Barbados Government Information Service: Barbados Has Digital Runaway Slaves Collection

Barbados Government Information Service: Barbados Has Digital Runaway Slaves Collection. “The Department of Archives has partnered with the Early Caribbean Digital Archive (ECDA) at Northeastern University to create the Barbados Runaway Slaves Digital Collection. The collection is based on runaway advertisements in the recently digitized newspaper, The Barbados Mercury Gazette. It will provide a central location where Mercury advertisements are collected, a transcription platform, and other opportunities for the public, especially students, both in Barbados and abroad, to use the material in creative ways.”

Elon University: Irons integrates 3D printing technology and history for interactive hands-on learning

Elon University: Irons integrates 3D printing technology and history for interactive hands-on learning. “When teaching Elon undergraduates about enslavement in 19th century America, Professor of History Charles Irons aspired to bring the era to life in the classroom. He wanted his students to think more concretely about the realities of slavery that can be difficult to grasp. This quest led Irons to incorporate 3D-printed artifacts from the time period into his teaching.”

The Conversation: What Catholic Church records tell us about America’s earliest black history

The Conversation: What Catholic Church records tell us about America’s earliest black history. “In 1513, a free and literate African named Juan Garrido explored Florida with a Spanish conquistador, Juan Ponce de León. In the following decades, Africans, free and enslaved, were part of all the Spanish expeditions exploring the southern region of the United States. In 1565, Africans helped establish the first permanent European settlement in what is St. Augustine, Florida today. The Slave Societies Digital Archive which I direct as a historian at Vanderbilt University includes Catholic Church records from St. Augustine. These records date back to the 1590s and document some of the earliest black history of the U.S.”

Library of Virginia: Library Of Virginia And Virginia Museum Of History & Culture Merge Databases Of Records Of Enslaved Virginians

Library of Virginia: Library Of Virginia And Virginia Museum Of History & Culture Merge Databases Of Records Of Enslaved Virginians. “The Virginia Museum of History & Culture (VMHC) and the Library of Virginia are cooperating to provide greater access to African American history and genealogy in Virginia. In early January of 2019, the VMHC’s Unknown No Longer project (over 500 documents containing nearly 12,000 names) was merged with the Library’s Virginia Untold: The African American Narrative (over 10,000 records with more than 100,000 names), providing researchers with unprecedented access to an expanded collection of resources on the history of enslaved and free African Americans in Virginia. The combined databases are now available through the Virginia Untold web page.”

Cornell University: Freedom on the Move launches database of fugitives from American slavery

Cornell University: Freedom on the Move launches database of fugitives from American slavery. “Freedom on the Move (FOTM), an online project devoted to fugitives from slavery in North America, is enlisting the help of the public to create a database for tens of thousands of advertisements placed by enslavers who wanted to recapture self-liberating Africans and African-Americans…. The free, open-source site has been designed to be accessible to the public. Users can quickly set up an account and begin working with digitized versions of the advertisements. Users transcribe the text of an advertisement and then answer questions about the ad and the person it describes. They can choose to transcribe ads from a particular state or specific time period, depending on their areas of interest.” I’m sure you’ve heard of this project before – it looks like I mentioned it in RB back in 2016 – but now it has officially launched.

The Advocate: Tracking family history of enslaved ancestors in Louisiana? Donaldsonville museum can help

The Advocate: Tracking family history of enslaved ancestors in Louisiana? Donaldsonville museum can help. “Researching family history for African-Americans in Louisiana often means traveling to parish courthouses to pull old records of slavery, the conveyance documents that in jarringly neat handwriting detail the buying and selling of human beings. There’s an effort underway that would make the process far easier. The River Road African American Museum in Donaldsonville has partnered with a genealogy website affiliated with the Mormon church for a pilot project that will use mostly volunteers to make slave conveyance records dating from 1777 to 1861 in Ascension Parish easier to find online.”

Maryland State Archives Facebook: Today marks the first day of Black History Month 2019.

Maryland State Archives Facebook: Today marks the first day of Black History Month 2019. . “In honor of this annual celebration, we have updated our Legacy of Slavery in Maryland database to include the names and regiments of over 1,000 United States Colored Troops, who are interred at the Loudon Park National Cemetery.”