academic year building out the library’s digital collection of records related to African-American history: thousands of items from the late eighteenth century through the early twentieth.”