Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims (Charleston Chronicle)

Charleston Chronicle: Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims. “The oft-overlooked experiences of the Lowcountry’s African Muslims are the subject of a new digital exhibit now freely available online. The exhibit—formally styled Enslaved and Freed African Muslims: Spiritual Wayfarers in the South and Lowcountry—documents more than three centuries of West African Muslims, from those forcibly brought to the Americas before the War of Independence to adherents of Islam in the Lowcountry today.”

Enslaved People in Eighteenth-century Britain: An Interview with Nelson Mundell (Black Perspectives)

Black Perspectives: Enslaved People in Eighteenth-century Britain: An Interview with Nelson Mundell. “In today’s post, Keisha N. Blain, Senior Editor of Black Perspectives, interviews Nelson Mundell about the new online database, Runaway Slaves in Britain: Bondage, Freedom and Race in the Eighteenth Century. Mundell is a former History teacher with a MEd in Education and is finishing his history PhD thesis, ‘The Runaway Enslaved in Eighteenth-century Britain,’ at the University of Glasgow in Scotland.”

Pacific Standard Magazine: Has Hurricane Florence Destroyed Records Of America’s Slave Trade?

Pacific Standard Magazine: Has Hurricane Florence Destroyed Records Of America’s Slave Trade?. “North Carolina’s archivists are worried that fragile collections of documents, covering centuries of history, could have been destroyed by Hurricane Florence. Forecasters have predicted that the storm could cost up to $60 billion in economic damage, as people lost their homes, cars, and possessions to rainfall and flood water when the hurricane hit the eastern coast of the United States. But it’s harder to place a dollar value on the loss of North Carolina’s historic archives, which trace, among other things, the history of the slave trade and, later, Southern systems of racial segregation.”

Herald-Whig: Jim’s Journey marks fifth year of celebrating black history

Herald-Whig: Jim’s Journey marks fifth year of celebrating black history. “The center now is a repository for photographs, documents, literature and exhibits that highlight the African-American experience in the Hannibal area, a place where slavery flourished for decades until it was finally snuffed out in the wake of the Civil War, only to be followed by years of segregation and discrimination. [Faye] Dant told a crowd at Friday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony that as the Freedom Center’s collection of historic items continues to grow, efforts are under way to reproduce and digitize the center’s exhibits so they can be displayed to the world across the internet.”

Citizen Times: Grant backs project to digitally preserve slave deeds across North Carolina

Citizen Times: Grant backs project to digitally preserve slave deeds across North Carolina. “Just shy of $300,000 was awarded by the National Historic Publications and Records Commission to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro to fund the expansion of a project to digitize nearly 10,000 slave deeds and bills of sale from 26 counties across the state. Once digitized, the records will go into a searchable database accessible to the public.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Museum Ties Portraits of the Wealthy to Their Slaveholding Pasts

Smithsonian Magazine: Museum Ties Portraits of the Wealthy to Their Slaveholding Pasts. “Photography has made it possible for pretty much everyone to sit for a portrait—or at least a selfie. But having your portrait painted by a genuine artist is still an honor reserved for the rich, the powerful or the friends of art students. It was the same in the past—only the wealthy could afford to have their likeness put on canvas, which is why our art museums are full of rich people wearing their finest outfits glaring at us from their good sides. But the Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts is also highlighting the hidden warts, adding signs to its portrait collection illuminating many of the subjects’ deep connections with slavery, reports Maria Garcia at WBUR.”