Barbados Government Information Service: Barbados Has Digital Runaway Slaves Collection

Barbados Government Information Service: Barbados Has Digital Runaway Slaves Collection. “The Department of Archives has partnered with the Early Caribbean Digital Archive (ECDA) at Northeastern University to create the Barbados Runaway Slaves Digital Collection. The collection is based on runaway advertisements in the recently digitized newspaper, The Barbados Mercury Gazette. It will provide a central location where Mercury advertisements are collected, a transcription platform, and other opportunities for the public, especially students, both in Barbados and abroad, to use the material in creative ways.”

Library of Virginia: Library Of Virginia And Virginia Museum Of History & Culture Merge Databases Of Records Of Enslaved Virginians

Library of Virginia: Library Of Virginia And Virginia Museum Of History & Culture Merge Databases Of Records Of Enslaved Virginians. “The Virginia Museum of History & Culture (VMHC) and the Library of Virginia are cooperating to provide greater access to African American history and genealogy in Virginia. In early January of 2019, the VMHC’s Unknown No Longer project (over 500 documents containing nearly 12,000 names) was merged with the Library’s Virginia Untold: The African American Narrative (over 10,000 records with more than 100,000 names), providing researchers with unprecedented access to an expanded collection of resources on the history of enslaved and free African Americans in Virginia. The combined databases are now available through the Virginia Untold web page.”

Cornell University: Freedom on the Move launches database of fugitives from American slavery

Cornell University: Freedom on the Move launches database of fugitives from American slavery. “Freedom on the Move (FOTM), an online project devoted to fugitives from slavery in North America, is enlisting the help of the public to create a database for tens of thousands of advertisements placed by enslavers who wanted to recapture self-liberating Africans and African-Americans…. The free, open-source site has been designed to be accessible to the public. Users can quickly set up an account and begin working with digitized versions of the advertisements. Users transcribe the text of an advertisement and then answer questions about the ad and the person it describes. They can choose to transcribe ads from a particular state or specific time period, depending on their areas of interest.” I’m sure you’ve heard of this project before – it looks like I mentioned it in RB back in 2016 – but now it has officially launched.

The Kenyon Collegian: Digital archive features Gullah culture work

The Kenyon Collegian: Digital archive features Gullah culture work. “As of this fall, Professor of American Studies Peter Rutkoff and Professor Emeritus of History Will Scott have published their extensive research on the Gullah culture. The project, which has developed over the course of two decades, is now publicly available via the Digital Kenyon archive. Gullah refers to a language, a people and a culture dating back to the middle of the 17th century. Today, only 6,000 Gullah speakers remain, most of whom live on St. Helena Island off the coast of South Carolina.” I can’t find the URL for the archive in the article – I may have missed it – anyway let me tell you it’s at https://digital.kenyon.edu/gullah/ .

Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims (Charleston Chronicle)

Charleston Chronicle: Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims. “The oft-overlooked experiences of the Lowcountry’s African Muslims are the subject of a new digital exhibit now freely available online. The exhibit—formally styled Enslaved and Freed African Muslims: Spiritual Wayfarers in the South and Lowcountry—documents more than three centuries of West African Muslims, from those forcibly brought to the Americas before the War of Independence to adherents of Islam in the Lowcountry today.”

Enslaved People in Eighteenth-century Britain: An Interview with Nelson Mundell (Black Perspectives)

Black Perspectives: Enslaved People in Eighteenth-century Britain: An Interview with Nelson Mundell. “In today’s post, Keisha N. Blain, Senior Editor of Black Perspectives, interviews Nelson Mundell about the new online database, Runaway Slaves in Britain: Bondage, Freedom and Race in the Eighteenth Century. Mundell is a former History teacher with a MEd in Education and is finishing his history PhD thesis, ‘The Runaway Enslaved in Eighteenth-century Britain,’ at the University of Glasgow in Scotland.”