USA Today: Black genealogists’ surprising findings using Ancestry’s digitized U.S. Freedmen’s records

USA Today: Black genealogists’ surprising findings using Ancestry’s digitized U.S. Freedmen’s records. “In August, Ancestry released what it says is the most extensive and searchable Freedmen’s Bureau records by making available more than 3.5 million documents from the National Archives and Records Administration. Some records date back to 1846. And more than a month since the release, researchers like [Regina] Vaughn are discovering things on Ancestry they say would’ve taken them years, or things they would have never found. The site includes details such as labor contracts, bank records, marriage licenses, schools, and food and clothing for emancipated Black Americans.”

Smithsonian: Smithsonian To Host the Virtual Symposium “The Other Slavery” Sept. 24–27

Smithsonian: Smithsonian To Host the Virtual Symposium “The Other Slavery” Sept. 24–27. “Stories of enslaved Indigenous peoples have often been absent from the historical narrative. From Sept. 24–27, the Smithsonian will host the virtual symposium ‘The Other Slavery: Histories of Indian Bondage from New Spain to the Southwestern United States,’ which will explore the hidden stories of enslaved Indigenous peoples, focusing on the legacy of Spanish colonization in the Americas and Asia and its impact on what is now the southwestern United States. This program seeks to give a comprehensive first voice to these hushed stories and living legacies.”

National Geographic: Dog collar or slave collar? A Dutch museum interrogates a brutal past.

National Geographic: Dog collar or slave collar? A Dutch museum interrogates a brutal past.. “When a finely engraved 17th-century golden collar was donated to the Rijksmuseum, the Netherlands’ national museum in 1881, it was labeled as a dog collar. But a few years ago, when the museum reexamined its collections for its recent exhibition on the Dutch slave trade, curators realized the beautiful object had an ugly past.”

University of Arkansas: NEH Grant Funds Summer Institute on Nelson Hackett’s Flight From Slavery

University of Arkansas: NEH Grant Funds Summer Institute on Nelson Hackett’s Flight From Slavery. “The $170,000 grant will bring 36 K-12 educators from across the nation to the U of A to study the story of Nelson Hackett, an enslaved man who fled both Fayetteville and bondage in 1841. Hackett’s flight set off an international legal battle that ensured Canada remained a haven for those escaping from slavery in the U.S. South….The Nelson Hackett Project is available free online and can be accessed anytime by anyone wishing to become acquainted with this amazing story.”

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Adds New Freedmen’s Bureau Collection that Enables Family History Discoveries for Descendants of Formerly Enslaved People (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Adds New Freedmen’s Bureau Collection that Enables Family History Discoveries for Descendants of Formerly Enslaved People (PRESS RELEASE). “Today, Ancestry® spotlights an important, yet often overlooked, part of American history by unveiling the world’s largest digitized and searchable collection of Freedmen’s Bureau and Freedman’s Bank records. This addition of more than 3.5 million records can help descendants of previously enslaved people in the U.S. learn more about their families. The collection can enable meaningful family history breakthroughs because it is likely the first time newly freed African Americans would appear in records after Emancipation, as many enslaved people were previously excluded from standard census and federal documents.” The collection is free to access.

British Library: The Backstory to Digitising the Barbados Gazette

British Library: The Backstory to Digitising the Barbados Gazette. “Today is the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition. Today also sees the launch of the second crowdsourcing task of the Agents of Enslavement project. To coincide with these two events we are delighted to share this guest post by Dr Lissa Paul, a literary scholar at Brock University who specialises in children’s literature and Caribbean literary studies.”

The Plantation and the Pizza Hut: A Suburban County Reconsiders Its History (Route Fifty)

Route Fifty: The Plantation and the Pizza Hut: A Suburban County Reconsiders Its History. “The United States is in the midst of an awakening about its history, especially when it comes to issues of race. That’s playing out at the national level, in state capitals, at county and municipal government offices, and at sites like Oak Hill and another historic community nearby whose centerpiece was eventually replaced by a Pizza Hut. Fairfax County officials have pledged to add more Black voices to its story. That won’t be easy, and will require a new approach to how its history is researched and interpreted.”

