Lincoln Journal-Star: UNL project illustrates history of slaves suing for their freedom

Lincoln Journal-Star: UNL project illustrates history of slaves suing for their freedom. “UNL’s Center for Digital Research in the Humanities have compiled and digitized court documents from more than 500 freedom suits and published them in an online database titled ‘O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law and Family,’ through a grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The project focuses on slavery in the 1820s and 1830s, said project manager Kaci Nash, when African-Americans were held as property by a wide strata of Washington society.”

Route Fifty: Finding History Along the Highway

Route Fifty: Finding History Along the Highway. “A one-inch grey pipe stem excavated by Maryland state archeologists doesn’t look like much. But this artifact dug up on a site near a rural stretch of highway eventually led to an important clue about the lives of enslaved people in the state about 200 years ago. DNA found inside the stem was identified as belonging to a woman and linked to people currently living in Sierra Leone—a rare breakthrough in using genetic testing to uncover the history of people divorced from their homelands in West Africa when forced onto slave ships.”

The Iris: Creating a Digital Museum to Memorialize America’s Slave Past

The Iris: Creating a Digital Museum to Memorialize America’s Slave Past. “Scholar James Young once posed this provocative question: How does a nation memorialize a past it might rather forget? Art historian Renée Ater is exploring this question by researching 25 monuments to the slave past located in the South, Midwest, and Northeast of the United States. A 2018 Getty Scholar and an associate professor emerita of the history of art at the University of Maryland, College Park, Ater plans to publish her findings in a forthcoming digital project, Contemporary Monuments to the Slave Past: Race, Memorialization, and Civic Engagement.”

Washington Post: How activists used photography to help end slavery

Washington Post: How activists used photography to help end slavery. “…while social media makes this act of sharing protest imagery seem like a new innovation, it’s actually an organizing tool with roots almost two centuries old. Antebellum abolitionists pioneered the use of photography as a tool for social movements, and in the process, they heightened their sense of solidarity and urgency, exacerbating the political crisis over slavery.”

Quartz: Historians are starting to explore the dark side of science

Quartz: Historians are starting to explore the dark side of science. ” Increasingly, scientific historians are coming to terms with the fact that science thrived in part because of the transatlantic slave trade of the 1500s to 1800s, which enabled naturalists to discover and ship new flora and fauna specimens around the world. To this day, museums contain these specimens that excited and inspired early scientists but were obtained only thanks to an inhumane business.”

PRI: Archivists race to digitize slavery records before the history is lost

PRI: Archivists race to digitize slavery records before the history is lost. “When [Abu] Koroma started at the archives in 2004, Sierra Leone was emerging from civil war. He was fresh out of high school and his parents had died, so he needed the small salary badly. And the archives fascinated Koroma. They date back to the first treaty regional leaders made with British colonists in 1788. After Britain outlawed participation in the slave trade in 1807, British administrators in colonial Sierra Leone filled books with descriptions of each liberated African.”

Announcing the Restore the Ancestors 2019 Project: Help Us Index Records for African American Genealogy (International African American Museum)

International African American Museum: Announcing the Restore the Ancestors 2019 Project: Help Us Index Records for African American Genealogy. “The Center for Family History at the International African American Museum, FamilySearch and BlackProGen Live have announced the launch of Restore the Ancestors 2019, a volunteer community effort to index FamilySearch records of interest for African American genealogy, with a special focus on records for the former slaveholding states.”