Rhino Times: UNCG, A&T And Deeds Office Shed Light On Slave Trade History

Rhino Times: UNCG, A&T And Deeds Office Shed Light On Slave Trade History. “A few years ago, the Guilford County Register of Deeds office created a lot of excitement among historians and others interested in early Guilford County, by creating an online database of slave deeds that documented the sell of people rather than property. As an extension of that project, the Register of Deeds Office is now partnering with NC A&T State University’s History/Political Science Department and UNC-Greensboro’s People Not Property project to present a weekly community video interview series on ‘The Slave Deeds of Guilford County.'”

University of Nottingham: Major new database reveals slavery is still not illegal in half the world’s countries

University of Nottingham: Major new database reveals slavery is still not illegal in half the world’s countries. “A new global review of antislavery legislation has busted a popular misconception that slavery is now illegal in every country in the world. The Antislavery in Domestic Legislation Database has been compiled over the past five years and is launched today at the United Nations headquarters by the University of Nottingham’s Rights Lab in partnership with the Castan Centre for Human Rights (Monash University, Australia).”

WTOP: New digital project lays bare history of slavery around the White House

WTOP: New digital project lays bare history of slavery around the White House. “A new website initiative launched this week by the White House Historical Association takes an in-depth look into slavery around the nation’s capital. ‘Slavery in the President’s Neighborhood’ offers a comprehensive timeline and abundant resources on the enslaved people who built, worked for and lived around the White House.”

The New Yorker: The Fight to Preserve African-American History

The New Yorker: The Fight to Preserve African-American History. “The struggle over the physical record of slavery and uprising in Richmond is part of a larger, long-overdue national movement to preserve African-American history. Of the more than ninety-five thousand entries on the National Register of Historic Places—the list of sites deemed worthy of preservation by the federal government—only two per cent focus on the experiences of black Americans.”

New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission: LPC Releases Story Map Highlighting 50 Years of Designations Associated with NYC’s Abolitionist History

From last month, but I just found out about it now. From the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission: LPC Releases Story Map Highlighting 50 Years of Designations Associated with NYC’s Abolitionist History. “New York City played an important role in the effort to abolish slavery nationwide, and to assist those seeking to escape it. In observation of the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to America, LPC wanted to bring greater awareness to the city’s abolitionist history by telling the story through designated landmarks that embody it. Through narrative text, images, maps, and multimedia content, the public can learn the important history behind these buildings.”

Next City: ‘People Not Property’ Aims to Create Statewide Database of Slave Deeds in North Carolina

Next City: ‘People Not Property’ Aims to Create Statewide Database of Slave Deeds in North Carolina. “When Deshawn Elam started college at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, an Historically Black College (HBCU) in Greensboro, N.C., he thought he would become a history teacher. But life changed his plans. One of his first classes introduced Elam to digital archiving.”

The Local, Germany: New website shows how German industry used Auschwitz prisoners as slaves

The Local, Germany: New website shows how German industry used Auschwitz prisoners as slaves. “The site pulls together more than a decade of research on some 45 sub-camps or ‘kommandos’ located on the periphery of the most notorious site of the Nazi Holocaust. Based on first-hand accounts and research in the archives of the Auschwitz-Birkenau museum and others, the site contains more than 3,500 photos, documents and maps. It tells the story of each sub-camp, including lists of the survivors and SS guards and information about their personal stories. The site also lists the industrial organisations implicated in exploiting prisoners at the camps.”