Wake County, North Carolina: Wake County Register of Deeds and Shaw University Collaborate to Complete Enslaved Persons Project

Wake County, North Carolina: Wake County Register of Deeds and Shaw University Collaborate to Complete Enslaved Persons Project. “The Wake County Register of Deeds Office and Shaw University are partnering on a project to unlock the secrets of dozens of property deeds to help better reveal the human stories of slavery in our area. The Enslaved Persons Project is a massive effort to catalog, transcribe and make public the records from more than 30 deed books containing bills of sale and property exchanges to allow hundreds of people to track the history of their families.”

British Library: Help trace the stories of enslaved people in the Caribbean using colonial newspapers

British Library: Help trace the stories of enslaved people in the Caribbean using colonial newspapers . “We are excited to launch a new crowdsourcing project that explores the links between slavery and newspapers in late 18th and early 19th century Barbados: Agents of Enslavement: Colonial newspapers in the Caribbean and hidden genealogies of the enslaved. This project will examine the extent to which newspapers facilitated and challenged the practice of slavery. It will also help to reveal the identities, networks, and acts of resistance of enslaved people hidden within these printed texts.”

University of New Orleans: History Professor Mary Niall Mitchell Collaborates With New Orleans Teachers, Others on Pilot Project Using Freedom on the Move Data

University of New Orleans: History Professor Mary Niall Mitchell Collaborates With New Orleans Teachers, Others on Pilot Project Using Freedom on the Move Data. “University of New Orleans history professor Mary Niall Mitchell is collaborating with New Orleans public school teachers, museum directors and other community leaders to develop a K-12 curriculum using Freedom on the Move’s (FOTM) database of advertisements seeking runaway enslaved people. The digital database, which Mitchell is a lead historian, is the largest digital collection of newspaper advertisements for people escaping from North American slavery. Culled from 18th- and 19th-century U.S. newspapers, the ads, placed by enslavers, are used to document the lives of people escaping bondage.”

‘Find Those Bodies’: Behind One Man’s Push to Restore a North Texas Freedman’s Cemetery (Dallas Observer)

Dallas Observer: ‘Find Those Bodies’: Behind One Man’s Push to Restore a North Texas Freedman’s Cemetery. “Willie Hudspeth drove past the burial site the first time he went looking for the bodies. The longtime activist was trekking down a country road in search of a freedman’s cemetery in Pilot Point, a small town north of Denton. But over time, nature had run its course. Grass and weeds blanketed some 400 graves of St. John’s Cemetery, the final resting place for a community composed of freed slaves. Before a fence was installed, cattle would occasionally roam through the wooded grounds.”

Announcement | Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas (Brown University Library News)

Brown University Library News: Announcement | Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas. “The Library has been contributing to a community-centered database project led by Professor Linford Fisher that seeks to document the many instances of Indigenous enslavement in the Americas between 1492 through 1900. Formerly entitled, Database of Indigenous Slavery Archive (DISA), the project is now named, Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas.”

Daily Advertiser: National Park Service project documents existing sharecropper, slave dwellings in the South

Daily Advertiser: National Park Service project documents existing sharecropper, slave dwellings in the South. “There is a growing movement led by historical preservationists to preserve sharecropper and slave cabins in order to present a fuller narrative of the families who lived in those dwellings and to discuss the enduring legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow-era in modern-day America.”

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives. “The John B. Cade Library at Southern University recently expanded its online archive of slave stories, accounts told by former slaves who were interviewed in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The stories further a collection that had been compiled by the library’s namesake, who began collecting them even before serving as a dean at Southern from 1939-61.”

University of North Carolina at Greensboro: UNCG Receives Grant To Expand Digital Library On American Slavery

University of North Carolina at Greensboro: UNCG Receives Grant To Expand Digital Library On American Slavery. “UNC Greensboro University Libraries, along with faculty partners across the state, has received an $150,000 digital extension grant from The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) to expand its Digital Library on American Slavery (DLAS) to three more campuses in North Carolina: North Carolina Central University, UNC Pembroke, and East Carolina University.”