NARA: Confederate Slave Payrolls Shed Light on Lives of 19th Century African American Families

NARA: Confederate Slave Payrolls Shed Light on Lives of 19th Century African American Families. “They are single lines, often with no last name, on paper yellowed but legible after 155 years, among thousands scrawled in loping letters that make up nearly 6,000 Confederate Slave Payroll records, a trove of Civil War documents digitized for the first time by National Archives staff in a multiyear project that concluded in January. For years, the Confederate Army required owners to loan their slaves to the military. From Virginia to Florida, the enslaved conscripts were forced to dig trenches and work at ordnance factories and arsenals, mine potassium nitrate to create gunpowder, or shore up forts.”

Celebrating Black History: MSU Libraries to digitize records of enslaved Mississippians for the first time (Mississippi State University)

Mississippi State University: Celebrating Black History: MSU Libraries to digitize records of enslaved Mississippians for the first time. “This undertaking compiles a wealth of 19th-century documents from across the South and, upon completion, will provide a fully text-searchable, indexed collection containing digital images of original documents that include individuals’ names and detailed physical descriptions. Primarily inspired by patron need, the project is based on a similar effort at the Virginia Museum of History and Culture called ‘Unknown No Longer.'”

Rhino Times: UNCG, A&T And Deeds Office Shed Light On Slave Trade History

Rhino Times: UNCG, A&T And Deeds Office Shed Light On Slave Trade History. “A few years ago, the Guilford County Register of Deeds office created a lot of excitement among historians and others interested in early Guilford County, by creating an online database of slave deeds that documented the sell of people rather than property. As an extension of that project, the Register of Deeds Office is now partnering with NC A&T State University’s History/Political Science Department and UNC-Greensboro’s People Not Property project to present a weekly community video interview series on ‘The Slave Deeds of Guilford County.'”

University of Nottingham: Major new database reveals slavery is still not illegal in half the world’s countries

University of Nottingham: Major new database reveals slavery is still not illegal in half the world’s countries. “A new global review of antislavery legislation has busted a popular misconception that slavery is now illegal in every country in the world. The Antislavery in Domestic Legislation Database has been compiled over the past five years and is launched today at the United Nations headquarters by the University of Nottingham’s Rights Lab in partnership with the Castan Centre for Human Rights (Monash University, Australia).”

WTOP: New digital project lays bare history of slavery around the White House

WTOP: New digital project lays bare history of slavery around the White House. “A new website initiative launched this week by the White House Historical Association takes an in-depth look into slavery around the nation’s capital. ‘Slavery in the President’s Neighborhood’ offers a comprehensive timeline and abundant resources on the enslaved people who built, worked for and lived around the White House.”

The New Yorker: The Fight to Preserve African-American History

The New Yorker: The Fight to Preserve African-American History. “The struggle over the physical record of slavery and uprising in Richmond is part of a larger, long-overdue national movement to preserve African-American history. Of the more than ninety-five thousand entries on the National Register of Historic Places—the list of sites deemed worthy of preservation by the federal government—only two per cent focus on the experiences of black Americans.”

New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission: LPC Releases Story Map Highlighting 50 Years of Designations Associated with NYC’s Abolitionist History

From last month, but I just found out about it now. From the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission: LPC Releases Story Map Highlighting 50 Years of Designations Associated with NYC’s Abolitionist History. “New York City played an important role in the effort to abolish slavery nationwide, and to assist those seeking to escape it. In observation of the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to America, LPC wanted to bring greater awareness to the city’s abolitionist history by telling the story through designated landmarks that embody it. Through narrative text, images, maps, and multimedia content, the public can learn the important history behind these buildings.”