British Library: Help trace the stories of enslaved people in the Caribbean using colonial newspapers

British Library: Help trace the stories of enslaved people in the Caribbean using colonial newspapers . “We are excited to launch a new crowdsourcing project that explores the links between slavery and newspapers in late 18th and early 19th century Barbados: Agents of Enslavement: Colonial newspapers in the Caribbean and hidden genealogies of the enslaved. This project will examine the extent to which newspapers facilitated and challenged the practice of slavery. It will also help to reveal the identities, networks, and acts of resistance of enslaved people hidden within these printed texts.”

University of New Orleans: History Professor Mary Niall Mitchell Collaborates With New Orleans Teachers, Others on Pilot Project Using Freedom on the Move Data

University of New Orleans: History Professor Mary Niall Mitchell Collaborates With New Orleans Teachers, Others on Pilot Project Using Freedom on the Move Data. “University of New Orleans history professor Mary Niall Mitchell is collaborating with New Orleans public school teachers, museum directors and other community leaders to develop a K-12 curriculum using Freedom on the Move’s (FOTM) database of advertisements seeking runaway enslaved people. The digital database, which Mitchell is a lead historian, is the largest digital collection of newspaper advertisements for people escaping from North American slavery. Culled from 18th- and 19th-century U.S. newspapers, the ads, placed by enslavers, are used to document the lives of people escaping bondage.”

‘Find Those Bodies’: Behind One Man’s Push to Restore a North Texas Freedman’s Cemetery (Dallas Observer)

Dallas Observer: ‘Find Those Bodies’: Behind One Man’s Push to Restore a North Texas Freedman’s Cemetery. “Willie Hudspeth drove past the burial site the first time he went looking for the bodies. The longtime activist was trekking down a country road in search of a freedman’s cemetery in Pilot Point, a small town north of Denton. But over time, nature had run its course. Grass and weeds blanketed some 400 graves of St. John’s Cemetery, the final resting place for a community composed of freed slaves. Before a fence was installed, cattle would occasionally roam through the wooded grounds.”

Announcement | Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas (Brown University Library News)

Brown University Library News: Announcement | Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas. “The Library has been contributing to a community-centered database project led by Professor Linford Fisher that seeks to document the many instances of Indigenous enslavement in the Americas between 1492 through 1900. Formerly entitled, Database of Indigenous Slavery Archive (DISA), the project is now named, Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas.”

Daily Advertiser: National Park Service project documents existing sharecropper, slave dwellings in the South

Daily Advertiser: National Park Service project documents existing sharecropper, slave dwellings in the South. “There is a growing movement led by historical preservationists to preserve sharecropper and slave cabins in order to present a fuller narrative of the families who lived in those dwellings and to discuss the enduring legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow-era in modern-day America.”

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives. “The John B. Cade Library at Southern University recently expanded its online archive of slave stories, accounts told by former slaves who were interviewed in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The stories further a collection that had been compiled by the library’s namesake, who began collecting them even before serving as a dean at Southern from 1939-61.”

University of North Carolina at Greensboro: UNCG Receives Grant To Expand Digital Library On American Slavery

University of North Carolina at Greensboro: UNCG Receives Grant To Expand Digital Library On American Slavery. “UNC Greensboro University Libraries, along with faculty partners across the state, has received an $150,000 digital extension grant from The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) to expand its Digital Library on American Slavery (DLAS) to three more campuses in North Carolina: North Carolina Central University, UNC Pembroke, and East Carolina University.”

New York Times: What Should Museums Do With the Bones of the Enslaved?

New York Times: What Should Museums Do With the Bones of the Enslaved?. “The announcement was the latest development in a highly charged conversation about African-American remains in museum collections, especially those of the enslaved. In January, the president of Harvard University issued a letter to alumni and affiliates acknowledging that the 22,000 human remains in its collections included 15 from people of African descent who may have been enslaved in the United States, and pledging to review its policies of ‘ethical stewardship.’ And now, that conversation may be set to explode.”

NL Times: Massive archive of Dutch slavery past published in digital archive

NL Times: Massive archive of Dutch slavery past published in digital archive. “The national archive of the Netherlands launched a virtual archive containing around 1.9 million documents about the Dutch history of slavery. The archives consist of restored material from the West India Company, the commercial slave trader Middelburgse Commercie Compagnie, the Suriname Society and documents about the Dutch occupation of the coast of Guinea. Caretaker education minister Ingrid van Engelshoven launched the archive on Friday. It is mainly comprise slave purchase records, ship logs, plantation lists, cargo overviews and invoices. Personal letters are also included, though they have not been fully investigated.”

EurekAlert: $1.4 million Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant expands Enslaved.org research

EurekAlert: $1.4 million Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant expands Enslaved.org research. “The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded $1.4 million to Michigan State University for Enslaved: Peoples of the Historical Slave Trade, or Enslaved.org, a first-of-its-kind database containing millions of records cataloging the lives of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Enslaved.org, developed and maintained by MSU researchers, links data collections from multiple universities, archives, museums and family history centers.”

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries . “Struggles for Liberty takes its name from the phrase ‘struggles in the cause of liberty’, written by Lewis Henry Douglass (eldest son of Frederick Douglass) of his mother, Anna Murray Douglass’s tireless, heroic antislavery and social justice activism. The resource is structured by theme: the ‘Story of the Slave’; the History of Black Abolition; the US Civil War; African American activists in Scotland; and the Anna Murray and Frederick Douglass Family. It also includes interactive maps and downloadable learning activities for teachers, including activities mapped to the Curriculum for Excellence.”

Emory News Center: New consortium will ensure future of SlaveVoyages database

Emory News Center: New consortium will ensure future of SlaveVoyages database. “The new consortium, organized by Emory, will function as a cooperative academic collaboration through a contractual agreement among six institutions: Emory, the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture at William & Mary, Rice University, and three campuses at the University of California that will assume a joint membership: UC Santa Cruz, UC Irvine and UC Berkeley. Membership is for a three-year term and is renewable.”

Cavalier Daily: Law School launches new website exploring its connections to slavery

Cavalier Daily: Law School launches new website exploring its connections to slavery. “The University’s Law school launched Slavery and the U.Va. School of Law — a new website and digital archive that explores the law school’s historical connections to slavery — on Feb 1. At the core of this project are digitized versions of law students’ notebooks from the antebellum time period, when slavery was taught as a social good.”

Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana

New-to-me: Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana. “Frederick Baconnais was born during the peak of the sugar cane harvest season at the Evergreen Plantation in Edgard, Louisiana. At 5 a.m. on Dec. 12, 1852, he drew his first breath, according to historic records. His mother, Victorine, a house slave at Evergreen, was 18 years old. He was only two when she died. But Baconnais would name one of his daughters Victoria in remembrance of his mother. Their stories are among several recounted through photos and narratives in Evergreen’s Ancestor Project.”